Vintage Mustang Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!
  • May's Ride of the Month contest ended with a tie! Go to this thread to vote on the winner! VOTE HERE
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys.Im new to the classic cars scene and just have a few questions.Im just wondering what to really look for when searching.Im gonna be looking at a 1967 Mustang 289 Automatic this weekend.It was restored in 2005.Im just wondering what i should look for exactly.Im not new to cars...just classic cars.I have been reading alot of ebay ad's and i see alot of people saying(matching numbers and codes ,A-Code for example.Im not sure what these mean...but im sure they are important.Any help would be great.Thanks again
 
G

·
Find somebody that knows classic mustangs and take them with you. Check for excessive bondo, rust at quarter panels, cowl, frame rails front and rear, front corners of doors, bottom of front fenders etc. Crawl underneath and look for obvious repairs and excessive undercoating. Does the car sit level? What mods have been done that cant be reversed? As you can see there are tons of things to look for especially when somebody tells you it was restored a couple years ago. Everybody has a different idea of a restoration....o ya and fill out your profile. Welcome!!!!
 

·
Registered
Current cars include 1969 Mach 1 and 1970 Cougar XR7 convertible
Joined
·
8,682 Posts
First, welcome to VMF.

Second, there a lot of things to sift through and look for in a vintage Mustang inspection...maybe more than you can glean from the "search" feature of this site between now and this weekend!! Beyond the usual things a prudent buyer would do on any used vehicle purchase, you need to look for evidnce of rust, past and present, as these old rigs were not rustproofed from the factory in any meaningful way.

Third, "numbers matching" is kind of a misnomer with old Mustangs as unique identifiaction numbers were NOT used by Ford on major component parts when these cars were built. For a vintage Ford, date codes are usually the most you have to go on when looking for originality and even then, a range of "acceptable" dates are often the best you can hope for. Unless you are looking for a "concours" correct car, numbers matching is usually less of an issue when looking for a solid car at a good price.

Your profile does not indicate your location. Depending on where you (or the car) is located, you may be able to enlist the help of one of the "local" VMF members to help with your pre-purchse inspection.

Lastly, bring your unanswered questions here for solid advice and help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks very helpful reply...im in conencticut.So i am in a rust belt state.Anyways i do have a very good background in cars.Well late model cars anyways.The muscle car area was and is well before my time.I honestly dont know much about carb'd engines.However i know variable timing,fuel injection,turbo's like the back of my hand.Let me know what you guys can get out of that ad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Just from looking at the pics the car looks solid. He said there was only a few spots of rust on the bumpers which isn't bad, considering that he's telling the truth and that is actually all of the rust. From the little you can see of th eengine compartment it looks solid. The interior looks to be in great shape. I would just try to find someone close enough to you who knows classic cars who would go with you and check it out.

But, just judging by pics it looks great.

Welcome to the forum as well.
 

·
Registered
Current cars include 1969 Mach 1 and 1970 Cougar XR7 convertible
Joined
·
8,682 Posts
The car in the ad looks very nice. If it is as solid underneath as it appears on top, it should be a contender on your short list. As for Connecticut VMFers, the one I can think of off the top of my head is Vinnie (VMF screen name "Teebone"). If he isn't able to help, perhaps he may have a suggestion of someone else in the area that can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank You...How is the price?Based on what i have seen it seems good.I have been exchanging e-mails and the sellers seem very honest.Dealing everyday with sellers and buyers of cars,i can usually tell the condition just by the way the e-mails are explained.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
I would say 8K is a fair price, but it never hurts to make an offer lower just to see. But 8K is very reasonable for a car that is totally restored and in great condition, as it appears to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yea...He told me he purchased it in the south.He lived in georgian and is in the navy and got shipped up here.Anyways he said he bought it for 13,200.However he needs to sell it because he is having a second child and this car is not good for him at this time in his life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Yeah I read the ad and his reasons. I guess you kinda hate to offer a lowball. $8000 is a good price though and you wouldn't be disappointed in spending that on that car, or atleast I wouldn't (assuming I had $8000 :p).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yea...i think he may go a little lower.In his e-mail he said he would do 7800.I might start off with 7300 if it is immaculate aside from a couple tiny spots of rust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,279 Posts
Welcome to VMF ! I think the car looks great, nicely optioned and the price seems real fair based on the pics. I doubt it will last long. Test the cowls for leaks, inspect the floors, torque boxes, shock towers, frame rails front to back. Take someone with you ! Let us know how it works out ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks man.I will for sure.The car is only about 10 mins away for me.Thats what got me really intrested...I have a question thats besides the point.I have rebuilt a few older small block chevy's(back several years ago in tech school).There extremley easy to do,anyways i was just wondering if there is a engine i could swap into this where i would have to change the tranny?Maybe a 390?I heard a 428 needs 9" rear and a different transmission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,234 Posts
First off, welcome to VMF!! That looks like a pretty nice car from the pictures.

First things first...I suggest that you take a second person along with you (preferably someone who knows these classic cars, or a mechanic, but an uninterested party will do fine as well). You need someone to help keep you grounded while looking at the car; and a second set of eyes never hurts.

The first thing I do is look at the car from a distance and see what problems I can spot. Are the panel gaps good, are there waves in the panels, is the car leaking fluids.

Next I move in close. Are there rust bubbles, dents, what does the chrome trim look like.

Then I like to look around the interior. Is it clean and in good shape, what is the mileage, is the dash pad cracked, look under the doors to see if they are rusting or rust damaged, and I try to pull up the carpet to see the floor pans and see what type of shape they are in. Dont forget to look in the trunk. Does it look like it has been hit? Is there any bondo?

Then I go to the engine compartment. Any oil leaks, does the motor tick when it runs, any coolant leaks, how clean is the engine compartment?

Maybe one of the most important parts of the experience is the drive. Try to drive the thing a lot. You need to get the thing up to operating temp. Does it accelerate well or does it hesitate? Does it pull one way or the other when you brake? Does it run hot? How is the oil pressure? Does it smoke when you hit the gas hard?

If at all possible, before you go, set up an appointment at a look mechanics shop to get the car on a lift. This can tell you a lot about a car. Look for spots that look to have been rewelded after a wreck or damage. Is it show signs of heavy rust or rust holes? Any leaks you didnt see before?

I suggest you look at several cars. That first one is always the hardest one to get away from. The car looks like a very nice car and the price does not seem all that bad. Always start low when offering a price. You dont want to offend him but you want some room to work. Take cash if possible; cash does wonders to swinging the deal in your favor. If you have any doubts, listen to what your brain is telling you. There are always other cars out there. Good luck!!
 
G

·
Dont take this wrong.....if you buy the car leave it alone and drive it for a year or so. If you are still interested then think about swapping a 390 in. Just sayin'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,279 Posts
swapping an FE engine would require several other swaps... Are you just wanting a bit more power ?

Consider building a 351W or you could stoke the small block to a 347ci ? Just some ideas.. I would have a hard time taking apart that car without driving it for awhile and enjoying it. Perhaps go to some Mustang car shows in the spring and figure out what you really like / want to do with your new project w/o spending the anymore than you have too?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank You for the response.I myself am a mechanic.However it is for subaru's which is a whole different ball of wax.Like i said classic cars are new to me,however cars are not.I will certainlly take your advice tommarow when i go look at it.

As for my question about the whole engine swap issue...I was more curious then anything.I always like to know.I took a few 350's out of chevelle a few years back and could probably do it now within 45 mins on a lift.Very easy engines to work on.Well we will see what happens tommarow.I will let you all know.Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
I Live in the area if you need a second opinion and maybe a neutral set of eyes. E-mail me direct at [email protected] and I would be more than glad to help you!
 

·
Registered
Current cars include 1969 Mach 1 and 1970 Cougar XR7 convertible
Joined
·
8,682 Posts
On your big block swap question, here are some things to consider. A "proper" swap means upgrading other parts to take the additional weight and power potential of the big block engine. A C6 trans was the standard big block AT; a 9 inch rear is what Ford installed at the factory; Springs designed for the additional weight of a big block are a good idea; larger radiator, shroud, and fan are needed to cool the big block; the exhaust system needs to be capable of handling the extra flow of a big block; brake system upgrades (larger rear drums?)probably a good idea. To a certain extent most of these points will need to be addressed no matter what engine you choose to replace the stock drivetrain.

To my ear, there is just something about the rumble of a big block that puts a grin on my face.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top