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It appears that my 66 coupe will need toe boards. What's the proper way to fit / cut the new sheet metal to fit? I saw a video that had the new sheet metal screwed in place over the old metal, then a cut off wheel through both layers of metal.

Or would the method be trace out the new sheet metal, remove it, cut the line? Is it necessary to account for the thickness of the cutting wheel in this case?

would the heater box on the passenger side need to come out?
 

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Watch this video.

 

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Couple thoughts on the subject: Many insist on butt welds claiming lap welds catch moisture and lead to rust. Lap welds are stronger though and the car is already full of them. AND, in this application, I am going to bet that the patches aren't going to fit the greatest. With a lap weld you can hammer and sheet metal screw the edges into place to hold while you are welding. Then pull the screws and weld up the holes. Then thoroughly seal on both sides the way you would any other lap joint.
Butt welds on those irregular surfaces are going to require a lot of hammering, clamping and patience.....unless you get a lot better patches than I did.
 

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I agree with the others. There’s nothing wrong with lapping the joints. It WILL be much easier to install and I suggest you lap it. It will be a royal PITA to butt weld it. Just seam seal both sides after install and it will be good. Butt welding is usually better for use on exterior body panels where you can weld in a patch that is flush and therefore will require much less filler.

I just replaced both the r/l toe boards on my car and lapped the joints.
 

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The original floor pans end right before the curve up the toe board and actually sit on top of the toe board metal. The new pans (at least the ones I got from NPD) are actually longer in the front and include a few inches up the toe board. You might just get lucky and the floor pan might be long enough to take care of the floor and the toe board in one shot.
 

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Having replaced both the toe board and the floors, my rust was so bad, I just started cutting back to good(?) metal. I was left with a big nasty hole. In some areas I overlapped and did rosette welds, others were butt.
 

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I have repaired many toe boards over the years and have leaned towards butt welding them in place, when I could. Going with the lap weld, if you flange around the areas that are lapped, the underside of the repair will be close to flush, which will result in less bodywork. There will always be areas where a lap seam will not work and butt welding is your only option. It takes more time, and a lot of patience to make your repair close to seamless, I always like the challange.
Toe 1.jpg


Toe 2.jpg
 

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The passenger side looks like fun. Hopefully when you get it apart the portion of the frame rail covered up is solid. Right corner of passenger side looks the worst, but nothing too bad. Interested to see what you find. If you don’t have torque boxes would be a great time to add them and tie it all together.





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