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Discussion Starter #1
I have a "like new" 35mm Canon T70 camera w wide angle & telephoto lenses. Is it possible to convert to take digital pictures? the lenses have to take better results than iPhone!
I inherited this from Father-in Law back in 2012. It's been sitting in sealed tote w batteries removed since then.

TY,
Gimpy
 

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I don't think you can convert the camera, but you might be able to use the lens on a modern digital camera case.
You might want to go to camera store (if one near you still exists!) or Best Buy and check out your lens on their cases.
 

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There have been some kits in the past to fit film cameras to digital but they haven't really taken off. Generally for the price of the kit you could buy a digital that would out perform it, and the best ideas never seemed to get off the ground. I have an old Canon AE1 with some nice lenses and I would love to update it. In all honesty though, I have a couple digital units, that out zoom the old lenses that I used to love so much.

First link is telling why it will never happen, second and third are some of the attempts.

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/5677027893/why-your-beloved-film-slr-is-never-going-digital

https://www.diyphotography.net/film-35-is-yet-another-solution-that-converts-your-old-film-camera-into-digital/

https://www.digitaltrends.com/photography/im-back-digital-back-for-film-cameras-kickstarter/
 

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This was an old attempt (2000) to make a drop in film cartridge with a plane that would work in almost any 35mm film camera. It took too long to develop (see what I did there?) and by the time it came out, dedicated digital cameras were much cheaper and better:


SILICON FILM TECHNOLOGIES
 

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Not really what you were asking about but maybe something to consider if you like the lenses.


I have few canon bodies and a bunch of glass. I keep looking at the Sony A series cameras with the E mount. There are adapters to use the canon FD lenses. Can't seem to pull the trigger. Each new one adds a feature I'd like to have. One of these days.....
 

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I have a Minolta Maxxom that I really love with a bunch of lenses. I use to like doing long time exposures at night with 100 ISO. But any way I don't think there is anything practical.
 

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I had a 35mm Canon EOS Rebel, and a couple of years ago, I got a digital EOS Rebel T5. Anyways, the lenses from the film camera mounted directly to the digital.
 

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Keep the lenses for a new digital camera, or sell the whole rig to someone that's into vintage and use the cash to buy a new one.
 

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In a film camera, the film itself is the "sensor" that the image is captured on. It's location in the camera has been engineered to be in the precise location for the image to focus on exposing the full frame of film. In a digital camera, the sensor is now a light sensitive piece of electronics. It is a lot smaller than the size of the film which affects the placement of the lens to provide the proper light image. In addition, that digital sensor is only a light sensor. The digital camera has a circuit board filled with electronics, including a computer processor and software, needed to process the image and then record it onto flash memory. As you can imagine, in order to get a quality photograph everything has to be precisely engineered to work together. There is no way a conversion kit would be practical for such a precise application. Do as the others have suggested and either sell the lot and shop for the Digital SLR camera of your choice, or keep your current lenses and shop for a Digital SLR camera that the lenses will attach to. You will have better photos this way and you'll be happier with the results.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
GREAT help guys ! TY,
Gimpy
 

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I am in the Dallas area, and there is a classic camera store. I spoke to him about my Nikon (needed seals) and looked at the tons of cameras in his place.

He commented on Cameras being an item that everybody had, and had multiples of, and would never throw away. Similar to sewing machines, slide rules, etc.

So the market is overrun with unwanted, high end and all other ends, cameras.

Since all film locally is sent out now to be developed (bad chemicals, EPA liability, etc.) I just decided to toss the towel, and sold off my stuff on ebay. Some went cheap, some decent, but if I ever wanted to own a Nikon again, there were tons for sale on ebay.
 

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If you actually use the camera very much, the digital camera will actually pay for itself in the cost savings of consumables. Think what the cost of film, processing, and printing would actually be if you were to take a lot of photos. And you have to factor in that the digital photos are available right away. So you'd need to factor in the cost for expedited processing and printing which would still be glacially slow compared to the results from digital photography. Film based photography would only make sense to a really specialized type of photographer.


Another aspect of digital photography is how to display and appreciate your photographs. My wife has over 17,000 photos she's taken over the years of family and trips, etc. She wanted a digital photo frame to put on a shelf to display the collection. After doing some research, I concluded that a digital photo frame was a poor implementation of displaying a large photo collection. Actually, a screen saver slideshow application performed the task very well because it could randomly display the collection from the folder structure the collection was stored in without any modifications to the photos in the collection. There are tiny, fanless Windows computers available today that you can connect to a TV via an HDMI cable. So this is what I did for her. I got her a 32 inch 1080p TV and one of these tiny computers. I built her a shelf to place that TV on. She copied her entire collection of photos onto a Flash drive and plugged it into the tiny computer. I set up the Windows on that computer to automatically log in a restricted "Photo" user id and set it to automatically kick off the screen saver. So now she only needs to turn on the TV and computer in the morning and walk away. All day long her collection randomly displays on that screen. She has really loved it. It is always bringing back good memories for her. I mention this because she now enjoys her entire collection of photos with no printing consumables involved. And when she takes new photos, she only needs to copy the new folder onto the flash drive to add them to the display.
 

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I have a Minolta SR-7 I've owned since I was in middle school. I bought it at a garage sale and added a nice, telephoto lens. Takes AMAZING pictures. Sure, digital is convenient, but there's still nothing wrong with film cameras; especially if you're in a hostile environment. I could drag my Minolta through the Amazon rain forest, on fire or not, and my Minolta would keep on shooting. A digital camera would have to be hermetically sealed in such an environment.

So, don't be afraid to shoot film. It's retro. It's nostalgic. It's fun. And, yeah, you can mount your old lenses on a new, digital camera to boot.
 

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If you actually use the camera very much, the digital camera will actually pay for itself in the cost savings of consumables. Think what the cost of film, processing, and printing would actually be if you were to take a lot of photos. And you have to factor in that the digital photos are available right away. So you'd need to factor in the cost for expedited processing and printing which would still be glacially slow compared to the results from digital photography. Film based photography would only make sense to a really specialized type of photographer.


Another aspect of digital photography is how to display and appreciate your photographs. My wife has over 17,000 photos she's taken over the years of family and trips, etc. She wanted a digital photo frame to put on a shelf to display the collection. After doing some research, I concluded that a digital photo frame was a poor implementation of displaying a large photo collection. Actually, a screen saver slideshow application performed the task very well because it could randomly display the collection from the folder structure the collection was stored in without any modifications to the photos in the collection. There are tiny, fanless Windows computers available today that you can connect to a TV via an HDMI cable. So this is what I did for her. I got her a 32 inch 1080p TV and one of these tiny computers. I built her a shelf to place that TV on. She copied her entire collection of photos onto a Flash drive and plugged it into the tiny computer. I set up the Windows on that computer to automatically log in a restricted "Photo" user id and set it to automatically kick off the screen saver. So now she only needs to turn on the TV and computer in the morning and walk away. All day long her collection randomly displays on that screen. She has really loved it. It is always bringing back good memories for her. I mention this because she now enjoys her entire collection of photos with no printing consumables involved. And when she takes new photos, she only needs to copy the new folder onto the flash drive to add them to the display.

That's really slick. I would however politely suggest you and your wife select some of best shots and PRINT THEM. When we're all dead and gone, people can still easily flip through enjoy photo albums full of prints. But they won't have any way to display files from a flash drive.
 

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I have been using my AE 1 program more in the last 2 yrs and like it ! I found a local shop to get film, and have them develop it, about 1 mile from the house. Last time I went in there to pick up film they had more envelopes waiting for pick up than Costco does.
 
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