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Well props go out to abadtb2 and Art and anyone else that mentioned the battery to be the cause of my troubles posted in "OK, I fricken give up".

I had replaced the starter, the solenoid and the ignition switch and still the starter refused to disengage. I had gotten to where I distrusted the cheap solenoid that I got from Autozone and I was also considering what abadtb2 had said about a low battery causing the problems. I went to Napa and bought another sloenoid and then mentioned the problem to the guy behind the desk. He wasn't a great mechanic, but he piqued my interest when he mentioned that he knew that if you put too small a battery into a riding lawn mower that the starter wouldn't disengage.

That was enough evidence for me to go ahead and buy a battery also. So the first thing I swapped out was the battery and the starter started working perfectly. Cool.

Later the solenoid did act up a little when I turned the car off and it kept running. But I figured since I'd abused that solenoid several times while trying to find the problem it was probably burned a bit. Put the new sillynoid on and everythings been groovy for the last few days.

It's certainly pretty strange how a low battery could cause this problem, but I can't argue with results. What a screwed up system. So it seems my classic mustang has about the same level of technology as a riding mower.
 

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So it seems my classic mustang has about the same level of technology as a riding mower.

Huh? You're giving it that much credit? I've always said Mustang electrical systems are simply an example of exquisite door bell chime technology. *G*
 

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I still say you missed a great opportunity to plop in a new 5.0 starter! Oh well, glad the problem is solved. My 65 has nowhere NEAR the technology of my Kawasaki powered John Deere lawn mower....or did you mean one of those spinning blade mechanical push mowers?
 

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After thinking about it, I now know the reason. The battery provides power to kick out the bendix, which engages the starter motor and spins it. To release the bendix, power is also applied to retract the gear. But after engaging the starter and spinning it, the voltage on the battery gets lower, and at some point, there just isn't enough juice to kick it back.

I like the explanation, and I'm sticking by it!
 
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