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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey Guys,

I'm new to the forum and have had my 65 vert for a little over 4 years now. I would like to start fixing it up a little nicer but have some questions. The car is pretty much all original except a marginal paint job that was done over 20 years ago. The seats are all original with no tears in them. It has a newer top on it. The carpet was replaced at some point and is in good condition. The engine is a 289 C code that has 108K miles on it and has not been overhauled. It has a bit of a tick in it at starting that could be a main bearing or lifter but goes away within a few seconds after starting. It runs good but is probably due for a good overhaul. The tranny is an automatic and shifts nice and smooth. I can only see one place on the body that has some bondo and it's on the left rear quarter panel. No visable rust on the body.

When I bought it, it had been sitting in a garage with a cover on it for the past 17 years. I flushed the lines, radiator, gas tank, replaced all the fluids, battery, belts, hoses, fuel pump, water pump and did a complete tune up with new points, plugs, cap, rotor, plugs and wires, replaced the wheel cylinders on the brakes and put new tires on it.

Over all, the car is in really good shape for being 46 years old and not much being done to it. It has always been garaged and hasn't been out in the rain or bad weather for the past 21 years. I drive it on warm sunny weekends and occasionally on a good day during the week. I have only put 2000 miles on it in the past 4 years. I don't want to turn it in to a show car and spend a fortune on it to be a weekend driver. I do want it to look nice and be dependable (which it pretty much is now).

Ok, so lots of questions:

How important is it to keep the original parts on it like chrome trim, seats etc. ?

Should I keep the original parts I take off just to have them or is there any value in that?

If I should decide to change the color, does that hurt the value?

I assume I should start with the mechanics like suspension and engine before doing paint and interior?

I know there are a hundred ways to go with this, but I don't want to spend a bunch of money on it and have way more in it than it's worth. I bought it for $7000 and have about $8000 in it at this point as you see it in the pictures below.

So, what are your thoughts? The other thing I have a problem with is determining its value.
 

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C code car....Meh...not really a "collectors" car, but looks like a damned nice car from the photos. It sounds like you want to hang on to the car and taylor it to your likes. So I say do it. If you are looking to add new parts to sell it, keep it original and let the next owner make the decisions.
As far as chrome trim, some of the newer reproductions are so good, you cannot tell the difference. just keep the old stuff stashed somewhere.
As far as paint, done correctly it should not distract from the value since we are not talking about a K code, GT, Shelby, Boss, Mach or CJ car. But white and red is beautiful! Why change?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the input Scott. I don't plan on selling it. I'm sure at some point, it will go to my son but he's only 8 right now. Funny about the white being beautiful. White and red has always been one of my least favorite color combinations but you can't be picky about what you find stored on a farm for 17 years. :) I don't dislike the white and red, but I really like the Guardsman blue with blue interior but it would be a pretty big change.
 

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Wow that is one sweet car!

I’m very much in the same boat, as my ’66 coupe is a very common car. There’s nothing too special about it relative to all the other cars that were made, except of course that I own it ;) I’ve had it for about four years, just like you.

With all the original stuff on my ride, I’m constantly in the “keep it original vs. restomod it” debate. I very much like the stock look, and have even changed out parts in the past that I wished I would have kept in a box somewhere.

My solution to this is tonow keep it original looking, make changes to have the car more livable (Pertronix, planning disc brake conversion, etc.), and hang onto any parts I swap out for the next owner. I don’t want there to be a next owner, as I’d like to hang onto this car until I kick the bucket, but I also don’t want to do anything which would make it hard for anyone to return it to a near original condition.

Specifically on the chrome front, it’s nearly impossible to get stuff re-chromed at a reasonable price out here in CA. I’ve been told that the original parts are thicker metal than the new replacements that are available. Honestly I’ve never been able to compare side-by-side so I can’t speak to that comment. But it does seem like if you have space to store parts, it can’t hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wow that is one sweet car!

I’m very much in the same boat, as my ’66 coupe is a very common car. There’s nothing too special about it relative to all the other cars that were made, except of course that I own it ;) I’ve had it for about four years, just like you.

With all the original stuff on my ride, I’m constantly in the “keep it original vs. restomod it” debate. I very much like the stock look, and have even changed out parts in the past that I wished I would have kept in a box somewhere.

My solution to this is tonow keep it original looking, make changes to have the car more livable (Pertronix, planning disc brake conversion, etc.), and hang onto any parts I swap out for the next owner. I don’t want there to be a next owner, as I’d like to hang onto this car until I kick the bucket, but I also don’t want to do anything which would make it hard for anyone to return it to a near original condition.

Specifically on the chrome front, it’s nearly impossible to get stuff re-chromed at a reasonable price out here in CA. I’ve been told that the original parts are thicker metal than the new replacements that are available. Honestly I’ve never been able to compare side-by-side so I can’t speak to that comment. But it does seem like if you have space to store parts, it can’t hurt.
Thanks for the compliment. I don't plan on doing any restomods on it. I have always been somewhat of a purist and like cars the way they came out of the factory, even with their flaws. It was obvious by the bumper jack in the trunk and the huge bend in the front bumper that someone didn't know what they were doing when they jacked it up. I bought a new replacment bumper for it and I couldn't tell much difference between it and the original...except the huge bend in the original.

The more I think about it, I'm probably going to start with some new leaf springs and shocks since I'm sure they are worn out. The leaf springs have a rattle when it goes over a bump and I know the shocks are at least 20 years old. I'd like to get the suspension and engine done before any paint or interior. I think the suspension work will be minimal since it seems to drive good and tracks straight. 70mph on the highway is smooth and straight.

I'm really fortunate that there is a Mustang parts business about 5 minutes from my house www.missourimustang.com and I can get virtually anything I need from him. He's a really nice and knowledgable guy and I don't have to pay shipping.

Good luck with your project and post some pictures for me.
 

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Sounds to me like you are headed in the right direction.. unfortunately.. nothing is inexpensive when it comes to restoration.. We started with our motor.. rebuilding the original engine so as to keep it stock.. and well.. now some suspension work to do .. and then some body and paint work to be done.. but all in all.. my 1967 Mustang coupe is worth it to me.. we are debating on whether to change from drum to disc in the front..but well that is still in discussion.. any ways your car is sweet and I know in the end you will love the results no matter what you do.. Ms.SassY/Karen...
 

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"Guardsman blue with blue interior but it would be a pretty big change."

Dude, You are crazy if you go that drastic.. The car looks sweet as it is.. If you get tired of the color, Try changeing the wheels to Styled Steel wheels, You'll forget about the color in no time.. White and Red is a really classic Mustang color, just like White and Black interior. Many Original promo pics were taken with White convertibles with Red interiors and Black interiors.

I say, Leave it alone.

Tony K.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sounds to me like you are headed in the right direction.. unfortunately.. nothing is inexpensive when it comes to restoration.. We started with our motor.. rebuilding the original engine so as to keep it stock.. and well.. now some suspension work to do .. and then some body and paint work to be done.. but all in all.. my 1967 Mustang coupe is worth it to me.. we are debating on whether to change from drum to disc in the front..but well that is still in discussion.. any ways your car is sweet and I know in the end you will love the results no matter what you do.. Ms.SassY/Karen...
Thanks Karen. These things seem to be able to absorb as much money as you care to pour in to them.

"Guardsman blue with blue interior but it would be a pretty big change."

Dude, You are crazy if you go that drastic.. The car looks sweet as it is.. If you get tired of the color, Try changeing the wheels to Styled Steel wheels, You'll forget about the color in no time.. White and Red is a really classic Mustang color, just like White and Black interior. Many Original promo pics were taken with White convertibles with Red interiors and Black interiors.

I say, Leave it alone.

Tony K.
You're probably right Tony. I have always loved the blue but the longer I own this and the more I look in to it, the more it grows on me. I was looking at new seat covers and other items on line today. The interior could be brought up to almost new without a whole lot of cost as long as I leave it the same color. The dash is in perfect condition and I wouldn't have to change the steering wheel and kick panels. Same with the paint job. There's less work in the paint job when you're not changing colors. I also wouldn't have to worry about it later if it has a chip in it and it shows white under blue. Thanks for the reality check.
 

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Another one for keeping it white with red interior this is a real "clean" combination. Like NEFauroa said a set of s/s wheels on it or even the wire hubcaps would change the appearance but that white/red is timeless.........classic ! Very nice car.

GB
 

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The more I think about it, the more I really like the white exterior/red interior combo. There's a reason why it was so popular back in day, and today the white/red seems really nostalgic.

BTW, when I got my car, a buddy at work saw it and said I should change the interior to red! I also have a white car, but my black interior is in great shape, so no swap out is planned for me.
 

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Hey Guys,


I know there are a hundred ways to go with this, but I don't want to spend a bunch of money on it and have way more in it than it's worth. I bought it for $7000 and have about $8000 in it at this point as you see it in the pictures below.

QUOTE]

You can pretty much forget about this. You will not get back 100% on any money you spend on it. The more you spend the further upside down you will get.

There are only two exceptions: (1) all you are doing is basic cosmetic work, or (2) you do all the labor yourself.

As for "hurting the value" - make it like you want and forget about "the value". Reality is that your car is never going to hit the jackpot and be worth enough to put your kids through college. Only the extremely rare and desirable cars (think Boss 429) will ever be worth the big bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Another one for keeping it white with red interior this is a real "clean" combination. Like NEFauroa said a set of s/s wheels on it or even the wire hubcaps would change the appearance but that white/red is timeless.........classic ! Very nice car.

GB
You guys have convinced me to keep it the original colors. Even though there are number of colors I like better, I also like fastbacks but I don't think I'll try changing it to one. :)

The more I think about it, the more I really like the white exterior/red interior combo. There's a reason why it was so popular back in day, and today the white/red seems really nostalgic.

BTW, when I got my car, a buddy at work saw it and said I should change the interior to red! I also have a white car, but my black interior is in great shape, so no swap out is planned for me.
Thanks. White and red it is....and will be.

Hey Guys,


I know there are a hundred ways to go with this, but I don't want to spend a bunch of money on it and have way more in it than it's worth. I bought it for $7000 and have about $8000 in it at this point as you see it in the pictures below.

QUOTE]

You can pretty much forget about this. You will not get back 100% on any money you spend on it. The more you spend the further upside down you will get.

There are only two exceptions: (1) all you are doing is basic cosmetic work, or (2) you do all the labor yourself.

As for "hurting the value" - make it like you want and forget about "the value". Reality is that your car is never going to hit the jackpot and be worth enough to put your kids through college. Only the extremely rare and desirable cars (think Boss 429) will ever be worth the big bucks.
Dang! And I have three daughters in college right now. Guess I'll go to plan B. LOL. I've been looking over the past few years at prices and costs to restore and had decided that the best return on money would have been to sell it the day I bought it and cleaned it up. As you say, the more you put in to it, the closer to being upside down I get. Fortunately, I didn't buy it to sell. I bought it for a project and weekend driver. That's probably why I don't keep receipts unless its for warranty purposes. I used to be in real estate and it used to frustrate the heck out of me when a seller would ask what they should list their house for. After doing a market analysis and giving them some good comparable prices, they would say, "I can't sell it for that. I have more than that in it." They couldn't get it through their head that what they have in it has nothing to do with what it's worth. Pretty much the same with cars.
 
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