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I have a 67 automatic mustang 289 with an edelbrock performer manifold, edelbrock 4 bbl carb and headers with stock gears. I am having to replace my cylinder heads because my current cam put in by the PO has caused the studs to pull out. I will likely use edelbrock e street heads even though I will lose a little compression with the 60cc cumbustion chamber. I am trying to determine whether to keep my current cam, which I have been told might be too big for a 289 or to replace it with one of the options below. Not having a lot of knowledge and experience with cams I thought it would be helpful to get people's recommendation who might have been through this before. My car is a cars and coffee cruiser. Increasing horsepower is not a real priority for me. I am mostly looking for good drivability and not being sluggish from 0-60. I believe my current cam is a comp cams 250H Extreme XE250H comp cam (31-2303) with the following specs:

Camshaft Specifications:
  • RPM Range: 600 to 4800
  • Valve Timing: 0.006
  • Lobe separation (degrees): 110
  • Intake Centerline (degrees): 106
  • Valve Lash: Hydraulic
  • Duration: Intake 250/Exhaust 260
  • Duration @ .050" Lift: Intake 206/Exhaust 212
  • Valve Lift: Intake 0.460/Exhaust 0.474
  • Lobe Lift: Intake 0.289/Exhaust 0.296

Does anyone have experience with this cam in a 289? Thoughts about keeping it in? Too big for a 60s 289?

I am considering replacing it with one of the following cams. Anyone have a recommendation or experience with regard to the following cams for the 289? Thanks for the advice!

Comp Cams Camshaft (311154) 240H
This camshaft is best suited for a 289 engine with an automatic transmission and stock gears. The High Energy 240H camshaft provides good torque and economy characteristics, with a very smooth idle.

Camshaft Specifications:
  • RPM Range: 800 to 4500
  • Valve Timing: 0.012
  • Lobe separation (degrees): 108
  • Intake Centerline (degrees): 108
  • Valve Lash: Hydraulic
  • Duration: Intake 240/Exhaust 248
  • Duration @ .050" Lift: Intake 192/Exhaust 200
  • Valve Lift: Intake 0.416/Exhaust 0.416
  • Lobe Lift: Intake 0.26/Exhaust 0.26

Comp Cam High Energy 260H 31-2162

The High Energy 260H camshaft provides a excellent combo of torque and power. It is best suited for towing in 302 engines equipped with a manual transmission and low gears.

Camshaft Specifications:
  • RPM Range: 1200 to 5200
  • Valve Timing: 0.006
  • Lobe separation (degrees): 110
  • Intake Centerline (degrees): 106
  • Valve Lash: Hydraulic
  • Duration: Intake 260/Exhaust 260
  • Duration @ .050" Lift: Intake 212/Exhaust 212
  • Valve Lift: Intake 0.447/Exhaust 0.447
  • Lobe Lift: Intake 0.28/Exhaust 0.28

Comp cams Camshaft (312152) 252H

The High Energy 252H camshaft is good for low RPM torque in 289 and 302 engines. A great choice for 302 engines equipped with an automatic transmission that perform towing duties. This camshaft produces a smooth idle.

Camshaft Specifications:
  • RPM Range: 800 to 4800
  • Valve Timing: 0.006
  • Lobe separation (degrees): 110
  • Intake Centerline (degrees): 106
  • Valve Lash: Hydraulic
  • Duration: Intake 252/Exhaust 252
  • Duration @ .050" Lift: Intake 206/Exhaust 206
  • Valve Lift: Intake 0.433/Exhaust 0.433
  • Lobe Lift: Intake 0.272/Exhaust 0.272
 

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I don't think that cam would pull studs unless you had coil bind. I've tapped for screw in studs without pulling the heads.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think that cam would pull studs unless you had coil bind. I've tapped for screw in studs without pulling the heads.
The machine shop said the PO did not change the springs on the heads with the cam, so there was coil bind.
 

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That cam is fine - dont waste your money on anything smaller - plus you risk the "new flat tappet break in" procedure.....as far as the heads go, have the machine shop take .030 off before you install them - you will likely be buying rockers and going to an adjustible valvetrain as part of the swap too....
 

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Your cam should have been fine with stock valve springs and push in studs. I ran a .448/.472 lift cam for years with a stock valve train.

Unless your heads are in need of a major rebuild, you can solve the stud issue with either screw in studs or pins.
 

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Your cam should have been fine with stock valve springs and push in studs. I ran a .448/.472 lift cam for years with a stock valve train.

Unless your heads are in need of a major rebuild, you can solve the stud issue with either screw in studs or pins.
I had a stud pulling on my no. 5. Pulled the heads and the machine shop reworked for screw in studs. Re-installed old rockers and problem solved. I think it was less than $200.


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Bar, why not keep the cam you have, and do a valvejob on your small chamber 289 heads, and have the rocker bosses drill and tapped ? It could be that your cam really ISN'T that big, occasionally they just pull out. not that hard to fix, really,.....LSG
 

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I'm gonna go with the folks who say get screw in studs, keep the cam you have. Check them for spring bind, but I've used cams that tall with stock springs and studs with no problem. You say studs pullled out. How many two, or sixteen? I would port-match the heads to the exhaust while they are off. You'll be glad you did. You should also have your distributor professionally adjusted, if you haven't already. You'll be glad you did that, too.

Port Matching
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Bar, why not keep the cam you have, and do a valvejob on your small chamber 289 heads, and have the rocker bosses drill and tapped ? It could be that your cam really ISN'T that big, occasionally they just pull out. not that hard to fix, really,.....LSG
Maybe i will keep the cam I have given the feedback so far. The machine shop said the old heads would need a complete rebuild as the valves and seats are not made for unleaded gas etc, and I will need better springs and screw in studs will have to be put in. I like the original look of the 66 date coded heads, but do wonder whether I am throwing good money after bad. tough decision.
 

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Bar, what is your cost for the E streets ? and what kind of numbers are you getting from the shop ? IF you choose to rebuild the 67 heads, I'll help you with part numbers, I retired from engine shop work, and have some parts numbers in my head, and some notes I wrote before leaving work. OR, if you're just doing cars & coffee, why not a cheap set of used 302 heads, something late enough to already have hard seats ? LSG
 

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For a 289 w/ small cam and stock rear end gears w/auto, heads with 2.02 intake valves are overkill. Bigger is not always better. Velocity typically drops with larger valves/runners. Your torque may suffer.
 

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Want the best bag for your buck? Call one of those companies and speak to a specialist. Tell them what you've got (car, engine specs, transmission, rear end gear, tire circumference or diameter, weight, etc.) and how you'll be using it and let them either pick an off-the-shelf grind that best suits your needs or get a custom grind.
 

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Maybe i will keep the cam I have given the feedback so far. The machine shop said the old heads would need a complete rebuild as the valves and seats are not made for unleaded gas etc, and I will need better springs and screw in studs will have to be put in. I like the original look of the 66 date coded heads, but do wonder whether I am throwing good money after bad. tough decision.
Keep the cam, find a different machine shop. Like myself and others have stated in your other post, you will lose compression with different heads that are budget friendly. You're not wasting money rebuilding your current heads, they are perfectly fine for a street 289. You could have a shop port them a bit for improved flow if you really wanted to.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Keep the cam, find a different machine shop. Like myself and others have stated in your other post, you will lose compression with different heads that are budget friendly. You're not wasting money rebuilding your current heads, they are perfectly fine for a street 289. You could have a shop port them a bit for improved flow if you really wanted to.
Thanks. This is really helpful.
 

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Maybe i will keep the cam I have given the feedback so far. The machine shop said the old heads would need a complete rebuild as the valves and seats are not made for unleaded gas etc, and I will need better springs and screw in studs will have to be put in. I like the original look of the 66 date coded heads, but do wonder whether I am throwing good money after bad. tough decision.
Not at all. With the rebuild they suggest, you would have good heads- If you port-match them, very good.

BTW, that whole 'hardened seats for unleaded gas' thing turned out to be not so much. I doubt it cost you even 10% of your valve life. But if the seats are worn, it's an excellent way to get the heads back in the game.

Not tough at all.
 
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