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Discussion Starter #1
Sometime, probably in the late 70's, some young engineer in Detroit decided to leave his mark on the automotive world by saying "Hey, I got a cool idea! Let's mix metric and SAE hardware together on all our new cars!" If any of you know this moron, would you kindly SHOOT HIM!!

I'm STILL trying to pull the engine out of my daughters Jeep, and I'm down to the laaaaaast bolt. VERY difficult to get to. It looked like a 5/8. My 5/8 socket seemed to fit reasonably well. But NOOOOO! It's 15MM, as I found out after my impact wrench rounded that sucker off. AAARRRRRGGHHHH!!!
 

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OOH OUCH! :( Maybe your 5/8 socket could help me out, I've tried all 5 of mine and none of them are the right length to get the corner bolts off on the front bumper... :: At this point I don't feel like scratching the paint on the valance to weasel it out.
 

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HA!
Your timing is impecable! I have just been struggling with getting the stupid battery terminals loose on my Explorer; nothing is correct, 1/2, 7/16, 12mm...AAAaauugh! :: ::
 

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Hey, I'm a little younger than you, Dan. I remember in school them trying to teach us Metric along with English measurements. It must have been that same year.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's that bolt I was showing you when you visited Britton. The only way I could get it was with a short socket, a very long extension, a universal joint, and the air impact wrench, laying on my back jamming the tools up between the tranny and the tunnel.

Hey, if you need weird combinations of tools to get at those bumper bolts, I got em!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was in Engineering school in the early 80's. They were pretty sure the country was going metric, so all my classes were in metric units. Then I graduated and entered the real world and promptly forgot all that metric stuff!

Overall, I far prefer the metric system, but ONLY if it's all metric!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey, maybe there's even a THIRD measurement system they threw in there to totally frustrate us backyard mechanics. Fathoms or furlongs or fortnights or something.
 

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I ran into similar problems when trying to remove the exhaust manifold on my I6. The bolts were rounded, rusted, and some were metric. I bought a set of Craftsman's Bolt-Out, which is used for removing damaged bolts. Everyone should have set in their toolbox. It helped alot.

Justin ::
 

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I can understand the pain in this, but consider the poor guy who grows up metric and likes classic American cars or worse yet British. I tried to justify American measurements once and was soundly defeated in the logic catagory.
Barley corns and length of someones feet or arms!!??!!
After discovering the following facts I had to admit that
I was trying to justify an arbitrary and archaic system.
BRITISH MONEY!
2 Farthings = 1 Ha' penny. 2 ha'pennies=1 penny. So far so good
3 pennys= 1 Thrupence Bit.2 Thrupences = 1 Sixpence. 2 Sixpence = 1 Shilling or a Bob! 2 Bob = 1 Florin. 1 Florin and 1 Sixpence = 1 Half Crown. 4 Half crowns = Ten Bob Note.
2 Ten Bob Notes = 1 Pound (240 pennies). 1 Pound and 1 Shilling = 1 Guinea. I can understand switching, but not mixing.
Bruce (TX)
 

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Yeah I remember the ONE bolt that was holding you up from progressing any further. :(

I took off the bumper guards, and the valance so I can now get to those corner bolts a lot easier than before. Hey, if you need an extra set of hands this weekend for anything, let me know I'll be around.
 

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I think it is a marketing marvel. How else could tool manufacturers get us to buy 2 types of every type wrench? If we want deep well sockets, we buy metric and english, if we want a set of open end wrenches, we need metric and english, etc, etc.
 

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Actually, if look closer at some cheapo wrenches and sockets, you may find out that some of them are the same, just stamped differently.
5/16" =7,94 -> 8mm
7/16" =11,11 -> 11mm
5/8" =15,88 -> 16mm
3/4" =19,05 -> 19mm
7/8" =22,23 -> 22mm
15/16" =23,81 -> 24mm
 

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Is this one of the top bell housing bolts? I had a problem with a top bell housing bolt on a jeep one time.
 

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“Metric” is theoretically based upon six nearly identical iridium “meter” bars that each represents 1/1,000,000th the distance from some point in Paris, (France) to the North Pole (Artic). Metric was nice for engineers using “slide rules” since it is decimal based and all measurements can be divided or multiplied by 10 by simply moving the decimal point.

The “English” system was developed from common usage; a yard is the distance from nose to fingertip, a foot the length of your foot, and an inch being one segment of a finger, etc. and the natural relationship between those.

The great thing about all of this is we use “Arabic” numerals for both systems. I prefer the English system because I only work on old cars and I can accurately estimate a bolt or nut size by sight. Metric leaves me a little baffled; I have a tough time guessing to the nearest millimeter.
 

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The only english measurement on the Explorer is the belt tensioner...everything else is metric.

Slade
 

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Actually, the meter is defined as the distance light travels in a vacuum during 1/299 792 458 of a second ;)
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of classic Jeeps! Back then they were the b#$ch of the auto industry. Everyone made parts for them.
 
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