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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking of adding a furnace to the garage for the up coming winter and I have a line on a couple of them, but I'm just not sure which type to buy. The garage is slightly larger than a 2 car garage.
Should I use a down draft or up draft?
I have easy access for venting, gas line and power.
Any helpful suggestions???

Thank you
 

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Holy smokes fella. I haven't even bought my back to school pens and pencils and you're thinking Winter :: :: :p But come Fall get a down draft :)
 

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Maybe this is what you are talking about, but have you looked into a radient heat system. Your air temp may stay cool but everything you touch, including yourself, will be warm. I worked in one and it was great.
 

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I have a 24x30 attached garage and heat it with overhead radiant gas heat, IMO its far superioir to anything that blows air around.. Very comfortable heat. I liked it so much I swapped my homes heat to hot water radiant heated floors.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Didn't mean to scare everyone out there....
I figure it's nice out so why not install it now, but the one I found is an up draft so that won't work...
Going to get the Suburban on Saturday no thanks to Bank One and the idiots that work there.
 

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After 4 houses, and many winter nights freezing my nuts off in the garage, I installed radiant floor heat in the garage of my new house. I couldnt express in words the joy of a warm floor in the middle of a Chicago winter.
Retrofitting radiant into and existing floor cant be cheap so go with a downdraft.
 

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Typically a down draft furnace is used when the structure has a crawl space beneath the floor. Ductwork is routed to floor vents from the down flow furnace. Or if you are have new construction on a concrete slab, the duct work can be installed in the concrete floor. Since you have existing construction on a slab, an updraft furnace is your only choice. But this will heat the air high in the building and leave the floor area cold.
 

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Actualy he can use a down draft unit, he would have to have a base and registers for it but it will work.
He could also put it in a corner and run some duct work along the wall just above the floor the length of the garage and put registers in the duct.
If he only has the 2 choice's between the up or down , I would go with the down flow and run some duct work against the wall above floor level.
It would then at least blow the warm air across the flor and rise natualy , this is a much better solution then trying to blow warm air down to the floor.

Gary
 

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go with a radiant gas heater. mine keeps my 3 car garage at an easy 60 degrees during the winter,and it doesnt need venting.and gas use is very low. i could keep it even warmer but i like it at about 60. ::
 

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I have a 55k btu radiant propane heater in mine.
It works most excellent!!!
www.longbros.com/richjr you might see a glimpse of it over my car project.
 

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I put a down draft furnace in my garage, works well. I just let it blow out the botton, no ducting. It sits about 18" off the floor in a steel frame I made out of angle iron.
Check out the clearance specs before buying a radiant tube heater. Tthose can not go up against anything flamable. You have to leave yourself some headroom.
 

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That's the EXACT same unit I run in my garage - keep it set to 55 all winter too and when I'm working out there setting it to 70 makes my oversized two car too hot...

-bob
 
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