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Discussion Starter #1
When I took off my carb I found a pool of oil on the intake manifold under where the carb spacer attaches. It doesn't leak from there. The only way I found it was by taking off the carb. It's on the drivers side only. Is this problem?

Here's a picture if you want to take a look

Thanks,
Dave

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The only way to get oil up there that I can think of is through the breather hose from the driver's side valve cover to air cleaner. Does you valve cover have a baffle in it? I wouldn't think this is a serious problem, but woud sure make the car run like crap if that oil is being dumped into the carb.

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I am thinking what John is thinking. My valve cover has a baffle inside under where the PCV valve goes which would keep oil from splashing into the tube.

BTW - how do you do the cool thing with your signature?

Dan
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I only have the PCV valve on the passenger side valve cover that connects to the carb spacer. It rattles when I shake it. I don't recall if there's a baffle on the passenger side valve cover. Could it be coming from there?

I'm only getting about 10 MPG with the 289 2V right now so the car isn't operating at it's peak. I found this when I took the carb off for rebuilding.

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It would be easy to check, Dave. Take out the PCV valve and either look down in the hole with a flashlight or stick a screwdriver down in there. If you hit some "tin" resistance, you probably have a baffle. If the screwdriver hits "iron" or "steel" resistance, you are probably hitting a rocker arm or the rocker arm shaft.

These resistance terms (tin, iron and steel) are very technical; to be used only by professionals. Do not try this at home!

Dan
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One way to tell if it's the PCV is to pull the hose off at the carb and see if there is oil in the line. A worn valve guide can cause the same problem, but it would have to be pretty bad. Has the engine been rebuilt? I have also seen this occur after a rebuild if the valve guides have been knurled and the machine shop used the stock valve seals. What the knurl does is form a spiral groove all the way from top to bottom in an effort to shrink the guide back to the original size, but it also makes a track for oil to work it's way down the stem and into the port. But if a positive style seal is used, it usually solves the problem. I hope this helps you out, Scott

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Discussion Starter #9
I looked in the PCV hose and found that there is oil in there. I also couldn't find the baffle in the valve cover when I poked in there with a screwdriver.

I'll install a new PCV valve and drive around a while with the spare carb attached while I rebuild the original one. When I go t put the original back on I'll check things again and take further action if it's not fixed.

Thanks for your help.
-Dave

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