Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Premium Member
1965 Mustang, 302, C4 and 9 inch
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 65 came with the oil sending unit, with no wire attached. But, by some miracle, the oil light will come on occasionally. That's a whole other thread.
Back to the oil line routing. The line itself looks like overcooked spaghetti and I hate to drape that all over the engine bay. What have some of you done?

Oil Line.jpg
Oil Pressure.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,246 Posts
You could use a braided stainless steel line which would be reliable and safe. However, I would suggest going with a full-sweep electric gauge. Those are more expensive than other gauges, but I think they're worth it. Much easier to route wires than oil lines. No chance of leaks.
 

·
Premium Member
1965 Mustang, 302, C4 and 9 inch
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #5

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,424 Posts
My racecar has a -4 braided line and I really like it as the larger diameter hose is very sensitive to pressure changes unlike the small plastic/nylon hose. I use the stock oil pressure gauge for the oil temp in the pan by hooking it to a water temp sender screwed into the pan. I have has electric gauges fail in the past and they are also slow reacting.
Randy
 
  • Like
Reactions: amccue

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
If you're going to stick with a mechanical gauge, I'd definitely install an isolator to keep the oil out of the cabin.
 
  • Like
Reactions: amccue

·
Premium Member
1965 Mustang, 302, C4 and 9 inch
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
If you're going to stick with a mechanical gauge, I'd definitely install an isolator to keep the oil out of the cabin.
Isolator? I'm drawing a blank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,812 Posts
The nylon tubing is problematic only if you're sloppy and leave it lying about where it can get too hot or abraded. Run it along the top of the valve cover with the wiring harness and zip tie every 4 ~ 5 inches. Use a grommet where it goes through the firewall. If you want the ultimate in protection, slide it through a length of vacuum tubing.

The only time I every had an issue was when a float stuck resulting in a carb fire. It melted the tubing and I had a stream of hot oil shooting across the engine compartment. As a quick fix, I loosened a valve cover and stuck the hose in between the head and the VC gasket. Drove it like that for a couple days until I bought new tubing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: amccue

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
Isolator? I'm drawing a blank.
They are a bit pricey, I would just use braided SS line. I would never use plastic, and especially not Copper, but the minimal cost of braided line is well worth it IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,823 Posts
IMHO, with the accuracy of the e-gauges being excellent, I really don't like running a line into the engine compartment (for a street engine) just to gen oil PSI..... if the line fails, you have a lot of damage on the interior. IMHO, nor worth it....Racing yes!!!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: amccue

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,103 Posts
Fifteen years ago, I was very skeptical of plastic/nylon OP line, if even in the engine department, I ran copper. However, even copper, over time "may" (according to some) crack. Last winter, 15-16 years later, I replaced the copper line with a high grade braided line in the engine compartment. AutoMeter has the line in a couple lengths.
 
  • Like
Reactions: amccue

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,847 Posts
If I were to install a mechanical oil pressure gauge I would run a 1/8" steel hard line down the oil pan rail, using line clamps attached to a few oil pan bolts to secure the line, then run it along the bellhousing flange with another bracket at the rear of the engine somewhere. From THERE I'd go with braided line to a bulkhead connector and inside the car again with 1/8" steel to the gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,829 Posts
If it's tucked into the clips along with the electrical harness, no one will notice it, especially if you ditch the white hose for some black hose. Or better, copper line.
 
  • Like
Reactions: amccue

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
If it's tucked into the clips along with the electrical harness, no one will notice it, especially if you ditch the white hose for some black hose. Or better, copper line.
Copper is a worse idea than Nylon, at work I see Copper work harden and break from vibration and flexing all the time. As mentioned, the main downfall of nylon is contacting something hot, and vulnerability to mechanical damage.
Any of the options will work out fine 99% of the time, but why risk being that 1% ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,748 Posts
I used dash 4 also. If you measure you can sometimes find a pre made piece on eBay pretty cheaply.
 
  • Like
Reactions: amccue

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,829 Posts
Copper is a worse idea than Nylon, at work I see Copper work harden and break from vibration and flexing all the time. As mentioned, the main downfall of nylon is contacting something hot, and vulnerability to mechanical damage.
Any of the options will work out fine 99% of the time, but why risk being that 1% ?
Well, you'd be wrong. All Corvettes had copper or steel line from the early 50's until the 70's. I have never seen one break.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Been using the nylon line for years. If it does fail they are easy to pinch off (bend it back on itself) and stop the oil. A paper clip will do. Ran mine underneath the export brace and into the cabin stewart- warner gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,829 Posts
Yep, when the Corvette stopped using metal tube, they switched to nylon. The only problem with nylon is it might be damaged by contact with the exhaust system, something that is massively easy to avoid, by simply running it along the wiring harness on top of the engine, to the firewall. Shelby American did this with the 65 and 67 Shelby (and the Cobra), I have not heard any stories about these cars spraying oil on the occupants of the car.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top