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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon I’m new to the site. Looking for a little advice not sure if this is the right place to ask this question.
mom wondering what oil you use in my 66 convertible with a 289. It was rebuilt a few year back and tucked away in the corral and didn’t get out much. Any preferred oil products recommended.
Thanks in advance. Just bought it so first change for me.
 

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There are many, many threads on this topic. Reading them will make your head spin, so I'll open up by saying it's not all that important what type, brand, weight. What is important is that the oil contains an adequate amount of ZDDP or zinc. This is needed for the pushrod/flat-tappet engines we have in our cars. Oil used to more universally contain it, but now it's more in the world of specialty products. I've found that the easiest ones to find in my area are: Valvoline VR1 racing oil in a 20W50 weight--this is a conventional oil that's aimed at racing engines and also specifies that is is intended for flat-tappet engines. And, If you want to go synthetic, Mobil-1 15W50 seems to be around in most local stores in my parts as well. I've been using the Mobil-1 on my engines after an initial break-in period with conventional. There are some purported advantages of synthetic oil, but I'm not sure I ever appreciate them. My cars get new oil at least once a driving season. I have 6 classics to divide my driving time among, so none gets too many miles a year on it.

If you want to go with another type of oil that you don't know the zinc content of, or know that it does not have any of that in it, they also make a ZDDP additive that you can put in on an oil change. This is just you adding the zinc vs. the oil manufacturer. Totally fine to do that, and it gives you some more latitude on oil weights, brands. I've used the Lucas Oil version many times with no issues. If memory serves, you need to subtract the equivalent amount of oil to avoid overfilling, but other than that, it's an easy addition.
 

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Yeah, another oil thread ;)
But I feel you. I asked myself the same question after I bought my car. Rebuild with a flat tapped or roller? This will influence how much ZDDP is needed. I used to run the Mobil1 15W50 too. Local Walmart has it for cheap. However my engine designer suggested to switch to VR1 10W-30 racing oil.
Both are high zink oils and will fit your needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There are many, many threads on this topic. Reading them will make your head spin, so I'll open up by saying it's not all that important what type, brand, weight. What is important is that the oil contains an adequate amount of ZDDP or zinc. This is needed for the pushrod/flat-tappet engines we have in our cars. Oil used to more universally contain it, but now it's more in the world of specialty products. I've found that the easiest ones to find in my area are: Valvoline VR1 racing oil in a 20W50 weight--this is a conventional oil that's aimed at racing engines and also specifies that is is intended for flat-tappet engines. And, If you want to go synthetic, Mobil-1 15W50 seems to be around in most local stores in my parts as well. I've been using the Mobil-1 on my engines after an initial break-in period with conventional. There are some purported advantages of synthetic oil, but I'm not sure I ever appreciate them. My cars get new oil at least once a driving season. I have 6 classics to divide my driving time among, so none gets too many miles a year on it.

If you want to go with another type of oil that you don't know the zinc content of, or know that it does not have any of that in it, they also make a ZDDP additive that you can put in on an oil change. This is just you adding the zinc vs. the oil manufacturer. Totally fine to do that, and it gives you some more latitude on oil weights, brands. I've used the Lucas Oil version many times with no issues. If memory serves, you need to subtract the equivalent amount of oil to avoid overfilling, but other than that, it's an easy addition.
Thanks so much for the insight. Just picked up the Valvoline VR-1. Now my 11 year old is going to perform his first oil change. awesome again thanks.
Yeah, another oil thread ;)
But I feel you. I asked myself the same question after I bought my car. Rebuild with a flat tapped or roller? This will influence how much ZDDP is needed. I used to run the Mobil1 15W50 too. Local Walmart has it for cheap. However my engine designer suggested to switch to VR1 10W-30 racing oil.
Both are high zink oils and will fit your needs.
Yeah it’s been a while for me. I appreciate the help. It’s fun to let your 11 yr old help with the oil changes and be able to tell his buddy’s that we’re running Valvoline racing oil in mustang. Lol. He asked if it had a racing engine. That’s all I needed to hear.
 

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I use the Valvoline racing oil and the Lucas additive as well since I don't drive Diane every day. No worries so far.
 

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Still waiting for more posts on which oils are actually damaging to engine parts. The only ones I can find so far are involving high ZDDP and/or racing oils.
 

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Still waiting for more posts on which oils are actually damaging to engine parts. The only ones I can find so far are involving high ZDDP and/or racing oils.
Racing oils are damaging to engine parts? Well, that's a whole new religion.
 

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ARE there posts saying some kind of oil actually damages engines? I mean old Ford engines, not the guy who put 20W/50 in his Prius and stuff like that. (A Gen 1 Prius can be VERY picky about oil changes.)
 

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Synthetic oil in an early flat tappet motor is not a good idea. Synthetic oil in a flat tappet motor does not allow the lifter to spin properly in its bore thus wearing it out..
If it were me I would switch to a hydraulic roller cam. There are a lot of advantages to it and well worth the money to do it..
 

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I use Valvoline VR1 10W-30 in my '66 (even though my motor is an '85 5.0HO). It's the recommended viscosity for a small block Ford with factory bearing clearances and, despite claims to the contrary, contains enough ZDDP.

From Valvoline's own website:

Valvoline VR1 Racing Oil contains .13 percent zinc and .12 percent phosphorus compared to the Valvoline "Not Street Legal" Racing Oil, which contains .14 percent zinc and .13 percent phosphorus.

That's 1300 zinc and 1200 phosphorus for those who struggle with percents... LOL.

Yes, I recommend higher zinc and phosphorus even with a "roller motor". Why? These additives chemically bond with the surface metal to form a layer of protection against frictional loads caused by metal surfaces sliding against one another. Typically, people think of this as camshaft lobes against lifters. However, also consider....

Rocker arms against fulcrums, Pushrod tips against rocker arms, rocker arms against valve tips, valve stems against guides, piston rings against cylinder walls, bearings against journals, timing chains against sprockets.... etc.
 

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Synthetic oil in an early flat tappet motor is not a good idea. Synthetic oil in a flat tappet motor does not allow the lifter to spin properly in its bore thus wearing it out.
Do you have references for this? Thanks.
 

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"Synthetic oil in a flat tappet motor does not allow the lifter to spin properly in its bore " OK, I have to say I've never heard that one before.
 

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Do you have references for this? Thanks.
+1 for the reference.
I heard people saying don’t run synthetic during break in and the first miles, but not later.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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ARE there posts saying some kind of oil actually damages engines? I mean old Ford engines, not the guy who put 20W/50 in his Prius and stuff like that. (A Gen 1 Prius can be VERY picky about oil changes.)
Not to convert the choir just a reminder that nearly any oil isn't the same as it was 10-15 years ago.
I was alluding to that most any oil is "fine" and the posts like "I used wal-mart brand oil and my engine froze up" dont really exist. (actually the WM gets very high ratings) +make the newb do some real reading beyond a forum thread where one will learn that the ZDDP levels are not really lower in most oils than the 60-70's oils and the ZDDP fact/sales pitch is mostly for "built" engines with upped cams and higher than average spring pressures or the replacements that are used instead of ZDDP that are just as effective for extreme pressures and becoming more widely used and becoming less costly.
As far as what actually will damage an engine, even an old Ford- corrosion. Fuel contamination, combustion by-products, H2O AND some boosted ZDDP levels = Acidity+less detergents/dispersants= corrosion. Will in matter in a year or 10-20 years? IDK.
Racing oils do not have the additive package to properly address those issues.
Not religion, its science. Even Joe Gibbs' Driven will preach it. Racing oil is for racing.

Don't even bother to read about things Chlorinated like Prolong or Duralube.
 
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