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1966 mustang coupe
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I may be able to get my hands on an never ran 6007-C347 engine from a friend who never did his project, he bought it brand new in 2005.

Tempted to buy it for my '66 coupe.


Kept it in a shed for years and he want to get rid of it now.

What would guys check first on such an engine?

I am worried about rust and dry gaskets etc...

Let me know what you guys think.

Thanks!


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1966 mustang coupe
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563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First thing I would do is see if will turn over by hand.
Yeah it was turning last time i spoke to him, its been a while so ill check back with him :)

^ that and at the very least take the heads off to see if the cylinder walls have any surface rust, or take the oil pan off and check from the bottom and that way you can check the crank too.
I tought about removing both heads and the oil pan at minimum yes.
 

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65 Coupe / Family owned since 21 APR 1964
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Cool,
But yep - I would agree with all of the above. So how’s the year around humidity where you’re at?
You could even go just pull the valve covers off - if you find rust there its almost a given it will be deeper. But a little could require just a good cleaning.
Borescope would be great. The one thing, I’m not sure I would “rotate” it beyond maybe an 1/8th turn just to ensure it’s free. If purchased I would probably break it completely down to check and clean everything. Reassemble, lubricating all like a new build etc. Then again looking it over in person would dictate how pristine or other it is and determine how deep a “do-over” I felt would be best etc.
 

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I would have a hard time passing up on that motor, but it depends on the price. Certainly would try to turn it over by hand and inspect it with a bore scope. I'd probably pull the rocker covers and oil pan just to look since I'd go ahead and replace those gaskets anyway. I'd also put a new rear main seal in it. Use the Fel Pro perma dry blue silicone ones and the Ford Performance rear seal. I might also put a micro sleeve on the crank.

 
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Do as Woodchuck says and it should work out well. Nice find!

Don't go "Roadkill Style" and add gas to a engine that's been sitting for 20 years and drive it. They usually end up replacing the engine in those cars.
 

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As a point of reference, this is my freshly rebuilt 289 after sitting for 20ish years waiting for me to install it. Yes, pull the heads and inspect and clean.
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1. Remove HEI distributor and place in trash bin

2. Remove camshaft

3. Clean old, dried lube from cam

4. Remove cylinder heads

5. Inspect and clean valves and combustion chambers

6. Inspect, clean and lubricate cylinders

7. Remove connecting rod caps

8. Remove main caps

9. Remove crankshaft

10. Inspect, clean and lubricate main bearings

11. Clean and lubricate rear main seal

12. Reinstall crankshaft and main caps. Torque to spec

13. Inspect, clean and lubricate rod bearings

14. Reinstall rod end caps. Torque to spec

15. Reinstall cylinder heads. Torque to spec

16. Lube and reinstall cam

17. Reassemble valve train

18. DEGREE THE CAM!

19. Install intake manifold

20. Install refreshed and calibrated Autolite distributor or high-quality aftermarket example with new, neatly routed plug wires

21. Install engine in car

22. Install carburetor

23. Connect all necessary plumbing and wiring and pour in engine oil of your choice

24. Install new battery

25. Prime carburetor

26. Say a few prayers

27. Throw salt over your left shoulder

28. Crank the engine and let 'er rip!

29. Follow cam break-in procedures exactly

30. Break down and cry (either tears of joy or sobs of sorrow depending on results)
 

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1,208 Posts
1. Remove HEI distributor and place in trash bin

2. Remove camshaft

3. Clean old, dried lube from cam

4. Remove cylinder heads

5. Inspect and clean valves and combustion chambers

6. Inspect, clean and lubricate cylinders

7. Remove connecting rod caps

8. Remove main caps

9. Remove crankshaft

10. Inspect, clean and lubricate main bearings

11. Clean and lubricate rear main seal

12. Reinstall crankshaft and main caps. Torque to spec

13. Inspect, clean and lubricate rod bearings

14. Reinstall rod end caps. Torque to spec

15. Reinstall cylinder heads. Torque to spec

16. Lube and reinstall cam

17. Reassemble valve train

18. DEGREE THE CAM!

19. Install intake manifold

20. Install refreshed and calibrated Autolite distributor or high-quality aftermarket example with new, neatly routed plug wires

21. Install engine in car

22. Install carburetor

23. Connect all necessary plumbing and wiring and pour in engine oil of your choice

24. Install new battery

25. Prime carburetor

26. Say a few prayers

27. Throw salt over your left shoulder

28. Crank the engine and let 'er rip!

29. Follow cam break-in procedures exactly

30. Break down and cry (either tears of joy or sobs of sorrow depending on results)
That’s an MSD distributor, not an HEI.
 

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67 Fastback T5, 331 stroker, TCI Frt End, Canted 4 link rear, 3.55 gears
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Is complete disassembly necessary, or would inspection with a bore scope, and pulling oil pan and valve covers tell you what you need to know? The PDF sheet says the engine was hot tested with 20w-50 oil which it was shipped with, so I wouldn't think assembly lube is an issue.
 

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Is complete disassembly necessary, or would inspection with a bore scope, and pulling oil pan and valve covers tell you what you need to know? The PDF sheet says the engine was hot tested with 20w-50 oil which it was shipped with, so I wouldn't think assembly lube is an issue.
At the very least, the cam lube is dried up and useless.
 
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