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Opentracker,
On an earlier post you said you were planning on using fiberglass rear leaf springs on your next project.

Have you seen the "shredding from the side loads"? I have read that the Hyperco composite springs flex (laterally) and they recommend a panhard/watts set up. However, I have read that the Flex-a-Forms gave very little side play.

I don't mind adding a panhard to my rear suspension but Maier recommends that you use rubber bushings in the rear with a panhard. I was going to use GW delalum bushings to limit roll, now I will need a rear sway bar. The rear end is starting to get a lot more complicated. Maybe I should stick with steel leafs and solid bushings.

What is your planned set up?
Panhard or Watts?
Bushing type, front/rear?
Sway bar?
 

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I have herd that the ends of fiberglass leafs will come apart with a lot of side load. I am going to make my own Watts Link for my project and use solid bushings with the glass leafs. I'm going to try a sway bar but the car may not need one. A panhard bar moves the rear end in an arch unlike a Watts Link, so if you had solid bushings in the leafs there would be some binding. I would think that's why Maier says to use rubber bushings in the rear with a panhard bar. You want some type of axle locator on a track car. Solid bushings in steel or glass leafs will not do it on thier own IMO. If you used fiberglass leafs with a solid front and rubber rear bushing set up and a panhard bar, you may not need a rear sway bar. You could try one to see if it helps or hurts. I'm sure I'll be doing a lot of testing to find out what works best.

John
 

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You want some type of axle locator on a track car. Solid bushings in steel or glass leafs will not do it on thier own IMO.
John
Any idea how much just urethane front eye bushings help locating the rear axle? Certainly, they are better than rubber.


If you used fiberglass leafs with a solid front and rubber rear bushing set up and a panhard bar, you may not need a rear sway bar. You could try one to see if it helps or hurts. I'm sure I'll be doing a lot of testing to find out what works best.

John
Hmm, just thinking aloud. Wouldn't we try to use panhard bar not only to locate axle but also lower the roll center. Lower roll center (besides helping with roll axis) increases rear roll which you could control with rear anti-roll bar, right?
 

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The urethane is much better than rubber. A solid bushing is better than that but they don't stop the rear end from floating under the car durring hard cornering.



Most people have found that no sway bar works better for them. I like using a rear sway bar. Snap oversteer is a problem with a rear sway bar. We run radial tires and I like to drive on the edge before the rear end wants to slid. Two ways to go here, either you like the car to slide around the corners or grip around the corners. I have an adjustable rear bar for my project. I'll give it a go with the adjustments and then try it without one. The adjustable panhard bar is a good way to go. Some of the forum members have noted that as little as 1/4" change in mounting height will change the way the car feels. Adjustability is the way to go IMO. Adjustable shocks, sway bar and panhard bar should give enouph room for different track conditions.



John
 
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