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Discussion Starter #1
I have a decision to make concerning my car, and I would be interested to hear what you all think about it. I originally bought my '67 thinking it would be a real daily driver. Then I saw the rotten floors and old suspension and bad brakes, and started to tear it apart and start replacing things. Well, obviously I couldn't drive it while I was doing all that, so I stopped thinking it was going to be my everyday car. The further I got into the car, however, the more obvious it became that it really wasn't a car I, or much of anyone else, would want to spend the time and money totally restoring. It's a 6cyl coupe that's as plain as they come.

Now that I've said some of the bad things about it (/forums/images/icons/wink.gif) I'd like to add that it isn't ready to be scrapped either. The car is fairly solid, but soooo very not straight. It's got rust here and there on the body metal, but the frame is in pretty good shape. It's also a bit crooked in front I think, and that throws off the sheetmetal alignment, particularly the hood. Paint's not great, but I suppose it could be worse.

So, rambling completed, here's the thing. My daily car is finally making an exit, and I have to decide what's going to happen to the Mustang. I've narrowed my choices down to two things right now based on all the other factors that affect my car situation.

One, I can sell the Mustang I have now and probably get back most of what I've put into at this point. I can take that money and buy a driver and save the rest of it for a Mustang later on that would be worth the restoration effort that I would love to put into it. As to when that would happen--who knows.

Or two, I spend a couple grand more on the Mustang to convert to power brakes, get a new steering box, and freshen up the engine and transmission, and use it as a real daily driver. I would also need to replace the front and rear windshield seals (have the seals, just haven't done it). It's got a body I wouldn't freak out about, and it's still a very cool vintage car to drive around which is why I bought it in the first place. Then I start slowly saving up for a restoration worthy car again which will probably take me quite a long time. I should also mention though, that daily driver for me means winter driving as well. Unless I get really lucky between now and November and find enough money to buy a little crappy car to drive when it got bad--probably not likely, but I suppose anything's possible.

So...any thoughts?
 

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I'm sure you know that it's not cost efficient to restore a Mustang. You'll have no other transportation, and it doesn't sound to me that this car is ready to be a reliable dd. I think, given your situation, I'd sell. Hate to say that. Buy a better condition 'stang when you can, or a good restoration candidate when you can afford both a dd (of some sort) and a Mustang "worth" restoring.

Steve
 

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You know what they say about opinions.*G* So here goes. You've done a fair amount of work already; just for the pure satisfaction of it wouldn't you like to see it finished?
Now for the practical; a reliable daily driver is almost a necessity and although this could be one, only you know what you need and what it will take this one to get there. (But wouldn't you like to see this one finished *G*)
Good luck
 

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I'd keep it. I was thinking about selling my Mustang early in the restoration process but I love it now that its done! /forums/images/icons/smile.gif Put the money you have into the necessities, rust and engine. Power brakes/steering isnt a necessity. Ive been driving my stang for a while now and have completely forgot about the loss of power brakes/steering from my previous car. Selling it isnt the worse option but you have a 6cyl like I do. I would never be able to get back what I put into it. From the description of your car, having rust and a non-straight body, I wouldnt expect a lot of money in return. My .02 cents

Mike
 

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Keep it and work on the basics. Reliable brakes and steering do not need to be powered. Learn to weld and fix/replace rusted pieces. Clean the underside and apply some undercoating, I've never been to North Dakota but I believe it snows there? right?
If you buy a cheap car for a DD would it be more reliable than the Mustang? My cheap DD that I let the kids drive is on it's second radiator in a year and last month was major brake repair time. Last year we had the auto trans rebuilt etc. I may have to do these things to a DD mustang but I would feel better about it!
 

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I suggest you look realistically at how much it's going to cost to get the coupe to daily driver status, then see what your other options for that amount of money are. For example, if the total of what you have into it now plus what needs to be done is, say, $6000, you might find that you could buy a much nicer, more solid coupe for that amount. If you really think you could sell it now for what you've got into it, the decision becomes a no brainer.

Of course, sentimental attachment to your particular coupe may throw the above logic right out the window!
 

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MY first reaction (if it were mine /forums/images/icons/smile.gif) would be keep it and fix it, no matter how long it takes or how much it cost.

But.................if I new I had to have a DD (and we all do), I would be forced to sell the Stang even if I lost a few $$$, find realiable transportation, then go find the Stang that I would prefer to restore/restomod.

It would be like putting the old family dog to sleep. Even though you know it was for the best it would still be hard and painful to do /forums/images/icons/frown.gif. But then when the new puppy (pony) arrives the pain quickly fades and only the memories remain. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just felt like replying to all of the input /forums/images/icons/smile.gif. I may have made the car sound worse than it is to some degree. The body would require a fair amount of tedious bodywork to be anywhere near perfect, which is why I see it as a good possible dd. I wouldn't worry about it at all, but I would still be able to do enough general maintenance to slow down the rust that's developing, and in those areas a little more rust isn't really going to matter because even now to really fix it I'd have to cut and replace the metal. Also, as far as the mechanical aspects of the car go, it is fairly solid. I have some wiring issues I have to clean up either way, but otherwise the engine's pretty strong--just burns a fair amount of oil, something I'm pretty sure I can take care of. I'd also like to rebuild the transimssion just because I don't know the history of it, and I want to be able to rely on that to. As for the brakes, if it has any chance of becoming a winter car (ice, ice, and more ice) I would feel much more comfortable with power drums. Also, I just want to replace the manual steering box with a new one, not go power, the box is just very tired.

Huh. I know that jumping in to defend the car should be a sign of something, but I'm not sure what. I'm not even sure I'm that attached to it. I mean, I've done alot of work to the car already and learned even more than that from working on it, but part of me seriously dislikes this particular '67 coupe /forums/images/icons/tongue.gif. But on the other hand, what's made me dislike it is everything that wasn't done correctly or maintained before I got it. Since the work I've already done has taken car of alot of that I guess I don't have much left to be surprised by.

Maybe when it gets down to it, what I'm saying is that I know this car. And that makes me want to keep going with it one minute and run away from it as fast as I can the next minute /forums/images/icons/tongue.gif. Heh...if I don't make a decision soon I think what I'll need is a horse and a new place to live where everything is in walking distance....

And thanks for all the input guys /forums/images/icons/smile.gif.
 

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Christina,
I was stationed in GFAFB in the 80's. Loved the duty (except for working on the flightline at anything warmer than -50 wind chill). The locals treated us well. Kudo's to you nodaks!
I've been restoring my 69 Mach 1 s-code for the past five years (on and off effort).
First off, if your figuring it will be a "couple thousand" to finish, better figure doubling any first estimate (voice of experience).
Second - the better your starting point, the nicer the finished product will be.
Sell it (sorry, don't mean to cause any pain), get a good daily driver (with an excellent heater, I drove a VW bug there!), start on the savings, and search for a sound body of the year/type that appeals to you the most.
Don't work your behind off on something that is not your first pick out of the stable!
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I love '67 coupes--it's my favorite body style (followed closely by 65-66 fastbacks, and 69-70 sportsroofs /forums/images/icons/wink.gif).

I'm just not sure I'm in love with the little troublemaker that I actually own. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 

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I'm willing to bet that everyone has the love/hate relationship with our mustangs.

Stick it out a bit. Buy a good DD (Honda, Toyota, Focus, whatever), and work on the mustang at your leisure. It is supposed to be a hobby, right? Treat it as such.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ok, I know I'm starting to sound like a whiny broken record that can't make up her mind here, but that's part of why I'm actually considering this transition (the working at my leisure thing--not the whiny thing /forums/images/icons/wink.gif.) I don't think this car is really worth slowly putting together. It pains me to say it, but the PO might have been onto something when he said it was for driving--although doing so in the condition I bought it was maybe not the best idea.

You know, I think this idea to ask for suggestions totally backfired on me. Here I was hoping you'd all say "keep it", and then I'd be like "...well...I don't know....," and instead you're all tricking me into defending holding onto it by making me think that keeping it would be more difficult. And yes, reverse psychology does still work on me. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif/forums/images/icons/tongue.gif
 

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Not at all... we just all want to buy a '67, cheap.

No, seriously, we ARE trying to help. Most of us. If you had other transportation I'd say keep it, hands down.

Steve
 

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I don't think this car is really worth slowly putting together.

Is it the individual car itself that you're wrestling with? Let me tell you something. Midlife (the car) is only a 66 mustang, and it has some rotten aspects to it. I've got way more money into it that it is worth, but that isn't important to me. I don't care all that much about THE car. But, I'm learning an awful lot, learning new skills, making new friends, learning all sorts of things that pay off for household repairs, and I'm saving money at the same time (well, I like to tell myself that when I don't pay mechanics, plumbers, or electricians anymore). To me, the restoration process is what's important, and I can't put a price on that.

If you want to learn these skills, follow my advice and get a reliable DD, and work on the 'stang at your liesure. Whether it is a beat-up old inliner, or a POS V8, who cares? It's the process of restoration that counts, not the end result. Don't confuse the two. Most of us would like the perfect marriage of the two, but life doesn't work out that way. The more important part is the process/journey, not the destination.
 

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Well said, Mid!

(Although "only a 66" indeed! Mustangs have a mystique all their own, no matter the year, no matter the body style.)

Steve
 

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I would not keep it as a daily driver. Maybe for a few months of the year. But trying to drive one of these old beasts in the snow and cold would be terrible. I would either sell it, and wait for another one. Or keep it, and buy another inexpensive cars to drive around in. Keep in mind, there are thousands of classic mustangs available, so you can always replace it. And on your next one, you will be more selective as to what you liked and did not like about the coupe you have now.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Gosh...you guys make way too much sense. I'm not saying I've actually made up my mind yet, but you guys have all given me alot to think about. Just wanted to let you know that I appreciate it. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 
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