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Discussion Starter #1
As the new owner of an early 1967 Mustang I'd like to replace the manual steering with power steering and a collapsible column (for safety reasons), but keep costs to a minimum. What are my options? Is it possible to install the PS components and steering column from a '68 / '69 Mustang or Cougar? (My understanding is that 68+ have collapsible columns.) I've never owned a classic car other than the ones I drove in the 70's, and back then they weren't classics. Thanks for your input. jp
 

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In a wreck the steering column is the least of your worries. Ford built millions and millions of cars and trucks with the spear-o-matic columns. Somehow, people have survived and continue to survive driving them. Me, being in that group.

Your best bet for PS is to suck it up and drop the $1000 on a Borgeson kit or fab up an electric system off a JY Prius.
 

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By the time the solid column would be a issue in a accident, that would be the least of your problems. You will already have substantial injuries. GM were front steer car with the steering box right behind the bumper. Anything more then a light impact it would be well on it's way to your chest. Fords and Mustangs are rear steer with the box behind the wheel and just in front of the fire wall. For a impact to reach that would be a very significant impact. Collapsible column or not you are going to have serious injuries. The solid shaft doesn't bother me.

The factory power steering box is 16:1 and the manual is generally 19:1 unless it's a GT package or has been optioned with it. With assisted 19:1 you may find it too slow unless you changed to the PS box or went to a Borgeson kit. Personally I love the feel the manual 16:1 box provides. Great road feed back. I run a fair amount of caster too. There is a art to driving a manual steer car. Always make sure tires are properly inflated and always be moving even the slightest amount helps significantly when parking.
 

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It's not just Mustangs. Virtually EVERY car built prior to 1/1/68 had a solid steering shaft. GM, Ford, Chrysler, AMC Rambler, Studebaker, Hudson, Packard, etc. AND all the imports. Somehow people, today, seem to be waaaay over-the-top about all the missing safety features...... Funny, though.... haven't run into anybody (yet) complaining about the rigid steering column in their Model T....
 

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Were I to tackle the project I would go with the 68 style column and box. The brake and clutch pedals may have to be change out also as the 68 column's squish section is quite big in diameter compared to the 67. All of this will bolt in making it an easy swap.

As previous posts have mentioned, the full length shaft is probably the least of your worries in a 67 mustang.

The easiest way to power steering is to install all the PS goodies from a 67/68 and don't worry about the box. That be said, since the box is a non power box it is probably worn out and needs attention also.

All other options require a lot of work and possibly fabrication on your part.
 

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I put a '68 steering column in my '67. Because I wanted to. The wiring harness is slightly different but was no big deal (to me). I elected to stay with manual steering, just with a newer steering gearbox. Despite everyone saying I had to change brake pedals, I didn't. I did flatten the accordion part of the column just a bit because if I held my foot just so, on purpose, I could make the pedal rub some otherwise. Now I have seen where another person did what seemed to be the exact same swap and the brake pedal arm was mashed into the column. No way around it, he had to use a '68 pedal. But there's a chance you might not need one. If so, it would save you a few dollars. While you're in there, you might want to look into a roller bearing conversion for the pedal in any case. Often the bushings are worn and need seeing to anyway. The bearing conversion will take out some side to side play and help things fit. I have no doubt that was part of what made mine work.

The latest thing in power steering has been mentioned already. An electric power steering add-on setup. I like manual steering but with the big tires I have on the front I am sorely tempted. The DIY aspect of an "EPAS" upgrade sounds fun too. There's two threads in the modified and Custom section if you want to check it out. The first is focused more on a GM setup and the second thread is more about using the parts from some Asian cars. I believe the Asian one is percolating up right now. Should be easy to spot.
 

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I change our 67 manual to 68 PS and column. Don't remember all the details, but it wasn't painful. I did have to custom the brake pedal and use the 67 column harness some reason. It helps if you have a parts car to work off of.
 

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Switching to a 68 setup is your easiest solution. The steering column is a direct swap, but u need the brackets etc. too. Early 67 cars used the same long shaft steering box as 65/66. If you have this you’ll need a new box so that will affect your choices for the power steering. Late 67 and later cars use a short shaft steering box with a rag joint . A 68 column will bolt right up to this style box. If going to power steering however u will want to upgrade the steering box.

As noted by others you basically have three options for power steering.

1. Original Ford style external Power Steering
2. Borgeson Integral Power Steering
3. Custom EPAS electric booster power steering.

I have used original Ford setups on a couple cars and have been very happy with them. I bought used setups and rebuilt them with parts and advice from Chockostang. He sells complete setups too. He also does a great job rebuilding the steering boxes.

The advantages with this option is originally and ease of finding parts, repairs etc.

The Borgeson solution is designed to use GM parts and has been adapted to the Fords. Some folks have used it and love it. Others have had lots of issues. So mixed reviews. Most with issues seem to have modified motors & exhaust so that may or may not apply to you.

Some vendors sell complete EPAS setups or you can build your own from junkyard pats, an EBay controller and some fabrication if you have the time and talent. Looks like a fun project.

As I write this I remembered I have a complete 67 power steering set up in my shed. I think I have everything except the power steering box. I also have a 68 column if you choose to go this path.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm leaning heavily to using the '68 setup as you suggest. If the '67 power steering components work with the '68 column and you're looking to sell yours', let me know what you'd want for them. I'm assuming as long as I change to a '68 column at the same time, using '67 PS components with a late '67 or '68 gearbox, it isn't an issue. Someone please let me know if this isn't correct. Otherwise I can look for '68 PS components and gearbox at the swap meet in Jefferson, WI this year as it's less than 2 hrs. from me.

There are a few other things on this early '67 Mustang (with auto on floor) I need to tackle first, but this is definitely something I'd like to get done. Thanks for your help.
 

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The 67 and 68 power steering is identical except for early. Cars that have the the long shaft steering box. Even then the only real difference is the box it self and the column.
 
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