Vintage Mustang Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As noted in a different posted, I've removed and disassembled the brake distribution block and proportioning valve in my '69 (Shelby GT350). Got the rebuild kit from West Coast Classic Cougars and will be starting reassembly soon. I'm trying to keep as much of the original stuff (Preservation not Restoration) as I can so thought I'd clean up (to re-use) the brake lines. Here's a photo of the line from the master-cylinder to the proportioning valve. As I was cleaning up the threads, I was kind of surprised to notice that the ends of the brake lines seem to be color-coded. One end is purple; the other is red. Was this something the factory did to make vehicle assembly easier (and hence, these lines are original)...or is this an aftermarket brake line?
Wood Gas Electrical wiring Wrist Personal protective equipment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
A quick identification method for the company/plant that supplied the brake lines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So these are original?
Nice!
Kind of surprised they lasted all these years.
I guess they don't make things like they used to; The ones on my 2004 F150 rotted out last year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
Are you sure you want to drive with 50 yo lines?
I just ordered a whole set of brake and fuel lines for my 70.
I feel like I'm pushing my luck every time I get in
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,589 Posts
I agree with Blues Power. The original lines were steel, and so are some of the aftermarket ones, which will rust and rot over time.
I'm in Massachusetts and live on the coast. I replaced mine with stainless steel. 50 year old lines?... I'd replace them.
Hang the old ones up in your garage. If you sell the car to a concourse nut, show them the lines and say you'll throw them in as a bonus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good comments.
I have replaced most of the brake lines under the car and the flex hoses; hadn't done the ones in the engine compartment and was surprised to find the originals were still there and not rusty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
The ones in the engine compartment usually always look good.
The heat from the motor keeps them dry on the outside
The inside can still be corroded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,150 Posts
Factory line nuts were color coded. The lines were some variety of galvanized steel.

Steel lines don't "go bad" from age. The usual culprit is rust, either from water in the brake fluid, or exterior rust from wet environments or road de-icer. If they're in good shape, then re-use them if you feel they're good. If you see a lot of rust on the inside, then replace them with a set of reproductions, which also will have color-coded line nuts and galvanized steel tubing - which will outlast you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: oldisgood

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I did a little research. The original Tinned Bundy Weld "TBW" brake lines were manufactured by Bundy Corporation and had a corrosion resistant coating called Terne coating which was a lead/tin dip process that became banned by EPA 20 years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,929 Posts
I did a little research. The original Tinned Bundy Weld "TBW" brake lines were manufactured by Bundy Corporation and had a corrosion resistant coating called Terne coating which was a lead/tin dip process that became banned by EPA 20 years ago.
You are correct, if you buy Classic Tube brake lines, they have replaced the Terne Coating with a similar looking galvanized coating that protects much better.
”Classic Tube was successful in sourcing tubing made in the USA that is SAE J 526 specification and has a "galvanized" type top coating that simulates the original Terne coating, You may also be interested in knowing the results of the ASTM B117 salt spray test was only 250 hours for the old Terne coating, This tubing has passed at 3000 hours,”
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top