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So I wanted to get some of the assembly manuals to help in the rebuilding of my Miustang. I have the Osborn Chassis Assembly manual, and was possibly looking to get the Body Assembly manual. Now i also see they have the Ford Factory manuals on CD. Any recommendations? how good are the CDs?

Thanks
Rusty
 

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I started with my Ford manual on CD. After a few years the newer OS made it non functional. Got another digital copy and the same happened. Then I bought the book. Much better. Not only does it not out date, but much easier to use in the garage. What I don't like it the images are not as crisp in the book.

Allen
 

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At least with a printed Osbourn manual, you can write in details to use later. Remember, the Osbourne manuals were printed on a certain date, things at Fomoco might have progressed.
I'd go with a printed service manual too.
 

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I went with print because I was told the e copies are just scanned pages of the printed copy and the quality isn't the same.
 

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The current CD and downloads from Forel are no longer copy protected. You can print them, use them on any computer with no additional software and copy and paste. The bummer with the download is that while it has a table of contents you can’t click directly on it to get to a section. You’ve got to scroll and it’s big. Nearly 1000 pages. If that weren’t the case I’d use it as my primary source. I’ve got a first edition print version from back then that’s pretty dog eared and I’d like to keep it as a historical piece rather than a go to manual. The quality of the PDF is as good as my original print manual. I don‘t know if that’s the same case for the newer repro manuals.

The Osborn assembly manual series are scans of originals that sometimes are barely readable. Osborn says that’s because that’s the quality of the original they had to scan. They seem like good, upstanding folks so I have no reason to doubt them. I use a lighted magnifier. If you’re doing more than just routine mechanical work I think they are a must. Those, the FSM and the Master Parts and Accessories Catalog will get you through any restoration or resto mod.
 

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I only have paper copies of the shop and assembly manuals, but PDF versions would be nice instead of having to run out to the garage to look something up when it's bugging me at 11pm.

The Osborn assembly manual series are scans of originals that sometimes are barely readable. Osborn says that’s because that’s the quality of the original they had to scan. They seem like good, upstanding folks so I have no reason to doubt them. I use a lighted magnifier. If you’re doing more than just routine mechanical work I think they are a must. Those, the FSM and the Master Parts and Accessories Catalog will get you through any restoration or resto mod.
I'd be more inclined to say they didn't have a reasonably skilled Photoshop operator to clean then up, or didn't want to invest the time (aka money) into it. I am not "skilled" but do some Photoshop work for my RC airplane hobby and have cleaned up some atrocious looking plan scans without much effort. A buddy of mine does it for a living and the stuff he does blows me away. They've also been available for 20+ years, scanning technology has progressed significantly since they were done. However, when you have the exclusive rights to a certain product, there's no incentive to improve.
 

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I'd be more inclined to say they didn't have a reasonably skilled Photoshop operator to clean then up, or didn't want to invest the time (aka money) into it.
The decal reproductions they have are top notch. A good test would be to scan a page and see if there was any way to improve it. We’ve got a higher end scanner we got for boxes and boxes of family photos dating back to the 40s. I’ll have some time on my hands for the next several months. I may give it a try. I should scan the bits I couldn’t read but between the magnifier and a grandkid in her early 20s that has good eyesight I’ve been able to get all but a few.
 

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If you're going to do a complete restoration I don't think you can have too much information. I have had the Ford Shop Manual since 69. My only problem with it is that I am allergic to dust mites, and like most old books its infected with them, making me sneeze every time I turn a page. The Digital versions I've seen are pdf and seem to be searchable for everything except the page number (whats with that?). For $17 its well worth it to me, and if I need more detail I have the printed version, but the quality is generally good, and its much faster to find something using the search feature than thumbing through 3" of paper.

Osborne manuals are all copied drawings from Ford, usually exploded views, are printed in book form and sometimes copies of what is in the Ford shop manual, but not always. There may be digital versions also, but I haven't noticed them. Their organization makes it difficult to find things and you just about have to buy all the available books for your year to get what you want- for instance, all the air conditioning stuff is in electrical, even the compressor, evaporator and condenser.

I also have two of the Professional Restoration Series from Forel Publishing, Titled: Part and Body Illustrations, and Wiring and Vacuum Diagrams. They are pdf, are all exploded views, with some fuzzy copies, but are searchable.

If you prefer exploded views, there are more of them in Osborne and Forel than the shop manual, which is largely instructions. The Ford shop manual has a specification section for every group- like torque specs which you will definitely need. Last to consider is what is available- there is no Interior manual from Osborne for a 69, but it does exist for a 70. They are close but not always identical. Like I said more is better- get em all.
 

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I have the paper and like it. But I have used a magnifier too. I've caught myself grabbing my cheap jeweler's loupe in my toolbox to look at the small numbers. Or I ask one of my teenagers, they can just read it.........
 

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I have the PDF versions of the shop manual, part & body illustrations as well as a few other things on an old iPad in the shop. I found a used copy of the shop manual on eBay for $1, so now I have that too... I love old manuals that people scribbled in. The functionally of the PDFs is great though.
 

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Any preferred vendor for the pdf's?
 

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Anyone have the 1965 Shop Manual on an Open PDF??? I need one. I have other years to trade such as 1966, 1967 and 1969... I am also looking for 1968 and 1970 years also on Open PDF file (Not locked with some bogus code)... E-mail me at [email protected] if you're interested in trading... Thanks, Tony K.
 

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Paper works in direct sunlight.
That's why I print out only the 3 or 4 pages I need when I am working on something - sometimes I zoom in and just print part of a diagram
 
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