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Discussion Starter #1
I have purchased and assembled this:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/jcmeyer5/current/overflow.jpg

Right now, the tank is sealed, and when it is assembled, it will be sealed from the radiator to the tank. This means air cannot get out. What will this cause? I am thinking (out of hte box of course) that it will still overflow, it will still spill into the tank, and that it will become "pressurized" in the tank. This will keep more water in the radiator, and it will push water back in to the radiator rather than having the radiator suck it in.

Chat room groupies seemed to think that the pressure would not allow fluid in, and that it would instead spill out of the cap.... and that if fluid DID get in, it wouldnt be pushed out and wouldnt get sucked out due to the sealed environment.

I can easily drill a small hole in the top plug.... but I cant seal it back up if it doesnt work right. What do you guys think?
 

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I think it will need a vent hole. just my .02. I could not view the link to your pic. tp.
 

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I agree with coupster. It needs to have a vent to atmospheric pressure to work. If it doesn't have a vent, when your coolant expands due to heat, there's only 2 places for it to go ... past the radiator cap (and onto the top of the radiator) or past a gasket somewhere. If the system can't move the air out of the overflow, it cannot move coolant into it.
 

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I agree with the others that you'll need to vent it. I think Johnpro said it best.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cant air compress? I can blow into it and have it compress somewhat... Cant fluid pressure do the same?

Doesnt matter.... the hole is drilled.
 

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Jim, yes air can compress with enough force. It will take more than 13-16 PSI, though to compress it, which means the radiator cap becomes the week link in the system, and the coolant will blow past the cap before there's enough force to compress air into the tank.

Even if you could compress air into the tank, you'd run the risk of blowing your radiator apart at the seems. They can't take that much pressure, thus the reason for a 13-16 psi cap ... it releives the pressure to protect the radiator, and/or other gaskets in the cooling system.
 
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