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See original post here : http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/forums/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=forum&Number=747832&page=&view=&sb=5&o=&fpart=1&vc=1


Here are the things I have tried or checked since the original post in an attempt to cure my problem.

1. Checked and adjusted timing. It was off about 3 degrees so I adjusted it but car still overheated afterwards.

2. Purchased a combustion leak test kit from napa as suggested by camachinist. It came up negative for any exhaust gases in the coolant system so I guess I don't have a cracked head, block, failed head gasket allowing exhaust to enter coolant system and cause overheating.

3. Spent basically all day flushing, reverse flushing, (although I am not sure the proper procedure for reverse flushing, could use some help here)and flushing some more. How can I tell for sure if there is any blockage in the system? Best I can tell all is flowing freely through the system. The car still overheated afterwards during test drive.

4. Removed thermostat altogether by some chance the brand new thermostat I had installed was faulty. It still overheated but took longer to get hot.

Something I should mention is that it takes about 20 - 25 minutes of driving before the car begins to overheat. I can tell by watching the temp gauge when the coolant system is unable to keep up with the rising temp of the engine and am able to shut down before car gets too hot and does damage but this usually take 20 - 25 minutes. It's as if the system is operating but just can't quite keep up.

I have developed a couple of theories that I would like your opinion on.

1. When I replaced the freeze plugs in the side of the block last year the new plugs were a bit deeper than the ones that came out of the block. The guy at the parts store assured me that they were correct for my car and would work fine. Is it possible the plugs are intruding into the block too far and partially restricting flow?

2. Coolant passage somewhere in engine is stopped up or restricted by debris in some way. If so haw do I clear the blockage other than flushing the system?

3. Taking a closer look at my radiator it appears to be a retrofit from another car because it is not bolted into the proper holes in the radiator support. Actually it appears to be larger than what was stock for the car judging by the holes in the radator support. Perhaps this retrofitted radiator just isn't doing the job it should and needs replacing. However it was doing the job before the failure of the freeze plug.

Let me know if you can think of anything else.
 

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I would suggest your next step would be to get your radiator rodded. I think I paid around $75 last time. I bet your radiator is full of debris.

However, if you say the radiator doesn't look like it was meant for your car, it could be way to small for your car all together. If you can manage to take some pictures and post them, we'll be able to tell you if it looks like a Mustang radiator or one suitable for your car. Even your local radiator shop should be able to tell just by looking at it.
 

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Get a shroud for starters. My daughter's car was running really warm today (I believe it was over 100 degrees today in Sacramento). At lunch I went and bought a shroud and installed it tonight. It's not much cooler tonight, but after installing the shroud and flushing her radiator, the gauge hasn't moved even to the half way mark after idling in the driveway for 40 minutes.

Is your overheating at idle, driving, or both? If it's just at idle, try fattening up your air/fuel mixture just a bit. A lean mixture will make the engine run hot.
 

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I'm betting that you may have knocked some debris loose while you were flushing and it's worked it's way into the radiator core. The radiators on these old Ford products were marginal at best and any degree of blockage will affect their ability to keep up with the engine's heat production rate. You mentioned that it takes 20-25 minutes to heat up. That tends to indicate that the radiator is not working fully and is slowly getting overpowered by the engine. Get the proper radiator for your car with a three row core (not the crappy stock two row). Also run distilled water and Red Line Water Wetter.
 

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My wife had a 93 Camry that blew a head gasket. We brought the car to the mechanic who replaced the head gasket. He told us the valves were burnt and needed to be replaced. He sent the heads out to be machined (they had warped) and replaced the valves. He also replaced the thermostat. When we got the car back, it overheated in after 15 minutes of driving. Upon inspection, he told us he found a leak in the radiator. He replaced the radiator and the thermostat. It overheated again. He told us there was air in the system. He bled the air. It overheated again. He replaced the thermostat. It overheated again. He installed a new thermostat and radiator cap. It overheated again.By this point, we had enough. Car was brought to the dealer. Dealer discovered the engine had a "hot spot" . Upon closer examination, he noticed the head gasket was installed incorrectly and was blocking cooling passage.

Moral of the story - Check your head gasket! ::

Mordi
 
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