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I believe I have come to the end of what for me was an epic saga, albeit one with long periods of dormancy punctuated by occasional swearing.

Today, I managed to finish fabbing up some simple brackets to attach my SPAL fan to my new custom-made Griffin HD radiator. I used the plastic doohickeys that come with the SPAL bracket kit, but the steel strapping that's attached to them is pretty much worthless. Hence, the fabbed brackets.

But I digress. The real story here is this:
Griffin HD Radiator + SPAL 16" Puller Fan = Super Cool ::

I started up the coupe and let it reach operating temp (160 degrees with the current thermostat). It climbed a little higher, until the CSI programmable temperature gauge read 165, at which point it turned on the fan. After about 20 seconds of the fan doing it's thing, the temperature dropped precipitously to 158, and the fan kicked off. It then climbed back, the fan kicked on, and the temp dropped again. Once the whole system reached a kind of equilibrium, the temperature cycled between about 162 and 168, with the fan cycling on and off. I'm thinking that with the system now able to shed the excess heat pretty much effortlessly, I might bump the thermostat up to 180, and raise the set point for the fan as well. Or not. SWMBO and I went for an inaugural drive, and the temperature gauge (the analog one inside the car, that is) never got above 1/4. I have never seen the needle stay that low in the entire time I've owned the car. Whoo hoooo!

Below are a couple of the most recent pictures. I won't bore you with the entire series, but if you missed my previous posts you can see large versions of the pictures here.

http://www.darkbox.com/mustang/griffin_install/griffin_install-Thumbnails/6.jpg
Here's the installed radiator & SPAL fan. Note the CSI programmable temperature gauge mounted permanently inside the engine compartment. This has been indispensible in diagnosing my ongoing cooling problems as well as making it really easy to dial in the perfect electric fan set temperature.


http://www.darkbox.com/mustang/griffin_install/griffin_install-Thumbnails/7.jpg
Here's a close-up of the fabbed brackets.


http://www.darkbox.com/mustang/griffin_install/griffin_install-Thumbnails/8.jpg
Here you can see the stand-offs holding everything together. Both the fan brackets and the overflow tank are held on with these long 5/16-18 bolts and an assortment of nuts, coupling nuts, washers, and lock washers. I think it took a total of four trips to Orchard Supply to get all the parts I needed for the brackets.
 

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That looks terrific. BTW, where were you yesterday? Did I miss seeing you?
Stan
 

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Congratulations! I would recomend the 180 thermostat, since your system can shed the heat and keep it right at 180 (+ or- a couple of degrees) you can get the benefit of having your engine run at basically the same temperature all the time. This improves wear because different parts of the engine expand and contract in response to heat differently. If you can keep it (almost) constant your engine will respond better over time.

The Ford specs for these engines was a 196 or so thermostat, most of us think that is to high, a 180 seems a good comprimise.

Have fun!

John Harvey
 

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Current cars include 1969 Mach 1 and 1970 Cougar XR7 convertible
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Only 4 trips to OSH??? Congrats, I think that's a new record!!
 

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I would toss the t-stat get a 180 and have the fan start around 190. It won't turn on as much when you don't need it. Mines pretty loud so That took care of cooling and nosie.
 
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