Vintage Mustang Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having a problem painting my dash, and I wondered if any of you experts out there could shed some light.

I sanded most of the old paint, and smoothed out any imperfections then primed, that was fine. But the paint will NOT dry properly. It is Black Semi-gloss made for our interiors from one of the Mustang catalogs. WHats happening is it kinda greys over immediately and has no gloss at all. I painted my doors the same way and they look fine, however the dash just wont dry right.

I thought it might be the humidity, but i have tried it at 7am on a cooler day with the same results. So now I'm stuck. I even thought that maybe I didn't prep the metal well enough, but after primer and several attempts to spray the dash, the paint is just going over other paint, not metal, so it shouldn't have any problems adhering.

Any advise? Is it the humidity that causes it to dry real fast and Improperly? Did i NOT prep it right?? I have painted several interiors before, and never experienced this.

I appreciate any and all help.
Thanks
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,417 Posts
I had the same thing, in my case is was from dampness... :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,832 Posts
Did you use the same primer for the doors? You say it grays over so maybe its soaking into the primer or the solvents in the paint are lifting the primer. You could have also got a bad can of paint, is it laquer or enamel? Try painting a plain piece of metal and see if you get the same problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,637 Posts
I've used those types of interior paints before and have found they are very heavy in solvents/carriers. If you don't keep them well shaken and throughout your painting process, the first few areas you do will come out fine because there's allot of color pigment in the mix, but as you go along, the color and coverage fades away to the point where all you're spraying is the carrier/solvents.

When you re-tried again in the early am, were you using a fresh can of paint, or the one you were using the day before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,413 Posts
Hopefully you were painting over the original finish. Hoping you used a light coat of lacquer primer, also. The grayish that you are getting is called blushing. It is the result of painting in humid climate. The way to control this is to warm the surface with a hair dryer and apply with fairly light coats. Holding the hair dryer about 2 ft from surface will keep the blushing away and let the lacquer dry normally, which is fast. If your previously applied surface is not sandable, then you will need to remove the material and start over.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top