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All,

I have recently had my car painted and have some questions surrounding touch up of paint.

Of course I have had some small issues with fender install and window installation in regards to having chips that I would like to have repaired, all mostly along the edges even though I used tape to protect it. Upon taking this issues up with my painter (of whom is already paid), he tells me that "those may hard to match and look good" because I have a white primer underneath. It seems to be a real bugger to get him to do this.

I guess what I am asking is....Is it really difficult to have these edges or spots redone is he blowing smoke? What is it on a scale of 1 (easy) to 10 (difficult). It seems to me just reasonably speaking that this type of issue is always present out there and that it would be relitivly easy for a professional to repair. After that, I understand that I would be on my own. While it may seem that I have high expectation I just want to have it right to begin with and then it would my problem.

Which brings me to this...Is there any great way or method when repairing paint chips on your own for my future knowledge. Your knowledge is appreciated.
 

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IMO To do it right, the area should be sanded down to smooth out the chipped area, and then reshot and then the paint blended into the rest of the panel or the whole panel painted. With new paint jobs matching paint is less risky but over all it's not an easy fix.

Simply touching up the chips will never be the same.

In the future when handling newly painted panels, use tape on the edges which prevents chipping
 

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Of course I have had some small issues with fender install and window installation in regards to having chips that I would like to have repaired, all mostly along the edges even though I used tape to protect it.
In the future when handling newly painted panels, use tape on the edges which prevents chipping
He said he used tape on the edges as suggested. This is my concern when I get my 66 GT out of paint, is chipping even with tape.

I can see where it would be a nightmare to repair the chips.

Allen
 

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A lot depends on the color. You do not specify a color, but metallics will be more difficult to match. My '66 is black and I mixed a good touch-up color. I have paint filled chips, sanded and hand buffed them with great success.
 
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I agree with the painter, chips are hard to repair and match. Because he'd have to blend it and reclear the entire panel.

It takes a couple layers of tape to protect well but even then you need to be very careful when putting panels back.

He's probably reluctant to get back into it because the amount of money it would require to truly be worth his time really isn't worth it for a small issue. What I do when this happens is take the leftover basecoat (hopefully he gave it to you) and with a fine tipped sword brush (like what's used for painting models). Just dab a little bit of that basecoat into the chip. Go in every day and dab a little bit more in there and you can build up the mil thickness enough after awhile that it will mostly fill the chip in and won't be too noticeable.
 

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Paint perfection is a goal best left unachieved. If you can’t see it from the drivers seat just learn to deal with it. motocross riders get a freshly painted helmet and smack it on the ground a couple of times. Get that first one out of the way. It gets easier after that. Driver cars are gonna get chips
 

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I should add, don't worry about clear coat if you fill it with basecoat. Because then you'd have to have the clear coat, and then you'd have to mix activator in with it, it's all not necessary. That basecoat will work just fine as it is. The basecoat in those area may dull--after sitting years in the sun.
 

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Question #1 is "What is the finish type? Single state, base/clear... is it metallic, etc.?".

I repair chips using a match (the end opposite the business end). Daub paint into the chip letting each coat dry before adding the next. Keep applying until you are just ABOVE the level of the surrounding paint, let dry thoroughly, then wet-sand back to level finishing with a fine grit (2,000 or better) that expands out from the chip. Polish from there. For base/clear, stop your color BELOW the level of the surrounding area then clear up to and slightly ABOVE. Metallics are a PITA as the metallic will react to gravity and run toward the low spot. I've never had to fix a chip in a metallic finish that would be noticeable, but I think I'd do the final coats with my airbrush....
 

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I agree with finding a pro. We have a real expert in the area that can match anything.

I also agree modern fresh paint will be easier to match.

When I got my car painted the guy called and said I’m going to jail come get your car.

There were tons of little imperfections. I was getting nowhere with the guys girlfriend who was running the shop.

I called this well known touch up guy when I explained the situation he went through the whole car and touched up 25 different spots. Honestly he’s a master and killed it. Paint looked amazing and was definitely easier than waiting for the painter to get out of jail. 10 years later still perfect.

My advice find the local touch up expert. Might even be mobile. These guys are good!
 

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I agree with woodchuck. If the chips are sharp and can be "filled in", build them up and sand them down using a really stiff sanding block or even a small piece of lucite that i have used as a sanding block before. You don't want to sand the surrounding paint off.
 
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