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My son and I are restoring a 69 mustang and are interested in performing as much paint preparation as possible. The car was purchased from the widow of the original owner and is still the original factory paint.

The car is intended as a daily driver with metallic BC/CC finish, and although I don't expect show quality paint (out of our budget), I would like the paint to last 8 years...

Problems with the body consist only of oxidized paint and a few small door dings. There is no rust visible anywhere on the car.

The current plan is to strip all trim, accessories, glass and interior from the car. I am fairly comfortable with the articles I have read regarding pounding out the door dings, sanding the affected areas to bare metal, and applying body filler.

My two main questions are:

1)Given the goals above, should the entire car be stripped to bare metal, and if not, what should be done to the factory finish to assure a good paint job?

2) Is is possible/practical to prime the car ourselves without a compressor/airgun? I know enough not to use rattle cans and have read about the use of rollers for applying a true automotive primer.

All advise for getting the best possible paint job on a budget is appreciated.
 

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Without knowing what your budget is, this is a hard question to answer but her goes.

Since it appears as if you do not have the equipment to do the job yourself (which can be quite expensive itself) I would suggest doing the prep work yourself and having someone else do the paint work. By this I mean you and your son should take all the trim, bumpers door handles etc. off the car, fix the door dings and scuff the entire car. I would then check into places like maaco for the paint work. Some of their packages include the application of a primer/sealer and then the paint. There one paint job consists of an "integrated clear coat" which consists of adding base and clear together for the final coat of paint. While this is not a true BC/CC finish it's not bad.
I think that a number of VMF members have gone this route and most will tell you that the finished product comes down to the initial prep work.

Hope this helps and good luck.

Scott
 

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First off, what budget do you have in mind? Me personally would opt to strip the car for a longer lasting paint job, not too hard with a compressor and a da sander, without that leaves hand sanding (a forever job) or chemical, effective but messy. I dont know about rolling on primer, doesnt sound like a good idea to me. I think I'd do the bodywork and take it to a few places for some quotes. If you do take it to metal, be prepared to find surface imperfections that will need fixing. Getting the paint to last 8 years will probably require keeping it garaged, or at the very least covered for the most part when not in use.
 

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I have a '66 Coupe I purchased because it had few visible dings in the body. I decided to take all the paint off because I wanted to truly know the structural integrity of the car.

Here's what I found: (1) rust forming in body join seams, where the 40 yr old seam filler finally separated, (2) a couple of accident repair, done reasonably well but the tell-tail signs of bondo use were there, and (3) a small amount of rust-thru damage, hidden by paint.

I'm VERY glad I took the car down to bare metal. I've been at this for 2 years now, with long stretches of doing nothing on the car (but raising kids instead). I had a case of "while I'm at it" disease and changed the fresh air cowls, but that's a different story.

Lastly, rattle can primer doesn't do the job like spray gun primer. Rattle can primer leaves voids in the primer paint, allowing moisture to wick to the bare metal, starting the rust process.

I borrowed a friends air compressor and spray guns and have been snadblasting/stripping, then priming the clean areas with PPG DP90 epoxy primer as the first protective coat.
 

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BC/CC will stand up to the envioronment for the final layer of material. To prep, the existing surface will need to be prepped with 220 grit, sand blast any rust, fix dings/dents then lay down 2 coats of PPG epoxy primer. It is expensive but it will seal any of the remaining origional paint/body work that may be lingering. After preliminary body work, lay down PPG high build primer (2-3 heavy coats) then be prepared to block sand unitl you and your son have both tendonitis and bursitis of the shoulders. You will find high/low spots using a light guide coat. Fix with "new" polyester filler (doesn't shrink like old bondo) made by evercoat. Some fillers can go over top of primer, some need bare metal. I went with the over primer stuff, works great (as local paint shop). You may need to block sand, and re-coat with high build primer several times before the panels are straight. This is where time/patience and alot of elbow work pays off. Everyone wishes they would have block sanded more (including me). You will go through 220 then 320, then 500/or 600 grit before it is smooth enought. When this is done, another coat of epoxy goes on as a sealer coat with the addition of 1/4 mix of the reducer that will be used with the basecoat. This thins the mix for a smooth coat. Before the sealer coat goes on, you need to be happy with the surface. The sealer coat is not sanded (except dust nibs). Then 2-3 coats base, 2-3 coats clear. The investment in material, equipment, time.... it ends up being alot. I am afraid of totaling mine up. It may be more cost effective to do as previously suggested. Take off trim, do a whole car sanding with 220 grit using a sanding block. Fix imperfections as able, and send out for sealer and paint. I am glad I did my own paint, but I have had no "life" for the last 3 months :)
 
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