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I gave my paint gun another try today, and it's working great. Now that I understand the steps for setting the air and fluid controls, there's no problem. In fact, I got the gun settings right in less than a couple minutes and surprised myself.

I thinned the chassis black by 20 percent with tolulol, which is the recommended solvent on the can and it seems to flow fine. The gun never plugged up, it sprayed fine. I first painted the driveshaft, which I put on a set of jackstands. Unfortunately, I got a bad run with my first pass, but I know why it happened. Then, while trying to turn it over once, it fell off the stands and rolled across the plastic on the floor. Oh well, I knew I would have to sand the run anyway.

Then, I went to work painting the subframe connectors and traction bars. It sure isn't easy, but I managed to get them all painted with one coat. It sure does take some manuevering under the car to get the gun in the right position and there isn't much room. I've never painted lying on my stomach before, but that position seems to work best.

My question now is, some of the connectors have the nice gloss shine that I want, but others are dull looking. What am I doing wrong with the dull ones? Is it a spray distance problem?

Oh, the final problem today was when I tripped the circuit breaker in the garage. Guess I can't have my compressor, a fan, a radio, ceiling lights, and big light on all at the same time. The funny thing was that it didn't blow until I had just about finished. I had been painting for almost three hours before it happened.
 

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Yes, distance away from the gun can affect the shine quality. Too close, and you'll get nice shiny runs. Too far away, and you'll get a dull finish with lots of orange peel.
 

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Okay, thanks, I'll have to try and keep a consistent distance under there. It sure ain't easy. At least now I have beer. Somehow it seems appropriate to mention "beer" in my 15,000th post. :lol:
 

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Consistent distance and arm motion. Too slow, runs. Too fast dry and dull. It a balance between speed and distance.

Love your cars by the way. Good luck.
 

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I took a look at the subframe connectors today and the paint flowed out a bit so it looks more consistent. I do have some small runs in areas, so next weekend I'm going to sand them, then put on another coat while trying to keep the same consistent distance. There's also some marks from where the plastic I was using to mask the tranny tunnel came down and contacted one bar. Those will have to be sanded, too. It's not easy, but then there's the challenge. ;)

Here are a couple of pictures from today:


http://www.tucsonpony.com/frame1.jpg

http://www.tucsonpony.com/frame2.jpg
 

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WOW!! Those are some serious sub frame connectors! Your 'Stang will never flex. Looking good :)
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #7
They're TCP Kits 1 and 2, plus I have traction bars hooked into them. I figured with a built-up 390 in there, some chassis strengthening was needed. ;)
 

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They look great Laurie. Keep in mind that your quest for pefection will go un-noticed way down there....

I know, I know. You'll know that it isn't perect and it will bother you.... I'm the same way. Sometimes though, I step back and look at the amount of work I'm doing to make something that no-one will ever see look perfect, and I relax my standards a little...

They're painted black and they look great, don't beat yourself up trying to get them perfect. The only way they could be painted perfect would be if they were removed... everything else is "close" to perfect....

Dave
 

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Thanks guys, but I posted the "good" pictures. There are a couple of sections that really don't look so hot. Those are the ones with the runs and the masking plastic damage. But, I'll fix them. Although many people won't see under there, the car will be shown in the modified, undercarriage judged class at MCA shows. So, I have to be a little more picky than normal. Besides it keeps me out of trouble. :lol:
 

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Laurie_S said:
I figured with a built-up 390 in there, some chassis strengthening was needed. ;)
That reminds me, how is the motor build/rebuild going?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The block is done, and they're going to start building it up in about two weeks. I can't wait to see and hear it! I doubt if it will go in the car until January or so, because I have to finish the underside, then redo the engine bay.
 

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Laurie, if you try to get complete coverage on the first coat, you are almost certain to get runs. When painting car bodies I don't get complete coverage until at least the second coat, and sometimes not until the 3rd coat. The first coat should leave a result that looks like a mist coat. You call this a tack coat and then wait only half the full drying time to apply the second coat. This means the first coat is wet enough that the second coat flows into it, but not so wet that the two combined into one thick coat creates runs and sags. Wait the full between coat drying time before applying the third coat.

Painting is more technique that responding to visual cues. I can and have painted successfully areas on the car that I could not see, relying completely on technique.

As for painting rocker panels or parts/areas low to the ground, you can loosen your air cap and rotate it 180 degrees. This will change the spray pattern from verticle to horizonal, relative to the paint cup. It makes it easier to paint as you don't have to rotate the gun so much and have both clearance problems with the paint cup and problems of no paint flow with a gravity feed paint cup.

As for the driveshaft - one trick I learned from a pro shop is when something like this happens, you can take a rag wetted with the reducer for the paint, and wipe all the paint off the area, just like it was lacquer thinner. However, since the reducer is chemically compatible with the paint, you can almost immediately paint over the area without any fisheye. Just make sure that there is no dirt or dust from the rag. I use old white dress shirts or sheets, as the weave of the fabric is tight, leaving no lint.

When painting the 70, I accidently backed my hind end into a freshly painted part setting off the car, leaving a nice blue jean texture imprint. Was able to use the reducer trick to wipe it out and repaint. No need to wait a day for the paint to dry, then sand it, clean it, and repaint.
 

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Thanks, I bet I'll be using that reducer trick. I'm going to lightly sand the subframes with the runs and then reshoot everything. I have a feel for the gun now, but I sure wish the car were 6 inches more off the ground.

I think the floorpans actually will be easier because I'll be able to turn the gun upside down with the ziplock baggie inside. I can't do that with the detail gun, and I can't fit the regular gun in around the subframes.
 

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Obviously can't comment on the technical aspects, but I wanted to say: Looks good, Laurie!
 
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