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Discussion Starter #1
Background:
I have been working on a 66 coupe for the past few months and about ready to paint. I have a decent compressor, gun, filter, filter/oiler system, and a high quality etching primer. I have also disassembled anything that could come off the body. Doors, hood, etc... I want to do a clear coat candy apple red.

Questions:
1. If I have used my air hoses for air tools, oiled by an filter/automatic oiler combo, can I just turn off the oiler and not contaminate my paint? Or should I buy a separate moisture filter for the paint job? Can I still use the hoses that I used for my air tools, or should I get a new hose for the paint job.

2. It looks like it would be easier to prime the parts separately from the main body - true? If so should I also paint the parts separately? or put the car back together after the primer?

Thanks for your assistance.
 

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Get a new air hose and I would have another filter installed with shutting off the oiler. There are filters you can attach to your spray gun. There is nothing worse than having something you could prevented ruin your paint job. The time it could take fix the problem could be great as well.

Since you have a solid color you shouldn't have a problem painting the car in pieces. I painted my 65 fastback in pieces. The doors where the only thing left on the car when the shell was painted. It takes to much time to realine the doors and you stand a chance of damaging the paint when trying to install the doors after you have painted. Some may feel that way about the other panels. I blocked sanded the car with the fenders and doors on the car. Every thing else was sanded off the car.
 

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I agree with RTM. You may also want to put this question to the wise folks at Autobodystore.com. I'm learning a lot from them about body prep and painting. Good luck.
 

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Go to the wrecking yard. Buy a junk hood. Go to the paint store buy a sample of the odd lot paint that is always there.

Go home and practice. You will be glad you did. The screw-up won't be so bad.
 
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Thanks guys for your assistance. You all validated that I am on the right track. I especially like the idea of practicing on junk sheet metal. I am doing a complete restoration and I really want to do everything myself. The paint was giving me the eebie jeebies, especially since the paint is about $1,100. As soon as the temp drops below 100 here in Fresno, I'll shoot the primer. Thanks again.
 
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