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First, Happy Holidays to all of you!
I am in the process of restoring a 66 Fastback .. I have no faith in the painters in my area and having challenged myself with bodywork/ metal repairs and being quite happy thus far with what I've done, I've decided to take my challenge to painting the car myself.
Can anyone offer advice as to doing this in my garage.
Constructing a booth... dust prevention/removal etc.
I have received really good advice on various topics in the past and look forward to responses.
Thanks!
 

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I'm looking forward to some advice in this area also. In about 9 months I'll be in the same position.
 

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What is the layout of your Garage? Any windows, ceiling fans, type of floor? What climate do you live in? (Humidity). This can be simple or complicated. Do you have dry compressed air? (desicant or refrigerated dryer after the compressor) You need two things for a good paint job. The right equipment, and talent relative to being able to do the paint job. Is it possible to rent time in a booth in your area?
 

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Best information I ever got was from www.paintucation.com

Log into the Forums and you will find tons of answers. Also the videos are excellent and worth the money.

A word of caution, Modern automotive paint can be a nasty thing. Please be careful and protect yourself with a fresh air respirator. Most automotive paints of today contain isocyanates. A regular charcoal canister respirator will not cut it.


Safety first and do your research, and then have fun painting your own car. It is an amazing feeling when you end up with a paint job that rivals what most shops turn out. You get out what you put into it.


Cheers,

Rufus
 

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I was the same way. Did everything else on the car, why not paint it? I constructed a paint booth in my pole barn (cement floor) with sheet plasctic and the results were really good. A couple of tips:

1)I used PPG base coat/clear coat. This approach will let you fix runs and imperfections easily. I had a run or two, and was able to wet sand them out out of the clear coat and then re-shoot. Used a tip from the paint shop: if you are shooting metallic, your last base coat should be a very thin mix. Shoot a light mist of it, and it will make the metallic stand out just like its supposed to. Practice a lot. Minimize your orangepeel, or you will be sanding a great deal.

2) I used a Finishline III HVLP gun. Worked great. Be sure to use a pressure gauge on the gun to know the exact pressure that you are getting at the gun. I used two cheap inline filters, one at the compressor, one at the gun. If its humid, you can fill a tub of ice water, put a few coils of air line in it at a low point in the line, and trap some water that way as well.

3) I had fans blowing air into the barn through furnace filters, and sucking air out at the other end, also through filters. Consider using vapor safe fans: explosion is a possiblity :( I wet the floor down prior to painting to get any leftover dust. Once I swept and wet down the floor with a sprayer, I didn't do anything to the floor again to stir it up.

4) Be sure to use a Tyvek bunny suit and respirator. The chemicals in today's paint are pretty exotic, like isocyanates. People die from this stuff. Don't take chances. Follow the directions.

I sanded and buffed a lot, but its pretty good, and I saved money and gained satisfaction. You can do it!!!
 

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I used ppg bc/cc. I've painted 4 cars now with pretty good results. With the mustang I painted the red, then a couple coats of clear. Wet sanded it, then masked of the C stripes and painted them, shot a little clear over that area. Wet sanded out the ridges of the stripe, then shot 3 more coats of clear over the whole car. That really layed the stripes in nice, you can't feel them at all and gave me a lot of clear to wet sand and buff.
 

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It can be done and yield nice results. Set-up and equipment is everything. I suggest renting a spray booth if you can. sometimes you can go to a paint place and rent their booth on the weekend, if they are into classic cars and take an interest in your project.

If painting at home and neighbors are an issue, as well as paint fumes getting into your home (e.g., attached garage), consider the new water based auto paints. Spees Hecker makes a great product. Water based paints are the norm in Europe and the Big 3 U.S. makers are now introducing them into production line cars. It takes the polution factor way down.

I've painted PPG BC/CC and also Dupont single stage. I prefer the single stage paint because of having sanded through clear coat reparing runs. This requires repainting the area. With single stage, you don't have that issue. Sand it down and buff.

PPG has a product line called Omni (?). It is the next step down from the Deltron and Concept lines, but will soon be their standard line of paint. I used Omni single stage and cut my cost by 2/3rds the last time I bought paint. Haven't painted with it yet, but will soon.

If you search my posts over the last 18 months I"ve posted extensively on painting at home. Some of these posts took me over an hour to write. Hence, I will not repeat again here. You might find them informative.

good luck.
 

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Artic cat, I just used a plain old Craftsman compressor, but its pretty good sized. I didn't paint any stripes. This was all Ivy Green metallic.

BTW, someone mentioned the less expensive Omni line from PPG. That's exactly what I used. The paint shop said there is one key difference between it and the more expensive line of PPG paint: With Omni, they cannot easily match existing shades of paint already on a vehicle. In fact, they won't even try. But, if you are going to paint an entire car with the same batch of paint being mixed that day, they highly recommend it. It is far less expensive than the top of the line, and basically the same stuff. They warned me that I might need an additional coat of base coat, as it didn't have quite as many solids. And, they were right. But, it came out looking fantastic. I couldn't be happier.
 
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