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I just found out today that I get to help paint a friend's car next weekend. He has a 1965 convertible that he won in a raffle several years ago. Because of the rules problem in trailering a driven car to MCA shows, he went mild modified with it several years ago. The car is in great shape, except that the paint job needed redoing. So, this weekend, I finally get to help paint a whole car. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif We'll be taking the 'vert to the Grand National in Charlotte in our club's convoy.
 

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Watch out for flying bugs, smoke from the fires, and wear a mask (so he won't know who painted the car!!!).

Good luck...
 

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Definitely! However, he knows where I live and my new truck is recognizable so I can't hide. /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif
 

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Laurie,
Please be sure to have proper resperatory gear. A particle mask ain't going to do it. So many of the new paints/primers are extremely hazardous (don't belive me? read the side of the can - the list of dangers include halucinations and much more). Wear the equipment even when mixing and the vapors will hang in the room for a while after the job is done. Don't want to see any mustanger take unnecessary risks. Remember, two thin coats is better than one thick and you can't have too much light!
Dave
 

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Oh definitely! We're not doing basecoat/clearcoat so at least we don't have that worry. We have the full safety equipment for the other types of paint and my friend has painted many, many cars so he keeps an eye on me. I don't know how much actual painting I'll be doing, but I know they're going to hand me the spray gun at some point in the process. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 

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Just keep a consistant distance from the surface (follow the curves), watch the paint buildup closely; just at the point of glossing (just enough - not too shiny (runs) and not too dull (look like overspray, no gloss will ever show) is what you want. Long strokes and work the trigger at the end of each sweep. Got an old fender around to play with? Have fun, feels great to paint a nice finish on a car!
Dave
 
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