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I feel like such a jerk. I am painting a co-workers 66 coupe. This is the one that her brother started to "restore" for her and asked me to paint, upon his promise to have all the prep work done. Well, he is departed from the scene, leaving the car in pieces in the side lot. No prep at all. I have done the body work on it, and am painting the stripped shell and parts off the car, using a big tent of plastic over the car for a paint booth. This is located about 20 feet from the banks of the Sacramento River, along the levee and by the farms. Consequently, you have to get all done for the day and out of there before 8 p.m. because that is when the mosquitos swarm in like swallows to Capistrano. They are extremely attracted to the solvents in paint, as well as sweat anywhere on your body. They can also bite through blue jeans and apprently leather boots, judging by the 13 bites on my ankles.

anyway, tonights doofus was in cleaning the paint gun between cups of primer surfacer. I remembered that I had to do this because otherwise the paint hardens in the gun. Can't just flush it out with a new cup of paint. Well I reach for the handy new can of lacquer thinner I bought a couple of days ago. Yup, that red and blue can over there. The gallon one. I pour a big slug into the paint gun. Hmmmm, what's this? smells like coleman lantern fluid? That's strange. Hey, wait a minute, how come the paint in the cup is hardening, kind of clumping together into little miniture gumbies? Turns out that can of lacquer thinner was a can of de-waxer degreaser left over from about a month ago! The can was identical in every aspect - brand name, color, logo, even the weight of the can and amount of fluid in it. The only difference was in the part number and those few critical words - lacquer thinner - which were missing. This product totally gummed up the hvlp gun, paint cup. By the time the gun was clean the mosquitos were out and I could not paint any more. The window of opportunity for painting is kind of slim because we are having 105-106 degree days and it is even hotter than that under the platic tent! Doesn't cool down until about 6:30 or 7 p.m. I blew the opportunity to prime at least another door and fender. I am so silly.
 

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Hey Ken. All of us have stories like that! Why can't manufacturers of products use a different label? It can't be that expensive, can it? Sorry to hear about it just the same. On another note, are you going to join us at next year's BAMA show? Enjoyed meeting all of the SAMC people yesterday.
Stan
 

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I would really like to be at the show. What are the details? My 70 has a broken clutch linkage cable and is sitting in the dirt on the side of the road. I bought the ron morris clutch cable set up to replace the D&B setup, which broke twice. Ron Morris advertises his kit as a kit requiring no drilling. WEll, that's true. Instead, you have to pull the clutch pedal out of the car, cut off a piece of metal and grind the stub down. That is not advertised and only shows up when you read the intallation instructions. So, my car sits on the side of the road waiting for me to pull the clutch pedal out and grind away. I hope to get it back on the road before the bama show. Thanks for the communique. Nice to receive the invite.
 

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YOu are absolutely right. Seriously, Dupont says if the paint is cured in an oven, the temp should be 140. With 108 degrees of ambient air, I bet the metal under the plastic is approaching 130 or so. I know the body filler hardend up in about 90 seconds!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ouch, that one hurt. If I paid to get this done professionally, it would cost in excess of $10,000! Look at the paint job on my 70 post here. I painted that in my garage. Give me enough time and I will turn out a job that is comparable to 90 percent of the show cars out there. Of course I might have 300 hours into or more. It took me about 8 months to prep and paint the 70. I have yet to find a professional do anything on my stang that I did not have to redo or, when I did something comparable, did a better job. I have an aversion to paying someone $65 dollars an hour to do body work that I have to redo for fit and finish, when as an attorney, I don't make that money in my take home pay. So, like I say, Ouch. That comment hurt! (smile). Thanks for your input.
 

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Ken, what in the world are you doing painting someone else's car while you have 2 Mustangs down for the count and driving a rental car. I know, I know, I end up doing the same kinds of things.

Will you be at the meeting Thursday? We haven't seen your smiling face for a while. Are you going to bring a car to the show on the 24th? Even SacBill might possibly make the show, but it's getting pretty tight for him.
 

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Hey John, I sent you a private message re the car show. I want to volunteer to help out. Is the meeting this Thursday? I definately want to make it. I am driving the 65 now, but with a prayer on my lips every time i step on the brakes. Now aalmost all of my electrical except the ignition is out. NO turns, no brakes, but I do have headlights. On the other hand, I am getting close to 20 mpg, about triple what the 70 was getting. That's nice.
 

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ok. How about this, on my 65, I sanded the 14 inch steel wheels, painted them with extend rust neutralizer, let that dry overnight then painted them with epoxy primer, followed by two coats of krylon semi flat black. With the new wheel studs and lug nuts bright and shiny they look great. In fact, they are so nice I kept the wheel covers off! IT's been about a month and they still look freshly painted. Also, the braided steel flex lines are real sharp, threaded right up to the rigid lines and the new wheel cylinders. I hit the center section of the rear end with red oxide primer, except where the factory chalk marks were still present! sanded and painted the rear axle tubes and rear cover in the semi flat black - all while installed in the car. Looks great! The new stainless steel brake lines contrast nicely. No doofus on the job, just getting the suppliers to sell me the correct parts is the only problem. Hey, the engine on this 65 is also running like a champ. Lot's of torque on the 6 cylinder. Just wait till I paint it! I am looking at a PPG Harliquen line paint which is a blue/purple chameleon paint. It runs about $2,500 a gallon and they sell it in units as small as pints, at about $475 a pint. Haha, that would be too much for a daily driver. Still looking for the right color. I am thinking gaurdsman blue, which is the factory paint code, plus some blue pearl added to the base coat. Good to hear from you again. I've got to get to the club meetings again!
 

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Back in the days when we had a peanut farmer in the oval office I had my Mustang with me in south Florida. And when the sun went down I best be putting my tools away and heading inside after working on my Mustang in the parking lot. But your post on painting under the plastic is intriguing. Painting I think that I could do, however I suck at bodywork. /forums/images/icons/shocked.gif fd
USAF 1977-81
 

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Discussion Starter #14
And if the mustang was not driveable, you could saddle up one of the larger mosquitos and fly it home? ah yes. All the insects are larger on those tropical climes.

As for painting, it really is not painting. 90 percent of the job is preparation and 80 percent of that is sanding. The painting is actually the fun/easy part. Fortunately, I used to work for a house painter back in the college days. He had me sanding for the first couple of months, before he let me use a brush and roller. So, I learned a lot about technique for prep. I also used to restore antiques/refinish furniture part time in Washington, D.C. That was a good experience to learn prep, sanding, flow-out techniques for laquer and varnish. When it comes to body putty, I can be pretty artistic with skim coats. I've discovered metal-to-metal and all-metal body putty which is an epoxy with aluminum powder. The stuff is great! It does not shrink, does not crack, and if the metal is hit and bent, this stuff bends with the metal and can be straightened. I use this stuff for dents, after first beating the metal as close as I can back into shape with hammers and dolleys. Then, I skim coat with a polyester filler over the top of the all metal. Sanding, and sanding some more, get this super smooth. You prime it, then prime it with two or three coats of primer surfacer till you have about a 3 ml depth. Then, you spray bomb it with a spray can of contrast color (called guide coat) then sand that off. The contrast color shows the highs and lows as you sand, so you know where to beat the surface down or fill it up.

All sanding is done with a long flat board or air flat sander. Rarely rarely hand sand. Your hand follows curves and dips so you do not sand out body panel warps/waves, etc. With a board you are making a flat surface. This is called block sanding. You block sand a job twice and then shoot color and yuou have a pretty good surface. Follow that up with sanding the finished product with 2000-3000 grit and then polish with 2 or 3 grades of polish, then buff, and you have a glass smooth finish! Takes forever, but comes out show-car quality. So, applying color is not "painting" a car. Applying a colored smooth textured surface is what you are doing. just a little soliloquy in the late night. I'm too tired for this and should catch some zees. Thanks for your comments.
 
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70sportsroof,
That's nothing,man. years back when I was in the paint and body business, we bought our lacquer thinner in the 5 gallon cans. This was a pain in the ass to get a small ammount out to clean off our spreaders (bondo) so we would keep a Mountain Dew bottle filled with thinner on the bench to put a little on the rag when needed. Well, I made the mistake of drinking a Mountain Dew at work one day and setting the bottle of thinner next to my drink. Not thinking, I grabbed the bottle of thinner and took a big old gulp of that PPG lacquer thinner. None made it past the tongue ,thank God!, but I spewed lacquer thinner all over the shop wall and work bench. I never kept thinner in a Dew bottle again! From then on, it went in a Coke bottle, Since you can see that coke is not clear and the green tinted Dew bottle hid the thinner.
BTW, This does not qualify me for the doofis awared since the statute of limitations has run out on this event. It was almost 15 years ago this happened.
 
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Kind of reminds me of the time i thouge i was using tooth paste and it turned out to be bengay . Bad stuff
 
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