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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there such a thing as a perfect paint job? Maybe but at what cost? I just had my car painted and of course as I go through, being the Obssesive personality that I am, all I see are the little imperfections and flaws. They are still wetsanding and buffing, but I guess when I think about it, every paint job has some minute flas somewhere, right? Paint costs a lot, and since this is my first classic or any car that I would want a nice paint job on, maybe I am overly concerned. I notice even a little fluxuation in a certain light on the paint, but that otherwise looks normal if you don't tilt your head to the side and shine a light right on it....so I guess I am asking, is that a bit much? What did others pay if you don't mind me asking for your paint and what quality was it?

Dave, if you are reading this....you already know the answer to the "is it bit much"....since you have obviously seen my emails and how crazy I go over the smallest details....

In the end, I do want to show the car when it looks nice, but I guess, I more want to drive and enjoy it.....because after all, that is what these things are for right..to be driven..
 

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Wet sanding and buffing will help to remove some imperfections as well as make others less noticeable. Also remember that under flourescent shop lights the car will show more imperfections then outside.
 

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AS a painter for over 25 years, let me say that automotive refinishing is NOT a perfected science. No matter how nice you think the paint on ANY car is, the painter who painted it KNOWS where there are flaws. The key is to make as few mistakes as possible and try and hide or minimize the ones that occur. The more time you spend on prep and final detail, and the more experience you have TRYING to get it perfect, the better it will come out. As for cost of a "near" perfect paintjob, there is a guy here in town that does paintwork for some of the best rods in the country. His starting price is about $15,000 and some cost over $25,000. But he also has state of the art equipment that costs $250,000.
 

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Just like Dusty, I have been painting classic cars for over 25 years and I can tell you first hand I have never created a "perfect" paint job. If my customers are happy with the work and think it's perfect, then I've achieved my goal. However, I can see every little flaw and mistake I created even if the rest of the world can't. This has always been my motivation to "do better next time". I made a pretty good living at it over the years and like to think I knocked out some pretty good paint jobs. But perfect, never. My .02
 

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Current cars include 1969 Mach 1 and 1970 Cougar XR7 convertible
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I recall reading an article a while back about a guy in LA named Junior. His paint jobs can run into 6 figures and can take a couple of years.

Are you using a restoration shop or an insurance shop? What are you paying for yours?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well, it is a body shop that does do some insurance shop. I am close to 5 figures for a lot of various work including paint and bodywork.
 
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I guess I should ask you, are you happy with it? If not, are you willing to shell out more to get it to your standards? Or are your funds depleted for this stage? If you are driving the car you do understand that chips, small scratches etc are very hard to avoid. So do you really want it perfect? You do realize that 96.342 of people will never notice the "flaws" that you do right?
 

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+ on that! Approaching 5 figures including bodywork would be $9,000...right?
Not bad including good paint job!
 

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No perfect paint. In my experience it's almost like rolling the dice. First you have to find someone that is willing to start and finish in a timely manner, then also be willing to fix any flaws tha pop up without a fuss.
 

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The perfect paint job is the next one the painter is going to do, it is not the last one he completed. Now, think about that..... Yes, the painter will know every flaw, the owner will know only the ones he can spot during clean up and waxing. Then there is the fellow at the car show who spots one nobody saw or the better half being upset at the cost and pointing out each one. lol There are so many ways to find imperfections in the perfect paint job that you can drive yourself crazy. Attend a high end car show and really study the paint. Never seen one yet that I cannot find at least one "spot" that could be better. Get the best you can afford and and enjoy the car.
 

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+1 on that, get the best you can, and enjoy it.....My car has a second rate pait job for sure, but it still looks pretty good. Paint, to me, is the last item on the agenda....
 

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Looking at a paint job with a 'magnifying glass' is the reason I was given by most shops for not wanting to touch a classic. I found a place that reluctantly took on the job after being assured that I was looking for a nice looking paint job, not a flawless museum piece. For less than $5k, including blasting to bare metal, epoxy prime, body and two stage PPG paint, I'm happy. Yes, I can find a few flaws if looking close enough, same as with any new car I have ever bought. :D

 

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Get it as best as you can and enjoy it. I get very bad perfectistic tendecies sometimes, to the point where I have a very hard time letting go and simply enjoying what has actually been done.

I find its best to learn and move on, after each time I've painted a car I've learned something in which I could make it a lot better next time, but its important to enjoy what has been done, even if it is no longer the best you can do, it was the best you could do at the time.

Being too fickle can easly cause you not to enjoy it at all. Determine what really bothers you and if its worth the effort to fix, if not, just let it go and remember it next time around.
 

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Perfect paint is unobtainable! I've painted many cars and all of my own, no matter how much prep time and care during painting...wet sanding and buffing, something ALWAYS happens.

Will I try to get it perfect, hell yeah... Will it ever be perfect.....nope.

When I painted the 66, SWMBO had to remind me again that perfect wasn't gonna happen. I can point out every flaw, I just had to accept it and move on enjoying the car.
Once I did that it's been mucho fun :thumbup:
 

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I believe in Karma.
If you were ever to attain a perfect paint job,
it would throw the cosmic forces into turmoil and
an uninsured driver would smash into you to bring balance and harmony back to the cosmos. :p
 

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I have a painter/bodyman staying with me to finish the Mustang and some work on my ZR-1. I met him about 22-23 years ago when he painted my '65 Corvette (one of the best jobs I've ever seen). He's been doing cars for over 50 years...some of which were with George Barris and other well-known customizers...and has had several magazine cars over the years. A perfect paint job? His answer to that has always been.....drum roll..... "No".
 

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cecil671 said:
I believe in Karma.
If you were ever to attain a perfect paint job,
it would throw the cosmic forces into turmoil and
an uninsured driver would smash into you to bring balance and harmony back to the cosmos. :p

Ain't that the truth.
 
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