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I think the ones on this stang is Torque Thrust D's, but the Vintage 45's looks similar to them, just add about 20 years of being stored outside un-covered and un-protected from the weather, and you can picture what these look like. :p

http://www.mustangandfords.com/mustangfords/featuredvehicles/127_0301_gt_1_chr_z.jpg

Don't know if they are authentic or not, but got them for a pretty good price so I'm not complaining. They are actually in pretty good shape considering. No curb rash, dings or nicks. Any proper way of bringing them back to life without damaging them?

I was thinking of beadblasting the centers to remove all of the flaking paint, then repainting and sealing them. Any problems with this idea? Since the outer ring is suppose to be natural & polished, what's the best way to go about this without damaging or discoloring them?

Had thought about having a place that restores wheels here in town do it, but I would rather give it a shot myself before giving in.

Any recomendations of good products and procedures to clean these up and make them look nice would be greatly appreciated ? They are pretty weathered.

Oh, and they are missing the center caps, where can I find just the caps?
 

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Just yesterday I was at my body shop and he had just had 4 Cherokee wheels powdercoated... These particular wheels also had a rim edge that was to be kept natural.

They looked awesome. the prep that was done: Thermally stripped of paints, media blasted for smooth surface, then powdercoated...

The powdercoater and the blaster paid very good attention to not blasting/coating the rim edge and the result was really perfect and very longlasting.

Maybe this helps... Although I don't know if you can powdercoat yourself... There are kits for it, but still..
 

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OMG that 66FB is sooooo georgous!!!!! :( ::
if u ask...how do u know its a 66 for sure and not a 65?
my reply...look directly at the grill and see how it doesnt look honey-combed like a 65 does...and notice how the bars are polished and totally horizontal...mmmm looks verrry pristine....can i sit in it please doug? ::

oh yea...1 more thing doug...check to see if there's any wasps 1st ;) lol just pokin' ur sides buddy.
 

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One of the mags recently suggested using Baking powder in some water to polish chrome and remove rust. I haven't tried it yet but thought I would let you know.
 

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Vintage Wheel Works in Whittier CA has links to several suppliers of caps, though I think the caps they ship with their Vintage 45s are the best looking (albeit plastic). I had them powdercoat the spokes and inner rim of mine and they turned out great, http://a8.cpimg.com/image/BC/C4/12084668-66c0-02000151-.jpg
I'm not sure how well paint would hold up. If the outer rims are not scratched you should be able to buy a wheel buffing kit from Eastwood or Griot's Garage to clean and shine them. Good luck!
 

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I bought a rough set of TTDs a couple of years back to restore and resell. The spokes had been repainted a few times - last time a nice neon green :eek:

I carefully stripped the paint off the spokes, and repainted them a correct dark gray - masking the rim area.

As for the rim, I used fine steel wool to remove the aluminum oxidation. The best tip I got (which I was too chicken to try) was from Charlie Jones/"roadracer".....He recommended mounting the rims on the rear of my car, putting the rear on jackstands, starting the car and putting it in gear so the wheels would spin under power - and then carefully using the rotation of the wheels to polish them ! I could see me losing a finger, so I chickened out - but IIRC he used to run a set on his sweet '66 GT-350 and swore it works.....

Anyway, my set turned out nicely with a lot of elbow grease and a little fresh paint. I made a nice turn on those... :: Dickson
 

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I had some slotted aluminums that were freebies but were very weathered. It was a brushed aluminum surface. I had to use a medium coarse steel wool (2 or 3) and then went to 00 and then 000. then some mothers aluminum mag polish using a buffer wheel on a drill finished them off. It's all a matter of how shiny do you want them to be...if so... keep on rubbin with that steel wool. As for the centers, I would use a quality liquid stripper and then after cleaning with lacquer thinner I would mask and paint. good luck tp.
 
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