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Pinon Bearing Nut Torque

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Im planning on fixing my leaky 8” rear axle and I’m going to be replacing my pinion seal with a new one and also a new pinion nut. I’ve heard the torque specs with your same crush sleeve is 125ft pounds but I’ve also heard 175ft pounds so im very lost as to what i should set it to.
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It takes a lot of force to crush that sleeve. You need a tool to hold the pinion yoke while tightening the nut.
tighten the nut then ck the rotational torque with the inch pound wrench. Repete till you get it correct.
this is done without the ring gear installed.
read the ford shop manual as suggested above.

ken
 

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If you have it apart and there is any kind of a groove, use a Speedi-sleeve. Here's a picture of my groove.
View attachment 869450
That groove does not required a sleeve. I put a seal on my Mountaineer, grooved deeper than that, and ran it another 100,000 without a drop.
 

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It seems like they’ve never been changed, where can i order some. But they fell on the dirty floor sadly, what grease can i use to stick back on once i clean them
OEM had cork seal, not blue rubber, and of course OEM had no zero fitting. Chassis grease does the job nicely, after a good cleaning.
 

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Mine did not look that bad and it leaked speedi sleeve and another seal fixed it.
Now if only i could get the rear main to stop leaking. 2 seals and still leaking.


ken
Is there any side to side play in the bushing by the slip yoke?
 

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Like others, I've ugga-dugga'd pinion nuts back in place and gotten away with it. That said, it's not the way to do the job. If you want to do it right, the attachment below is the seal replacement procedure from the 71 Ford shop manual. It's the same across all years for 8" and 9" rears. The torque spec for the pinion nut is 175 ft/lbs. A simple parts store $20 1/4" drive in/lb beam torque wrench is all that's needed to set the preload.

To be honest, you seem very new at this. Stop and get yourself a 67 shop manual. It's $17 well spent.

 

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That groove does not required a sleeve. I put a seal on my Mountaineer, grooved deeper than that, and ran it another 100,000 without a drop.
22, A couple of years ago I replaced the seal on my 68 with 120,000 miles and it leaked. Pulled it apart and put a sleeve in.
On my 67 I did not want to take the risk of putting it back together and it leaking. It was cheap insurance. Pinion had 300K+ miles on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Speedi-sleeves and pinion crush sleeves are two completely different things.
You cannot buy just the needle bearing cups for the u-joint. You replace the entire u-joint assembly.
You don't need to cut the u-bolts to remove the driveshaft and u-joint assembly from the pinion yoke. This must be your first time to do this job.
First time ever working on a car period😂. But thank you i will be replacing my u-joint soon
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Just did this job on the 8” on my 69…..Looks like you already got the universal apart, but I found that rotating the driveshaft a bit not only improved access to the nuts, but also brought those u-bolts to a point where they’d just barely slip out.

If you’re just replacing the pinion seal and nut you won’t see the crush sleeve - that’s buried inside the diff - folks here are talking about a sleeve made of a very thin metal that slips over the shaft to make up for a worn groove deep enough to make your leak come back….will that groove catch the tip of a sharp pick? If not, you shouldn’t need the sleeve.

Consider the procedure described in the FSM. It begins with removing the rear wheels and drums and using an inch/pound torque wrench on the pinion nut to determine the existing preload. This value is important and specified in the FSM. The FSM goes on to tell you how much more you should tighten it after installing the new seal and pinion nut.

There’s a difference between the amount of torque applied to the pinion nut to get it tighter during installation and the measurement in inch/pounds of the force required to keep the pinion nut rotating once you get it to move in the “preload testing stage.”

Many folks are comfortable and familiar enough with the job to use other methods - counting the number of threads exposed on the end of the shaft, use of impacts, etc. Remember that the goal is to get the new nut on there at the same tightness it was before plus a smidge more….That “smidge more” is detailed in the FSM but is also found in decades of guys knowing just how much tighter to hit it - but if you over-tighten it, the preload is wrecked.

I’m an FSM guy, but in fairness, the pinion nuts on most of these 55 year old cars have likely been replaced “outside” the FSM for decades. I’d start with the FSM and then, if you’re so inclined, slim down the procedure based on experience and results.
Wow thank you for taking the time to type that all out, that was really helpful. I don’t see any grooves so i think it’s alright but im going to clean up the diff after the job and see if it leaks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Like others, I've ugga-dugga'd pinion nuts back in place and gotten away with it. That said, it's not the way to do the job. If you want to do it right, the attachment below is the seal replacement procedure from the 71 Ford shop manual. It's the same across all years for 8" and 9" rears. The torque spec for the pinion nut is 175 ft/lbs. A simple parts store $20 1/4" drive in/lb beam torque wrench is all that's needed to set the preload.

To be honest, you seem very new at this. Stop and get yourself a 67 shop manual. It's $17 well spent.

Just ordered it thank you 🙏🏼
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
22, A couple of years ago I replaced the seal on my 68 with 120,000 miles and it leaked. Pulled it apart and put a sleeve in.
On my 67 I did not want to take the risk of putting it back together and it leaking. It was cheap insurance. Pinion had 300K+ miles on it.
Im planning on cleaning it all up afterwards and if it leaks again i will be installing the crush sleeve
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Just did this job on the 8” on my 69…..Looks like you already got the universal apart, but I found that rotating the driveshaft a bit not only improved access to the nuts, but also brought those u-bolts to a point where they’d just barely slip out.

If you’re just replacing the pinion seal and nut you won’t see the crush sleeve - that’s buried inside the diff - folks here are talking about a sleeve made of a very thin metal that slips over the shaft to make up for a worn groove deep enough to make your leak come back….will that groove catch the tip of a sharp pick? If not, you shouldn’t need the sleeve.

Consider the procedure described in the FSM. It begins with removing the rear wheels and drums and using an inch/pound torque wrench on the pinion nut to determine the existing preload. This value is important and specified in the FSM. The FSM goes on to tell you how much more you should tighten it after installing the new seal and pinion nut.

There’s a difference between the amount of torque applied to the pinion nut to get it tighter during installation and the measurement in inch/pounds of the force required to keep the pinion nut rotating once you get it to move in the “preload testing stage.”

Many folks are comfortable and familiar enough with the job to use other methods - counting the number of threads exposed on the end of the shaft, use of impacts, etc. Remember that the goal is to get the new nut on there at the same tightness it was before plus a smidge more….That “smidge more” is detailed in the FSM but is also found in decades of guys knowing just how much tighter to hit it - but if you over-tighten it, the preload is wrecked.

I’m an FSM guy, but in fairness, the pinion nuts on most of these 55 year old cars have likely been replaced “outside” the FSM for decades. I’d start with the FSM and then, if you’re so inclined, slim down the procedure based on experience and results.
Can i put grease on the the seal for a better fit/seal
 

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The crush sleeve has nothing to do with the leak.

My take is if you have it apart, put a sleeve on it. Cheap insurance while you have it apart.

Yours doesn't really have a groove, but it would not hurt to sleeve it.
 
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