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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Car Motor vehicle
All of the alignment shops here don’t know how to align my 65. Had a massive scare when I got home from school. Oh top of that we’ve made our way through three of the local shops but nobody can get it right. I now have to replace both front tires as they’re worn to an unsafe amount. Anyone local in the Santa Barbara area in Cali?
 

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Can’t help with the local alignment shop query, but can point out that you can buy really nice digital alignment tools and do it yourself.

The cost of the tools would not be much more than a shop will change for an alignment, and the results if you do it are bound to be more precise because you care. Not difficult to learn the procedure either.

To a shop it’s just another annoying old car. They’d likely just set the toe-in and charge you for a complete camber / caster / toe alignment job.

Z
 

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I don’t know if any shops in the Santa Barbara area, but Marlo’s frame and alignment in Van Nuys seems to always get recommended to those with classic cars.

It’ll be a bit of a drive for you from SB, though.
 

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Any time an alignment shop checks or adjusts the front end you should get a printout or screenshot of the numbers. Knowing the readout would be a help right now. You could need a simple toe adjustment, or need critical parts replaced.
You have to find a classic car friendly shop.
 

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67 Fastback T5, 331 stroker, TCI Frt End, Canted 4 link rear, 3.55 gears
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You might want to check with a local speed shop. Since speed shops generally sell wheels, but don't do mechanical work, their recommendations are based on what will make their customers happy. At least that was my experience...
 

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well that didn't happen overnight
plenty of alignment shops that can handle classics
talk to some car club guys or folks at shows.
i bet the same 3 names will come up all day
 

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I have given up on having anything but machine work done for any of my cars.
The best thing about our cars is that it is not that hard to do yourself.
Without more pictures, we can only guess at the cause, but my first thought is toe, which is the easiest thing to set.
I would also look at the manufacture date of the tires, the sidewall looks ok, but not so sure the inside of your tire was ok.
Even if you buy "new" tires, they can sit on the shelf for years and get rotten before you get them.

First I would check the camber with a stick and your smart phone and a level app. 1 degree in at the top is a good starting point.
Second, did it wear the same on both sides? if not then you need to deal with caster. Add caster to the side the car pulls towards, or remove from opposite.
Caster is what creates the self centering and usually we do not have enough, so I doubt you can over do this.
To set toe, I got some kite string, starting at one of the front fenders, run the string past the front tire, past the rear, wrap around to the other side of the car, past the rear, then past the front. Use masking tape to keep the string on rear tires 1/2 way up.
Then, with the steering wheel straight ahead, at the front wheels, move the string to where it just touches the back portion of the sidewall. Check the room between the front part of the string and the tire.
Do same for other side.
It should be less than 1/16 per side, which added up = 1/8. inch. Some recommend 1/32 per side which gives 1/16 total.
Best plan is to be under the car adjusting the rods while having someone else work the strings.
 

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All of the above. The last time that I saw wear like that was on my '75 Camaro with Goodyear tires. I wore them out by screaming them through canyon roads in Colorado. Great grip, lots of squeal.
Guess who makes Kelly tires? Yep, Goodyear. If you choose to buy a matching set for the front you may repeat the wear pattern. I would buy something different for the front and have the alignment set at the same time. I have not seen that wear pattern on BFGoodrich Radial T/As as an example of something affordable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can’t help with the local alignment shop query, but can point out that you can buy really nice digital alignment tools and do it yourself.

The cost of the tools would not be much more than a shop will change for an alignment, and the results if you do it are bound to be more precise because you care. Not difficult to learn the procedure either.

To a shop it’s just another annoying old car. They’d likely just set the toe-in and charge you for a complete camber / caster / toe alignment job.

Z
Unfortunately the last part is completely true. One of the last shops I went to left my strut rod nut loose(adjustable) and didn’t put a cotter pin in. Heard a tinkle of metal on the way to school and found all the bushings off one of the rods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
All of the above. The last time that I saw wear like that was on my '75 Camaro with Goodyear tires. I wore them out by screaming them through canyon roads in Colorado. Great grip, lots of squeal.
Guess who makes Kelly tires? Yep, Goodyear. If you choose to buy a matching set for the front you may repeat the wear pattern. I would buy something different for the front and have the alignment set at the same time. I have not seen that wear pattern on BFGoodrich Radial T/As as an example of something affordable.
No argument there, that’s proof. My dad has the same tires on his 69 chevelle and doesn’t carve corners… he did daily it about 30 miles for work for years and had no problems. It just depends on how good they do.
 

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Years ago I replaced my drag link and attempted to adjust toe in my driveway. I rushed through it not doing it properly. This was on preparation driving my 66 150 miles to our new house. I wore my tires pretty much like yours but not that far. Once at my new house I proceeded to install my Street or Track suspension. I was going to send it out for alignment but I didn't know anything of local shops or even if they would touch my car. I thought why can't I do my own alignment? It turned out to be the best thing I could have done! The Ford shop manual has a excellent chapter on doing alignment. Along with instructions from the caster/camber gauge very straightforward. Because I did, i discovered my stock lower control arms were shot. The bushings were completely wasted.

Caster, camber and toe are all inter related. You change one, it effects another. In your case I say your toe is way off. I wouldn't be shocked to find that one of your issues with toe being off and shops doing multiple alignments and still not getting it right could be worn lower control arm bushings. I would suggest checking your whole suspension for wear in addition to the lower arms.

Setting toe isn't too hard. You need a flat floor and a couple 3 mil black plastic contractors garbage bags folded up under the tires to allow the suspension to unload and relax to normal ride height. To adjust toe in or out, one one side the sleeve has to be turned to the front of the car and the other to the rear. You don't need a lot, go in 1/8 turn. To center the steering wheel, turn both adjusting sleeves either front or rear.
 
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