Vintage Mustang Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
45,023 Posts
Have you checked the condition of the points, their gap, and tested the condenser?

How old is the fuel and does it contain ethanol?

When you run it and then shut it down, does it crank over at the same speed as it does when it's "cold"? If not, have you performed a voltage drop test on the starting circuit?

Assuming you have the OE Holley carburetor, have you checked/adjusted the float levels?

As for the OE-type "Hot Air Choke", the tubes attach at the rear of the RH exhaust manifold as shown by the arrows....
Wood Tail Art Pattern Font
 

· Registered
Joined
·
45,023 Posts
Its my friends car

I havent checked the point gap yet. I will check tomorrow.

How do you check the condenser? If your multimeter doesn't have a selection for capacitance a quick test is to set the meter to an OHMS scale. First, touch the capacitors lead wire to its body. Then place the RED lead on the lead wire and BLACK lead on the condenser body. Watch the meter. It should begin to increase at a regular pace. When it stops, reverse the leads on the condenser and watch the meter. It should decrease at the same rate it increased and return to zero. What you are doing is charging and discharging the condenser using the meter's internal battery. If the meter doesn't move or jumps to a low-ohm value and stays there, or doesn't discharge, it's probably bad. If you DO have a capacitance function on your meter the typical condenser should test at around 100-250nF (nanoFarad).

and perform a voltage drop test on the starting circuit? You begin by disconnecting and grounding the coil high-tension wire. Wwith your multimeter set on the DC volt scale with the RED lead on the battery positive post and the BLACK lead on the "common" side (front facing) big lug on the starter solenoid and have someone crank the engine. You then move the RED lead to the "common" lug and the BLACK lead to the "starter side" big lug and crank again. Then you move the RED lead to the "starter side" big lug and the BLACK lead to the lug on the starter motor and crank again. Then you move the RED lug to the lug on the starter motor and the BLACK lead to a clean spot on the bellhousing and crank again. Then you move the RED lug to a clean spot on the bellhousing and the BLACK lug to the negative battery post and crank again. At each test, you should have a minimal voltage drop.... around 0.1vDC or less.... except for across the solenoid which may be as high as 0.2-0.3vDC and across the starter motor, itself, for which I'd be concerned with a drop of more than 0.5vDC.

The float levels have been checked and its the original carb. FWIW, I've seen a lot of float levels set too high. Fuel just barely touching the threads at the bottom the sight plug is plenty.


Thanks for the exhaust pictures. How doest the tubes attach to the carb? I can see were the one treads into the choke housing, does the other tube attach to tube at the top of the carb?

Yes, the tube with the cloth heat insulation attaches at the bottom of the choke housing using the compression nut. The other tube is connected via a short rubber hose to a nipple protruding from an angle at the underside of the carburetor air horn (see photo below)
Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Rim Automotive exterior Machine
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top