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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My rustang has a lot of well.... rusty places. I've removed almost all of the interior, some of the windows, and started sanding and such.


The biggest issues for me are...


#1 what's the best way to get rid of the old paint on the whole body?

#2 what's the best way to remove the rusty metal pieces?

#3 how do i remove the front/rear glass?

#4 is sand blasting, soda blasting, bead blasting, paint stripping, sanding, or chemical dipping going to give me the best overall results in removing the small deposits of paint/rust/gunk on the car



thanks guys!
 

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Since you won't be reusing the rubber seals, I would suggest just cutting along the exterior of the rubber gasket seal, and then lifting the whole windshield/rear window out. That is what I did. The moldings however, are another story. Search on here, but there are good instructions that will show you how to pull those. You want to be extra careful with them. You don't want to have to find replacements, and repops leave, well something to be desired according to posts.

As someone who has media blasted, sand has silica in it and can be hazardous to your health according to published information, it is an extremely messy process should you decide to take it on yourself. I actually built a tarp booth in my garage with hooks that I put up whenever I am blasting, and I have plastic on my floor to make clean up that much easier.

I use Black Diamond, available at Northern Tool for about $8 for 50lbs. It has good cut, and is good for about 4-5 recyclings. What I do is filter it through a metal screen that I picked up at Home Depot. I dump my plastic from the floor into a bin, and then sift the stuff into another bin before reusing the media. I actually sift it before I ever use it since there are occasionally particles that are to big for the blaster nozzel. In any case, invest in a good respirator, and the blasting hood, and a bunch of extra plastic shields. Trust me you will need them, and expect to be snotting black stuff regardless.

Even still, you will have to take and manually remove anything that is like seam sealer, undercoating, and or heavy bondo. I use a combination of a wire wheel, or brush cup, and or a cold steel chisel to chip the heavy stuff off first. Be prepared to find more damange than you originally thought with blasting as well. You also need a good air supply. The bigger the nozzel, the more air you are gonna need, and the faster you will burn through media. In hind sight, I would have bought at a minimum, a 100lb blaster over my 40lb one. It last a good while, but not long enough. You also need drier air.

Let me know if you have any questions on what I covered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My biggest concerns with sandblasting is that I have no place to do so. In order to have it sandblasted, it would have to be done by a business or someone with that as their hobby.

I've been using paint stripper to remove paint, but like with the sandblasting can be harmful to your health, and takes many times over one spot just to get through all the paint and primer. (it has primer paint primer paint primer)


I've been hearing expect to pay about $1,000 to have the whole shell blasted (with everything already removed and ready for the job). If I can find a way to sandblast it myself I most definitely will!



How hard is it to sandblast? I've been hearing that there is problems with big pieces of metal (roof, hood, trunk, etc) and heat? What is the story with that?


Thanks!
 

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I have heard those stories, but never experienced a problem myself using my pressure pot blaster from Harbor Freight. It has done a great job stripping 90% of my car. I did my roof, one door, quarter panels, trunk lid, engine bay, all with no heat/warpage issues. It does burn up alot of air, so you have to have a compressor that can keep up or you will spend forever waiting on it to cycle.

If you have a garage and a big compressor, you can sandblast it yourself, it is just a real mess. Any future project I do, I plan to have professionally blasted. It is well worth the money to me to save the time and mess. Saying that, I am a cheap bastard, so I will in reality be doing it myself again. :lol:

If the paint stripper is not working well, try coating the car panel, and then covering the stripper with aluminum foil or plastic wrap to trap the vapors in and allow it to work better. I have heard that works, but test and make sure it doesn't eat whatever you cover it with, thus contributing to the mess.

Even if you get it professionally blasted, there will still be some areas that won't clean up completely. You will still have to scrap and sand some areas to get them down to bare metal. Heavy seam sealer, and the tarry black stuff they put in some places just doesn't like to come off.
 

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DrYLiNT,fill out your user profile so maybe someone near you might be able to steer in the direction of a good blaster! If i had to do my 69 over i would have taken it to the blaster first thing instead of after the metal work was done.I think if it's ready for the blaster find one and try to work out a deal so maybe after the body is done you can drag in some misc. parts later on,Most will work with you.$1000.00 sounds like alot of money and it is but they do it for a living and can get it done and do a better job than you can prolly do in a 1/3 of the time and besides when you get it back from the blaster it's alot easier to see and fix all the rusty area's.Just try'en to help,good luck. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Cost is definitely an issue, but cleanup is the exact reason why I can't use the garage (college student at home).


Im not sure what I will do, but it's definitely going to involve cutting as many financial corners as I can (i.e.- hand sanding 90% of it)
 

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blasting can be very expensive. We had my F/B blasted and coated w/ red oxide and sealer for about 1500. he did, however, warp both of my QPS. I would suggest blastikng though, especially if you can do it yourself
 

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If you enclose the area you are blasting well, you will only have some dust that escapes, something you are gonna have problems with even sanding by hand.
 

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Sandblasting is very messy. I would not even consider doing it in an enclosed area. Even with plastic sheeting all around you will get a fine dust everywhere.

Do it outside on a concrete surface. You can sweep up and recycle about 1/2 of it that way (filter it before reusing). It will take a LOT of air. I use #5 sandblasting sand about the consistency of sugar. Leaves a nice finish. Personally I would NEVER blast an external body surface. Too easy to warp it. Also, to do a car right you need a rotisserie. Be prepared for sand to continue "oozing" out for months afterward.

For your situation I think that you would be better off farming the blasting out to somebody. Although a sandblaster works great for parts like engine brackets, pulleys, rear ends, suspension parts, etc.
 
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