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Discussion Starter #1
i asked about this before and got no help. when i spray on the primer i get a bunch of furry crap everywhere. almost as if it dries before it touches the car then i paint over it and its all lumpy so i have to sand it down and redo just to have the same sh** happen again. im getting very sick of this and hope this time somebody will help. should i use less thinner? or what. the gun was clean. took it apart and cleaned it so it was not that. i am seriously considering using rustoleum rusty metal primer in a spray can to prime my car. and once again its a devlilbiss hvlp gravity feed gun and im using the crappy red oxide primer that looks like rustoleum anyways. at about 10 psi. thanx

Corpus Christi TX
 

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That rustoleum rusty metal primer wil just gum up and ball if you try to sand it. If you're first starting to cover-up some rusty/pitted body areas, once you've phosphated or converted the rust seal it with epoxy primer. Apply a primer-surfacer. Even if it's thick that's OK. Sand and wetsand out the primer until there's imperfections in the surface. You may have to apply a couple more Primer-surfacer coats. Just before shooting color, use a tack rag to remove all dust and debris from the surface. Start off with one thin coat. Let it dry, tack cloth.now apply your color coats a little more liberally.

Tom Kubler, Long-time Mustang Enthusiast & San Antonio Mustang Club Founder
 

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Actually, the Rustoleum "Rusty Metal Primer" in spray cans wet sands quite nicely and feather edges great as long as the metal surface was sanded prior to primering. Of course, it takes longer to dry than regular auto type primers. I've had some good results with it in areas that I wanted better rust protection and have even top coated it with lacquers. However, I'm not recommending it in place of compatible auto refinishing paints as it may cause problems, just sticking up for it somewhat from my own experiences. The original question regarding the creation of "fur" when shooting primer (lacquer based??) is somewhat familiar. I remember this happeniong to me. The more primer that I sprayed over an area produced an even more coarser "furrier" finish that looked like I was shooting sand instead of paint. I can't remember the remedy except to say that it was the gun, gun settings, mix ratio, or my techniques (obviously). Recently, I have been using a syphon type (non-HVLP) gun at about 40 lbs pressure and mixing the primer/paint at about 100% thinner. For this non-expert, amatuer painter, it has produced a relatively smooth, run free surface for both the primers and the finish lacquer coats. So the only suggestions I can offer is to change your methods and see if anything helps. If not, then try a different type of gun just to see if you do better. My results so far can be seen at our Mustang club's website ( www.geocities.com/cbmc_md/ ) as they have some pictures posted. I do want to try one of those HVLP guns soon. As with welding and other skills that you are learning/developing during your restoration, it don't come easy; but you will eventually get it sorted out.

66 Fastback
85 GT Hatchback
67 Coupe
82 GT Hatchback
 

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You've got it mixed too thick. I reduce my primer 1:1, maybe more. When you spray primer if you have it mixed correct it'll be slick to the touch. With just a bit of overspray. Shouldn't be any "furry crap". Primer dries faster than base or clear. So if you leave it in the container or gun it will get thicker in a hurry.

Lancaster, South Carolina
66 Coupe, 302, Auto, 3.25 gears. [color:red]Candyapple Red</font color=red> with White Pearl Stripes. Cragars.
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I had that happen the first time I used a real spray gun. Until then I'd only worked with cans. Turned out I didn't use the correct amounts of primer/thinner to get the desired result. With a different ration on the components the spraying went better and looked great too.

Columbo
http://members.brabant.chello.nl/a.schroeders/Columbo66.jpg http://members.brabant.chello.nl/a.schroeders/Columbo66_2.jpg
First time rolling restoration, 66 289 nearing completion.
 
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When you say you have about 10 psi at the gun, is that 10 at the air cap or is it your inlet presure? I use a Sharpe Cobalt gun (HVLP) and need 30-40 psi inlet pressure for 10 at the tip. This is as per the Sharpe web site.
 
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