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Discussion Starter #1
The biggest pain in the arse of my car right now is figuring out how to do the paint... and its a major neccissary step. Never been repainted, needs to go bare metal because it pretty much already is.

It was originaly vintage burgandy, but im going like the brightest white i can find, i heard Taurus SHO white or something, anyways....

1 - Can i do all the primering without a paint booth, just do it in the open air? (epoxy primer/sealer)
2 - Can i jamb it in the open air with no booth? i want to do all the jambs/weather strip areas/windshields/etc.

See the plan is i could primer the whole car. Then i could jamb it, including the weatherstrip and window areas. Then i could put the thing together, windows in, weatherstrip, etc, and have it daily drivable and work on the bodywork over the next several months as i go, and then apply the final finish without dissassembling it again (except for some things like door handles and such).

Will i run into any time window problems doing this or anything?
 

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Priming and jambing it in the open really should not be a problem. But as far as driving it primed i wouldn't do it as primer really should not be exposed to the elements any more than it absloutly has to.
 

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when the car is exposed to the elemets with just primer on, the water sinks down through the primer. ever notice people who prime up thier cars then a few months later they are rusting again?
 

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I just went today to talk to a paint supplier for my future body work project on my mustang. I asked about the ability of the primer to hold up against the winter months and he shook his head. He said the water will soak through and rust it all over again. At the very least, he said, if I were to be using the car while it was primered is to put any kind of paint on it, rattle can even, to protect it from getting rusty.

So you are going white eh? If you are feeling brave, try a blue or red pearl mixed in to give it a nice shinny 3d effect. It looks really neat.
 
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It is my understanding that epoxy primer is fine as it seals as well. Lesser primers are not good for weather.

Am I not correct?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
why the hell would i put rattle can paint on a proffessional quality primer? then i would just have to sand it all off and do it again....

grr.. anyone care to paint my car for me? I'll have someone buy you a six pack (cant buy it myself... underaged)
 

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The rattle can idea is not nearly as bad as you think. You could get the hole thing primered and blocked, then rattle can it. When you're ready for the real top coat, the rattle can paint can be your guide coat. You'll probably end up re-primering at least with a light coat because of the places you go through, but it could get you by.

A good paint shop (actually even most bad ones) is going to re-sand and primer before they paint anyway. They could sand your rattle can job, primer over it, then paint. No reputable paint shop is going to paint over your primer job. They have too much riding on the finished product to trust someone else's work. They will want to shoot their own primer to have their paint stick to.

Just some food for thought, and ideas to get you "over the hump".
 

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You are getting yourself all messed up with this..
There is Body Work and then there is the completely serperate work of Paint Preparation.
You should do either the jamb work or the body work. Body work is just fixing the dent or rust area and priming it. Same with the jambs but be ready to apply the finish coat to those,
Do both of those and see where you stand. If you are ready then, then go for the Paint Prep and sand the body down ,prime and paint..real quick. By the way, understanding from your earlier post about selling, the body work is very cheap to do. Maybe your situation will have changed by the time you fisnish it and you can keep the car..
 

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I think I'm replying to post backwards, but anyway. Once you get the bodywork done , you're ready for an "all over" primer coat. Then one or two more-depending. Then you're ready to "block" the car. All pro bodymen I've ever seen spray the primer with cheapo rattle can paint, then proceed with the block sanding. They generally use very light coats but a pro told me a regular coat would be fine. The spray can stuff sands off very easily, "pro" primer is a lot more resistant.
What I suggest is basically the way my car IS right now. The real final sanding will before it goes to paint. All the paints I've been using have been approved by the guy who will paint my car. He's got plenty of references and a good selection of "Best Paint" awards, so i do as he suggests.
 
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