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Getting into a restoration of a '65 I bought in Greeley CO in mid 1980's that has been sitting about 20 years. Pretty much down to the carcass at this point. For the body work, new floorpans, quarter panels, and rear panels. In removing the quarter panel I am using a spot weld cutter, air chisel, grinder/cutter and hand chisel. Is there a trick to removing the lower piece along the horizontal seam shown in the first picture. Going from behind the door pillar to just in front of the rear wheel you can see how it looks pinched above and below. Any easy way without butchering it up?

Fortunately I am in Wyoming and even stored outside exposed the rust is manageable.

Also, what gauge metal for small spot patches? I am doing all the removal prep and fitting and will have a friend weld with his mig welder in a few weeks.

Andy
 

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I don't know what you have for torch work but you could cut along the high side of the seam without a problem. Just a matter of holding your cutting torch at a steep angle (along the seam toward front or rear). Been there, done that.
 

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The inside of the quarter is just spot welded to the top of the rocker there inside the door panel. Grind it down with a wire wheel and it will reveal the spot weld witnesses. Take a 3" cutoff wheel (Harbor Freight $9.99) and grind out the spot welds--or you can use your spot weld cutter bit.

Don't remove all your panels in the rear--only one at a time. You want the others so you can align the quarter correctly. I would not have cut the entire quarter out like that because they're such a bear to get to fit well. I take a full quarter (because the skin panels suck) and cut the full quarter down to a skin. You might want to do that on the other side.

Here is how I did it. But don't weld it like I did here. While I spaced individual welds apart, I'd go and put the next weld along an existing weld for round two. Made the seam really pucker up. I had to stretch the metal, cut the entire seam back open, and weld it using a different method with individual tack welds that are never next to each other (second entry).


 

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For that section behind the door to the wheelhousing, I just used a grinder and cut-off wheel and ran it along the top of the rocker...just control the angle and its easy

For small patches, I will often just cut a section from a panel I have already removed...most panels that you cut out will still have enough good metal to work as patches...also, you already know that its the right gauge....IE taking a piece from the quarter to repair the fender, etc.

Also...something most people don't realize:



I cut the body lead seam area out entirely. Why? because the area the quarter and the roof attaches to underneath is prone to rot(inner roof structure) and needs to be critically examined...also...I am not messing around with body lead, I just welded a strip of sheet metal back in afterward...it is still a low spot, but I can fill what remains with short strand filler.

I am assuming it likes to rot under there because any moisture that gets on the inside will run down and kind of pool around the spot welds there.
 

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Thanks very much for your input. Wow, looks like some details. Melting out that lead will be tricky. I have an oxy/acetylene torch. Will be careful to melt, and not cut.

Andy
 

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Thanks very much for your input. Wow, looks like some details. Melting out that lead will be tricky. I have an oxy/acetylene torch. Will be careful to melt, and not cut.

Andy
Maybe don't use an OA torch in case that gets TOO hot. Just a simple propane torch works. It doesn't take a lot to get the lead to melt. It's quite simple, basically like melting solder. And do wear respiration and do it outside.
 
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