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Discussion Starter #1
I stopped at a gas station this morning and while turning off the ignition I noticed that I was not able to turn the key properly. I jiggled it a little bit and I was finally able to get it to turn off.

When I went to start the car the key turned but nothing happened. The key was moving much too freely. It felt like it was not engaging. I am a novice to be kind. I am assuming that something broke in the ignition area. Does that sound right? And if so what do I need to look for. Will I have to remove the dash to access this?

My car is a 65 coupe.

Thanks for any assistance.
 

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Your lock cylinder is just worn out from all these years of use.

You can buy replacements from the Mustang parts dealer and then have a local locksmith rekey it to your existing key. That way you can use the same key for your doors and ignition.
 

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Yes it is probably just the cylinder..what the key goes into to.
Get the part from NPD then post again with how to replace. Roughly you will need a needle to slide it into a small hole on the clyindder and rotate key and cylinder will come out.
Not a bad idea to take both up to locksmith and get new one keyed to old key so door lock will still work.
 

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If the key is spinning freely with no resistance, you most likely have a broken ignition switch. The same thing happened to my son's '65 2 weeks ago. The ignition switch was in 2 pieces (the switch was less than a year old, too).

Reach up under the dash as see if you can see/feel the rubber plug that's suppossed to be attached to the back of the ignition swtich. You'll likely find it dangling with half the ignition switch like we did.

You don't have to remove the gauge cluster to replace the switch, but it's much, much easier if you do.
 

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To remove the lock cylinder, straighten a paper clip to use as a tool. Disconnect the battery temporarily. Insert the key and turn to the ACC position. Insert the end of the paper clip into the little hole next to the key. Press it in about 1/16" (not very far but somewhat firmly). This will release a little lock built into the cylinder. Now while holding gentle pressure on the paper clip, turn the Key back to the ON position. Pull outward on the key and the cylinder should come out with it. Usually old cylinders will pop out immediately since they're worn.

Replace with new cylinder. Insert the key into the cylinder. The key/cylinder tab should be inserted in the orientation of the slot in the switch body. Twist the key towards ACC and then ON. It should lock in place. Before you connect the battery, rotate the key switch through all positions. If it acts normally, reconnect the battery and you're set to go.

If it acts abnormally usually jamming in the START position and not popping back to ON after START is released, its likely due to tight fitting parts jamming inside the switch/cylinder. Remove the cylinder as before and examine the actuating mechanism at the back of the cylinder. See if you can see marks on it from where it was binding. If you can, use a small file and dress the actuating mechanism (on the mark area) with a few strokes of the file. Try it again and see if it works better. If you have problems you can't fix, take both the cylinder and switch to a locksmith who can fix you up. Note: its just a matter of filing the correct spot on the actuator.
 

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As suggested by others, your cylinder is worn out.

Rather than replace the ign cylinder only and try to re-key with a badly worn key, I would suggest replacing all cylinders on the car with a set which uses the same key. This way you get new cylinders as well as new keys.

If you opt to go the route I suggest, keep one of the new keys in a safe place so that you will have an "original" to make duplicates from in the future.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info. It has been very helpful and I have no doubt I can fix it based on your advice.

Thanks again
 
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