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Discussion Starter #1
I have now gotten to my left rear quarter, and after stripping it, I have realised the PO was an absolute bondo artst. ( not a compliment) He filled in rusted out areas with bondo, and lots of it. I am going to NPD in ocala saturday, and I will be buying repair skins. The whole panels are $250 each, too much for me. The panels I will be getting go even with the top of the door, all the way to the back, $100 each. Not too bad. So do I just cut out where the old metal is rusted through, and weld the panel over what remains of the old panel, or does the whole area the size of the panel get cut out? I own a mig welder, though I have never used it. My father is a decent welder, but has never done replacement work on a car body before. I thought a repair skin just went right over whatever was damaged, and that the metal didn't need to be cut out completely, just the rusted out parts removed. Am I wrong? These may be dumb questions, but I would rather ask before I do more damage. Any advice would be appreciated. Jason
 

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Nope, either cut pieces out of the replacement and piece in patches to the original or cut off the quarter and weld the new one on. Do it much different, and the dreaded PO syndrome will kick in. ::
--Kyle
 

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Jason,
The panels you are referring to are made to be welded in by cutting the original 1/4 out about an inch below the character line and either butt weld or flange the seam to weld in the panel. When you go to NPD the guys there should be able to help answer any questions you may have.
Tell'em I said Hi!
Scott
 

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Jason,
You may want to practice up on your welding before you tack on the new skins. Be sure you use solid wire and shielding gas if you want the cleanest possible welds.

MIG definitely makes it easier. But patching skins is not easy to a newbie (at least this one). Guys on this site make it look so easy.

I got a junk door I practice on, sure does help.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was practicing with my MIG earlier. My hand is starting to get more steady. My father welded and sandblasted for many years. He used to sandblast, repair, and paint water towers around new england. He is out of practice, but I think he's still pretty good. I will be doing the welding, with him over my shoulder. Sometimes I think I'm getting in over my head, but what ever doesn't kill you will only make you stronger..... :: ::
 

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You can do it! Just take your time and measure. If you butt weld, you'll end up doing lots of small tack welds. The key is to not let the area get to hot. If it does, you will end up warping the panels. Tack, skip a couple of inches, tack, skip and so on. Then after things cool down, you do the same thing in between the tacks already there.

I haven't tackled the quarter yet, but that was the method I used for some patches I've done and the DS floor pan (not finished, but tacked in).

The other option that I've considered, but I'm not sold on it yet is using panel adhesives and doing a lap joint. No welding on the lap, only at the door jam, wheel wells, and taillight panel...oh yeah...drop-offs too. The problem with adhesives is you can't let the bonded area get hot, or the bond will fail. Just another thought.
 

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I used the $60 skins and did remove the old quarters 1" down from the beltline. I completely remove the the quarter inside the door jamb, and wheel wells... I think you are right that the skins are designed to go over old metal. It was pretty obvious to me that were oversize in the door jamb area, wheel wells, and possible by the quarter extensions. A body many told me this after I installed them, I've also heard some guys will leave the door jamb area alone, and trim the skin about an inch away from the door jamb, just so they maintain the door gap and alignment.
 

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If you can avoid skins on a 68, do it. A major problem is at the rear. The 1/4 is designed with a setback along the rear where it meets the valance. This allows the valance to fit flush. The skin lacks this feature so attacking the valance becomes a major problem. If this part of the original 1/4 can be saved, it would be possible to attach the skin that way. Saw this happen on an otherwise near perfect resto on a 68 fastback. No one knew about the problem until it came time to fit the valance. The car was painted. It is now in another shop getting redone with the 67 Dynacorn 1/4's and side scoops. Ask to see both the skin and the full 1/4 to see if this problem is on their skins.
 

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I'll throw in a vote for replacing the entire quarter, as opposed to the skin. If you weld in a skin, you are welding a long weld in a very visible area. If you cut the entire panel off at the Ford welds instead, you are re-welding at original points, and will have to grind down less in the way of visible welds. I did all new quarters on 66 vert (I know verts are easier), but I've got a 65 FB, and its gonna get the same treatment. Full quarters seem a lot easier to me.
 

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Seriously, hold off on the quarters until you really are confident with your welding. All you'll do is spend more time & money later redoing it. Trust me, I know from experience. And, as everyone else has said, don't just weld over the rusted piece, cut out and patch, or do the whole quarter.
 
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