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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I bought my 70 mustang (3 weeks ago) I knew that id have to disassemble the entire car. As of now every bolted on part is off, the car is completely gutted. I even removed the entire cowl panel area(lower, mid and upper) Bc it was rusted almost in half. I also removed the seat panels (i dont know what there called but they are spot welded on).

My goal right now is to be able to get to all areas of the car so when i go to media blast i can remove all the rust. The problem is there are areas where I know rust exists (even some rust holes) but are behind things like the roof supports and in between the firewall and thick plate that runs up the frame rails.

So my questions is can I/should I remove the roof supports and any other areas that rust is in order to media blast?

I tried to explain to the best of my ability but keep in mind i am very new to this. If i can clarify more please let me know

thank you
Jake
 

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If you're hauling this anywhere to be blasted, you'll want the supports in place as designed. Otherwise you run the risk of twisting or bending. Blast it as is, see what's left when it returns. At that point you can base your decisions on how bad the rust is. Perforations- cut and replace, surface rust- treat, seal, and call it good.
 

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I am in the process of disassembling my rust bucket right now. I am taking my time and labeling everything...which is also giving me time to develop a plan of attack. I am actually considering chemical dipping mine. It’s not cheap, but seems to be the best way thoroughly address the unseen rust.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, I’m blasting it myself. I know it’s a slow process when you want to keep strait panels but it’s more economical for me.

I think if I use a rust reformer after iv blasted only in the tight areas that are untouched by the media it’ll be ok. I still will remove as much as I can without causing any problems. It’s these things that make or break the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmm chemically dipping that sounds interesting. Could you not media blast and then spot treat all the areas that you were unable to blast? I can see how it might save a lot of headache for sure.

Haha labeling, i tore half the car apart and then started to label. Typical 18 yr old crap.
 

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I rigged up a pump and sprayer for some areas to spray Evaporust. Drilled holes in copper tube and slid it in areas I couldn't reach. For areas around roof, I turned car upside down on rotisserie and poured couple gallons of Evaporust into the roof area and tipped it back and forth.
 

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I always thought chemical dipping would be ideal, but after seeing the 72 Mach on the youtube channel "Autorestomod" and the rust streaks from the lapped joints years afterwards I am thinking that is not the way to go.
 

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I rigged up a pump and sprayer for some areas to spray Evaporust. Drilled holes in copper tube and slid it in areas I couldn't reach. For areas around roof, I turned car upside down on rotisserie and poured couple gallons of Evaporust into the roof area and tipped it back and forth.
Doesn't the part have to be submerged, for hours, in evaporust to remove the rust?
 

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Chemical dipping followed by an e-coat process would be best, but for most of us it is not affordable or doesn't make money sense (about $4,000). That's the only way to get inside frame rails and all the inner hidden spots. Media blasting is the next best thing but will only get rid of what you can see. Some guys that have the time, money, and expertise may cut panels off as needed, do the rust removal, and then reinstall the panels. A lot of work and time to do that. Unless it is a high dollar car that justifies the expense, most restorers cut out the rotted panels as needed and don't worry about the places that you can not get at anyways without dipping.
 

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Doesn't the part have to be submerged, for hours, in evaporust to remove the rust?
Every time I've used it, it did. Mainly for bolts and brackets.

Also, if you use it in place that you can not get at, how will you clean those surface to apply some sort of protection? It would be like poring primer over an oily or dirty surface and expecting it to stick.
 

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Doesn't the part have to be submerged, for hours, in evaporust to remove the rust?
That is the reason for the pump and sprayer. I had a big tarp under the work area to capture and direct the Evaporust back into a big plastic bin where the pump would recirculate it, keeping the metal wet with it. Works best warm so I also had a cheap aquarium heater keeping it warm. It was similar to the 8th picture in this article.

https://www.hotrod.com/articles/hrdp-0901-rust-removal-guide/#hrdp_0901_10_z-rust_removal_guide-safest_rust_remover

I watched a video where they did a truck frame a section at a time this way.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Doesn't the part have to be submerged, for hours, in evaporust to remove the rust?
Every time I've used it, it did. Mainly for bolts and brackets.

Also, if you use it in place that you can not get at, how will you clean those surface to apply some sort of protection? It would be like poring primer over an oily or dirty surface and expecting it to stick.
That’s a good point. I’m wondering if some sort of protecting rust reformer like por15 would do the job better. I personally will have access to 98% of the cars surface. Just due to the fact that so many panels were rusted. But still there must be a way to remove the rust from inside the roof rails AND protect them from further rust.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Doesn't the part have to be submerged, for hours, in evaporust to remove the rust?
That is the reason for the pump and sprayer. I had a big tarp under the work area to capture and direct the Evaporust back into a big plastic bin where the pump would recirculate it, keeping the metal wet with it. Works best warm so I also had a cheap aquarium heater keeping it warm. It was similar to the 8th picture in this article.

https://www.hotrod.com/articles/hrdp-0901-rust-removal-guide/#hrdp_0901_10_z-rust_removal_guide-safest_rust_remover

I watched a video where they did a truck frame a section at a time this way.
I’d rather just take everything off at that point. It would probably costs less money and take the same amount of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Chemical dipping followed by an e-coat process would be best, but for most of us it is not affordable or doesn't make money sense (about $4,000). That's the only way to get inside frame rails and all the inner hidden spots. Media blasting is the next best thing but will only get rid of what you can see. Some guys that have the time, money, and expertise may cut panels off as needed, do the rust removal, and then reinstall the panels. A lot of work and time to do that. Unless it is a high dollar car that justifies the expense, most restorers cut out the rotted panels as needed and don't worry about the places that you can not get at anyways without dipping.
This makes the most sense to me. So your looking at 3x the amount it would cost to media blast. But it’s also coated everywhere. It seems like the only other way to truly remove rust and be able to put a coat of protection on the bare metal is to remove the panels needed and media blast
 

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I have removed so many panels at this point I have stripped and re-painted most areas...but I wont be able to do that with the inner roof structure(or dont want to at least) so I have resigned myself to just blasting everything I can reach and if I ever need to I can replace the roof later on...the good thing is vertical panels like that tend to rust very very slowly so chances are it will be 30 years before I have to worry about it...from what I saw at the time of quarter panel removal, it was still just surface rust there. The real question is how far your restoration is going...mine is stopping at about 90% for the time being...there is a definitely a point of diminishing returns and most "restored" cars never reach 100% and that is ok. I drew my personal line at removing the roof arbitrarily. I will make(or buy) a spray wand like Huntingky and spray some type of rust treatment in there, but I dont expect whatever I do to be a silver bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So it seems the decision for anyone with rust in these areas is how much time are they willing to commit NOW. Because your either taking it off now or spraying it and taking it off later. You also run the risk of damaging your current roof rails and roof and might have to replace something that could have lasted you years before rotting out.

Definitely an interesting decision to make
 

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IMHO, you remove enough pieces to repair any rust that HAS affected structural integrity. Any "superficial rust" can typically be treated to render it inert, then sealed or "encapsulated" in a product specifically made to perform that function.
 
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