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Thanks 66#3, that is reassuring. Did you have to flush out the evaporator to make sure there was no R-12 left in it?

On NPD website, I see only one condenser option. Should I be looking elsewhere? Why a bigger condenser?
I bought a commercially made flush product from O'Reilly's. I've read that I could use alcohol among other things. Ironically, alcohol was nowhere to be found when I did the work due to COVID. The off-the-shelf product worked great. I followed with a few squirts of compressed air.

I took my mustang to a repair shop for charging (after I tried 3 times and couldn't do it to my satisfaction.) There, when we were talking about the old evaporator and the new condenser, the guy said ideally you should have a condenser that is 3x the area of the evaporator, and he thought my combination was perfect (new condenser from Old Air Products and OEM evaporator.)

You'd asked about whether or not to replace the expansion valve. I would and did. It' s a small effort while you're in there, at least in my application. For me, it seemed unwise to use a 50 year old expansion valve when most everything else was new.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thanks for the feedback. Very helpful.
 

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I'd clean everything real good and install new seals and new heater core. Then add a new condenser, drier, lines and sanden style compressor. Charge and enjoy.
 

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Flade, is your compressor a restored original York or the aluminum repro that NPD and others sell? That is the look I want.
Its a restored original I pulled off a junker. CAA restored it. Normally it would be painted black, but on Shelby’s they left them aluminum. I intend to eventually restore the car as a Shelby clone, so I had them do it in natural aluminum. I think it really brightens up the engine bay.
 

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Flade, beautiful engine bay, by the way.
Thanks, glad You like it. Was lots of work cleaning it up. The car had run in 12 years when I got it.
 

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Consolidating some of my prior questions along with some new ones...

Can I re-use my existing expansion valve?
Can I re-use my existing compressor valves?
What is the difference between integral A/C and factory A/C?
Is there any easy way to confirm that my existing York compressor has NOT already been converted to R-134? All along I have been assuming the current setup was for R-12, but I guess it's possible the PO did the conversion before the condenser failed.
You can reuse the valve if it is undamaged. CAA checked out the one I pulled from te junk yard, cleaned it up and confirmed it was good. In general, they don’t wear out.

The compressors valves are likely fine, but will need new seals. If running R134 you will need to get adaptors.

From 67 on all Factory A/C was integral.

To convert to R134 the only thing done to the compressor is to flush it and replace the oil. r12 oil is not compatible with R134. The valves will be the best indication of what you have.

Get the new Improved condenser from CAA, it looks Original but is more efficient.
 

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Classic Auto Air now sells their original restoration services Under the name Original Air Group. Here is the Improved Condenser
67-68 Mustang/Cougar A/C Condenser

any time you open the system up you need to replace the Receiver Dryer.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I'm getting conflicting feedback on how hard it is to convert my factory compressor to R134 and whether I can do it myself. Is it as simple as emptying the existing oil as much as possible and then replacing it with a pint of ester oil? Do I need to change any gaskets? My factory compressor appears to be in good physical shape and the clutch turned on and rotated as it should when it was installed and connected. Given that I want to stick with a factory looking setup, I'd rather continue to use my own original compressor and I'd rather do the work myself if that is feasible. Or is the process more complicated than it appears?
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I know places like Original Air have compressor restoration services for a pretty penny and I'm trying to stick to a budget, so I want to at least explore the DIY option.

And to reiterate to those who haven't read the entire thread, I do NOT want a Sanden so please don't suggest it. :)
 

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G, why are you looking at converting ? The R134a doesn't have as good of a Delta T as does the R12. If you're going to go old school on the other pieces, why not keep R12 ? LSG
 

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Discussion Starter #31
LSG -- Thanks for putting forth a very good question -- I'm not sure I have a very good answer. :)

Originally, I thought I didn't have a choice but to use R134 because I live in California and I think I read somewhere that it is really hard to not only find R12 (I have since learned it can be bought on eBay) but also to find someone in California who would charge and fill the system with R12 once I installed the system. But perhaps that was bad info? Can anyone confirm whether AC installers in California will work with R12?
 

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Can't speak to CA, but typically a certified AC tech can install R12. Pricey, due to punitive taxes, but the Mustang system uses only 1 3/4 pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
So if I stick with R12:

My factory compressor has been sitting unused for years. Do I need to replace the oil simply due to the fact that it might be 50 years old? Anything else I need to do?

I don't know if it matters, but I uninstalled the entire system about three years ago. Can I continue to use my factory compressor valves, expansion valve and receiver dryer? Or do they tend to degrade over time and require restoration, cleaning, replacement, etc.?

I know I have to replace my condenser (original was physically broken at the connection point to the receiver) and hoses no matter what.

Thanks for any feedback.
 

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Converting to R134 requires:

1. Replace all hoses with barrier hose
2. Drain and remove all old oil from the system
3. Flush the system to remove contaminants
4. Replace the Receiver/Dryer
5. Refill with R134 compatible oil.
6. add R134 conversion valves to your R12 valves
7. Evacuate the system and check for leaks
8. Refill with R134

Unless you had a compressor failure that contaminated your system, the expansion valve, compressor valves, condenser and Evaporator should be good.

If you ave the Evaporator out of the car, consider rebuilding it as the foam inside is likely trash.

Consider switching to the CAA improved condenser

Leaks are the biggest issue with R134 since the molecule up is about 100 times small we than R12. This is why you have to replace the hoses. R134 can leave right through R12 hoses.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Hey Flade, thanks for the feedback but now I'm leaning toward sticking with R12. Should I replace the compressor oil simply due to the fact that the oil in there might be 50 years old? Do the factory compressor valves, expansion valve and receiver dryer tend to degrade over time and require restoration, cleaning, replacement, etc.?
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I'm not taking out the evaporator. But I will get the CAA improved condenser, as my factory one is busted and has to be replaced regardless. I will probably also replace the receiver dryer and of course the hoses.
 

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I would flush out your lines and evaporator. Drain the compressor and use fresh oil. This is the only way to know you have the right amount in there. I have a couple hoses available. They are good 67/68 hoses but not concours correct if that matters to you. The receiver /dryer has an internal desiccant that degrades when exposed to moisture. It needs to be replaced whenever you open the lines to the system for any length of time. Everything else should be good..
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Flade, I just PMed you.
 

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I'd ditch the r12 idea, you re going to be updating/replacing a lot of the system so just go 134 since its more common.

My 64 just got a complete underdash vintage air system and I have around $1200 in it. That was buying their compressor bracket and their evaporator. So you remove the evaporator, and compressor bracket off as you can reuse yours, you have about $700 in a new system.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Thanks, but as I have written multiple times in this thread, I don't want to use a Sanden compressor as I want an original look and am willing to sacrifice some horsepower. I have a working factory compressor so my out of pocket expense is limited to hoses, condenser, and receiver/dryer.

Questions:

What is involved in draining the oil from the compressor? Do I simply remove the bolt on top and turn over the compressor to let the oil run out? Or is it more complex than that?

What is involved in removing contaminants from the compressor and evaporator? Is it just using compressed air or is it more complex? If some type of liquid is required to decontaminate, what liquid and how do I get it to run through the compressor and evaporator? For what it is worth, the hoses (which I am not reusing) have been disconnected from both the evaporator and compressor.

Thanks.
 
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