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Sherif, the GTP heads have a slightly altered plug angle and have 1.84 ( 351W ) sized intake valves. The bigger intake valve gives a little more power, but you can also put bigger valves in the 289 heads you already have. I'd be adding hard seats under the exhausts for long term durability. Which seats you need will depend on which valves you choose. You have to pick valves to match whether you rail rockers or not. You can't just pick by year, some of the 66 heads are short, some are long, and in 50 years these cars have had lots of parts swapped. You have rail rockers, and they are worn enough you should replace them. You should also replace the valve springs. On the guides, have the shop ream the guides and then install thinwall bronze liners, its an awesome setup. Instead of the MTF-1, or the cam Tom has, how about a Comp 35-255-5 ? You'll like it, the driveability is excellent. Aluminum heads are a foolish choice if you have a 2 barrel and iron exhaust. The heads may be awesome, but if they can't pull mixture through your 2V iron intake, and they can't blow exhaust out through your restrictive iron, they'll do nothing for you.
What is this idea about valves being expensive ? If you're paying more than $10~12 each, where are you shopping ? Do you need part numbers for the valves and seats ?

The shop I retired from is owned by a Ford guy, I'm a Ford guy, and we measured the notches in the H273CP as 8 cc and the 3101HC measured in at 4cc. For 99% of the 289s that get built, it is the best choice. The other pistons are fine, and they will work, but they will give you less compression.

Are you going to keep the iron intake and exhausts ? Or is better coming in the future ? If you are sticking to stock irons, you should step back to the Howards cam WoodChuck named. LSG
 

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Discussion Starter #22
You have rail rockers, and they are worn enough you should replace them. You should also replace the valve springs. On the guides, have the shop ream the guides and then install thinwall bronze liners, its an awesome setup.
Yes, I have rail rockers, but I need to change them. I was thinking about PQX-0830202
Valves (SLP-V-1783 and SLP-V-1784) I have already chosen. I was not thinking about a change, but if I can do easily what is you recommendation ? What about guides and seats ?
My engine guy told me that those iron are better then bronze and he is not sure if he has a drill for non-metric diameter of such guide. In worst case he has his own guides.

Instead of the MTF-1, or the cam Tom has, how about a Comp 35-255-5 ?
After research and discussion with Summit's team I think I will go with
SUM-K30032

35-255-5 is more expensive and I am looking for camshaft_lifter kits. I have seen CL31-234-3 it looks almost same ..

The shop I retired from is owned by a Ford guy, I'm a Ford guy, and we measured the notches in the H273CP as 8 cc and the 3101HC measured in at 4cc. For 99% of the 289s that get built, it is the best choice. The other pistons are fine, and they will work, but they will give you less compression.

Are you going to keep the iron intake and exhausts ? Or is better coming in the future ?
Good to know it, I have calculated compression on 3101 and it looks better then OEM ;) . Now my aim is to finish a car, register it and make a first drive, then I can think about modifications but carb (which I have already rebuild) and manifolds I had a plan to use stock ones.

Thank you very much for your help !!!
 

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Sherif, the bronze liner inside of the iron guide is best. Can he not do that ? If he doesn't have the tooling for guide work, maybe you should look for someone else. The rockers you're showing are fine, the single pattern cam is not such a good choice. I'll have valve & seat numbers later today. LSG
 

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Sherif, before we get into part numbers, have you asked your guy about the guides ? If he thinks iron is best, ask him why. I would obviously disagree. We like the thinwall bronze alloy because they have very good wear and lubricity. They are also not a difficult install, you get to keep most of your original iron guide for support, just a light reaming to get the liners in. The bronze guides are very gentle on the valvestems. AND, if you should ever need new liners 150K miles later, they are easily replaced. Your engine has 11/32 gudes & stems, that is THE most common size out there is, there are millions of engines out there with that size. If your guy can't line the most common valveguide out there,.....does he really have enough tooling for the job ? The guides are the first thing you do on a valvejob. How do you install seats and cut them if you don't have a concentric gude to work from ? If your man has some reason you should stick to unlined iron, I'm all ears. LSG
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Sherif, before we get into part numbers, have you asked your guy about the guides ? If he thinks iron is best, ask him why. I would obviously disagree. We like the thinwall bronze alloy because they have very good wear and lubricity. They are also not a difficult install, you get to keep most of your original iron guide for support, just a light reaming to get the liners in. The bronze guides are very gentle on the valvestems. AND, if you should ever need new liners 150K miles later, they are easily replaced. Your engine has 11/32 gudes & stems, that is THE most common size out there is, there are millions of engines out there with that size. If your guy can't line the most common valveguide out there,.....does he really have enough tooling for the job ? The guides are the first thing you do on a valvejob. How do you install seats and cut them if you don't have a concentric gude to work from ? If your man has some reason you should stick to unlined iron, I'm all ears. LSG
ok will ask him why he prefer such ones. It looks experienced and has a workshop since many years. He just mentioned me that some of non-metric drills are not accessible here where I supposed they need to be very accurate to prepare a hole for guide. In such situation they have their own guides.
I was very closed to buy those cheap top-end set, I called them and talked about parameters and performance, but finally they do not convinced me to buy it (still waiting for manual). I think it is not good mix with old, restored car.

So thanks to you guys I have bought following setup:
CLE-CB634P10
CLE-MS590P10
CLE-SH510S
HSN-2M139030
PIO-PE-108-B
PQX-0830202
SLP-245-1750-2
SLP-V-1783
SLP-V-1784
SLP-VG-5061
UEM-3101HC-030
and decide to go with whole COMP set:
CCA-K31-234-3

This I hope will make my life easier and reduce potential problems with interoperability. It is not easy from EU perspective to return goods and order again, since with sea cargo it is +2 months.

Thank you very much for your great help !
 

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A performance cam won't cost you much more than a new, factory cam. The factory 289 2V cam was pretty awful; the proverbial broomstick. Anything will be an improvement. The Edelbrock Performer cam is designed to work with everything else being factory components and it's much better than the factory cam.
 

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Sherif, the EU ? So, you're in Poland ? ! Well, that may change things. I was thinking in my head the US of A, cause thats where I am. Poland may well be largely metric only tools. Let me do some thinking and check on the valves you have chosen. LSG
 

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ok will ask him why he prefer such ones. It looks experienced and has a workshop since many years. He just mentioned me that some of non-metric drills are not accessible here where I supposed they need to be very accurate to prepare a hole for guide. In such situation they have their own guides.
I was very closed to buy those cheap top-end set, I called them and talked about parameters and performance, but finally they do not convinced me to buy it (still waiting for manual). I think it is not good mix with old, restored car.

So thanks to you guys I have bought following setup:
CLE-CB634P10
CLE-MS590P10
CLE-SH510S
HSN-2M139030
PIO-PE-108-B
PQX-0830202
SLP-245-1750-2
SLP-V-1783
SLP-V-1784
SLP-VG-5061
UEM-3101HC-030
and decide to go with whole COMP set:
CCA-K31-234-3

This I hope will make my life easier and reduce potential problems with interoperability. It is not easy from EU perspective to return goods and order again, since with sea cargo it is +2 months.

Thank you very much for your great help !
I think your choices are okay. I probably would have sprung for a larger valves but.... I didn't see exhaust seats listed...just intakes. Anyhow, with OE iron heads I having the seat simply machined into the head I would have just ground them for the larger valves and foregone the hardened seats... never saw valve seat recession on a passenger car nor seeing Ford warning not to use unleaded fuels, either, but...... also don't see a new oil pump or pump pick-up.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I think your choices are okay. I probably would have sprung for a larger valves but.... I didn't see exhaust seats listed...just intakes. Anyhow, with OE iron heads I having the seat simply machined into the head I would have just ground them for the larger valves and foregone the hardened seats... never saw valve seat recession on a passenger car nor seeing Ford warning not to use unleaded fuels, either, but...... also don't see a new oil pump or pump pick-up.
I got info from engine workshop that seats are ok. Then I was confused to do it or not due to unleaded fuel. In Poland all guys used those special gasoline additive for older cars, is not same with Mustang ? There is also a cost to do those seats ca $25 per seat + guides +machined and we got much more then new one. So I decided to buy just one for a test if my guy can do this (then with my part/seat should be cheaper).
Oil pomp is ok - I have measured clearance according service manual. If it will not give proper pressure I would change it.

Sherif, the EU ? So, you're in Poland ? ! Well, that may change things. I was thinking in my head the US of A, cause thats where I am. Poland may well be largely metric only tools. Let me do some thinking and check on the valves you have chosen. LSG
hmmm, it means that it is not so bad with my English :). Simple tools like socket wrenches are easy to buy (but not easy to remember those fractions ;) ), problem is with more specialize tools like those specific drills - espiecally for just generall workshops which serve all kinds of cars. Sometimes there exceptions ie I have seen exactly same spring tester which is on the picture in Ford service manual (and at least so old :) )
 

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I got info from engine workshop that seats are ok. Then I was confused to do it or not due to unleaded fuel. In Poland all guys used those special gasoline additive for older cars, is not same with Mustang ? There is also a cost to do those seats ca $25 per seat + guides +machined and we got much more then new one. So I decided to buy just one for a test if my guy can do this (then with my part/seat should be cheaper).
When the majority of US gasoline companies started adding TEL (tetraethyllead) as an anti-knock compound, not all the companies did so. Amoco decided against TEL and used aromatics to increase octane instead. No auto manufacturer that I know of ever published anything stating that leaded fuel was required.

The issue of valve seat recession in small block Ford cylinder heads is pretty much a non-issue. Where you COULD find valve seat recession was in gasoline-powered medium and heavy duty trucks and stationary power plants where the engine was operated the majority of time under load at moderate to high rpms, such as in school buses, dump trucks, semi-tractors, etc. In ordinary passenger car use it is rare to see it occur in anything made after 1960.

Also, it's the EXHAUST seat that is more prone to recession due to the heat that it's subject to, its size (mass) and the surface area available to transfer heat from the valve to the seat. If I was going to actually REPLACE a seat it would be the exhaust and not the intake.

As far as the guides, you might find it cheaper to consider guide LINERS or ream the guides and use valves with oversize stems versus machining the heads and pressing in new guides. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
The issue of valve seat recession in small block Ford cylinder heads is pretty much a non-issue. Where you COULD find valve seat recession was in gasoline-powered medium and heavy duty trucks and stationary power plants where the engine was operated the majority of time under load at moderate to high rpms, such as in school buses, dump trucks, semi-tractors, etc. In ordinary passenger car use it is rare to see it occur in anything made after 1960.
ok, so do you mean that you are not adding any "lead" to your fuel, like: Millers Oils VSPe ?
Can I tank std 95 or 98 octanes fuel without and additions - of course I am writing about normal car usage or weekend only (no races, no truck, etc) ?
 

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Perhaps these instead of your OEM type dished pistons will give you in increase in compression. I used the 4.040 in my rebuild. https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/slp-h273cp30/overview/make/ford I used a different cam, https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/crn-130032 port matched my heads, and also had some valve work done, hardened seats, 1.94" intake and 1.6" exhaust valves, and threaded rocker studs incase I wanted to go with a higher lift cam later. Also added a Cloyes true roller timing set.

The cost wasn't much more than stock but I get a more responsive acceleration from a stop. I have a five bolt block C4OE in my car. I thought about going with a roller motor but wanted to keep the original engine in my D Code Coupe.
I at the very least use this cam https://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS/555/200140/10002/-1 it's a nice upgrade on a stockish engine
 

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ok, so do you mean that you are not adding any "lead" to your fuel, like: Millers Oils VSPe ?
Can I tank std 95 or 98 octanes fuel without and additions - of course I am writing about normal car usage or weekend only (no races, no truck, etc) ?
Right. No "lead" substitutes are needed. In fact, lead in fuel actually causes engine/spark plug deposits and corrosion to exhaust pipes & headers. The primary reason it was used because it was the cheapest alternative in automobile fuels. Now, in aircraft it's a totally different story. Aircraft engines are in a constant state of load at moderate rpm and, primarily being air-cooled, at cylinder head temperatures of 100-200* C. They actually DO suffer from valve seat recession over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Right. No "lead" substitutes are needed. In fact, lead in fuel actually causes engine/spark plug deposits and corrosion to exhaust pipes & headers. The primary reason it was used because it was the cheapest alternative in automobile fuels. Now, in aircraft it's a totally different story. Aircraft engines are in a constant state of load at moderate rpm and, primarily being air-cooled, at cylinder head temperatures of 100-200* C. They actually DO suffer from valve seat recession over time.
Thank you for explanation, I've read already about aircrafts ;)

If we are on chemistry subject, which oil or other lubricant do you recommend during engine assembly (block, heads, etc) ?
I know that old school's mechanics used std oil, but my engine can stay after assembly for few months (for sure not years), so I heard that oil is not good idea and there is specific lube which stick to the metals and stay on them.
I also heard that if it will stay it is good to rotate it every 2-3 weeks.
 
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