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Discussion Starter #1
My dash was cut and new holes drilled to replace the factory radio with some cheesy aftermarket Craig unit. I have since cut the opening slightly more to fit a DIN radio. While I really like the radio, I just think it would really look cool with a retro radio in the car.

My question is has anyone used the metal repair panel and not welded it in? My interior is in great shape and I don't want to repaint the dash etc. I'm also curious how well the repair panel fits. I know this isn't exactly the right way to do this, but if it looks decent, I may live with it at least for the time being.

Does anyone have a picture of it installed with out welding?
 

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I don't have pictures but on mine, I cut the already butchered hole larger so the stock radio would just barely pass through. A friend runs a body shop and suggested using the glues newer cars are assembled with. We cleaned everything well and applied a thin layer of glue to both surfaces. Then we put on 4 (I think) clamps to hold it over night. You might be able to get by using 2 bolts in the radio knob holes to pull it together. I used a little filler on the edges as well as the dash pad, glove box door, and instrument cluster covering the edges. A little paint to match the rest of the painted area on the dash and you are done. You cannot tell it from factory, except the paint is a little different from the previously painted part.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was thinking about using some type of small carriage style bolt in the glove box and behind the instrument cluster to mount the panel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was thinking about making brackets to mount behind the dash. Thoughts?
 

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I don't think they fit the best inside the glove box and speedo bezel so I cut mind. I bolted it in place through the knob holes. Using the offset that goes through the center, starting at the speedo lower rib on the offset I started cutting swinging under the radio opening and back up to the lower rib by the glove box. At the top what I MEANT to do was start at the dash pad attaching holes on each side and go to the top rib of the offset, then finish it off by going from dash pad attaching hole from one to the other. Then just butt weld it in. Sounds weird but it worked for me. I messed up the top cut but it still worked ok. I went to the bottom rib with top cut on one side that wasn't bad enough so I did it again on the other side. Like said still worked ok though.
I did see one at a show just placed over dash and radio installed. Most people looking at the car probably didn't even notice it. Laid in there pretty nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The problem is that I can't use the knob holes, since there aren't any. My dash has a rectagular hole in it for a DIN radio.

I was thinking about maybe having my friend weld a small tab on the back of it so it would hook on the hole in the dash. That should support it well enough, right?

My plan is to paint it with the same color as the dash and somehow hold it on with out welding or adhesives. I'm going to put some thin neoprene on the back of it. That way if it doesn't work out well and I want to put my CD player back in, the dash isn't messed up under it.

Do you have a picture of yours?
 

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Looks good so far, Randy. On mine I put in a repair section from a donor car. I cut the new section approx. 6x10 and cut the dash 1/2 inch smaller all the way around. Then I used a panel flanger to get a stepped edge so the part would sit flush and applied panel bonder adhesive with a bunch of clamps. A little skim coat and sanding later, it's now in primer and ready for paint.
 

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Why not weld? Just do all the fitting first and then someone would probably weld it iin for you without much cost.

Here's how I would recomend doing it. First buy the metal patch panel, then mark the dash with a rectangle that covers all the drilled holes etc. Make the rectangle big enough so it's maybe a 1/4" past all the damage. Use masking tape to mark it and measure the size. Make it as square as possible. Then use the measurements to mark the same rectangle on the patch panel. Then trim the patch to lose all the stuff outside the rectangle. Then you can lay the trimmed patch over the dash hole and scribe a line around the patch. Then it's just a matter of cutting the dash to match the patch. You just make sure you don't cut the dash too big. If you don't have air or electric cutters, it can still be done with a hacksaw, just takes longer. Use a file to slowly make the dash hole big enough to perfectly match the patch. You don't want gaps.

Once you've done all that, just use a few pieces of masking tape to hold it at the right level so it's flush and take it to someone who has a welder. A few tack welds will lock it where it needs to be and the rest is easy.

Anyone with a welder will be impressed that you've got it all set up and ready to go. A little grinding on the welds and a thin layer of bondo and it will look like Henry Ford himself stamped it out and you can screw the radio in as intended.

All the short cut methods will end up being more work once you have to Jerry rig up some way behind the dash to support the radio.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
That looks good. If I was going to redo the dash I would do it that way.

I was thinking about using 2 peices of flat bar steel on the back side of the dash and sandwich the dash between them and the repair panel. Has anyone done that?

I know its the correct way to do it. I just don't want to weld it in right now, because the interior of my car is finished except for this little project. I do not want the mess in the interior, to risk damaging the interior, or to have to repaint the dash. I may do these things later but do not want to at this point. This is the interior.

 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Does anyone know what color illumination the USA 66 radio has? I'm hoping its the same blue/green as the factory gauges. I can't find the answer or a night time picture of it anywhere.

 

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Discussion Starter #13
I think I am going to put this project on hold for a while. I'm happy with my DIN Kenwood and it lights up green. After all the negative reviews I keep reading, I'm not sure I want to mess with the classic style radio right now.
 

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Does anyone know what color illumination the USA 66 radio has? I'm hoping its the same blue/green as the factory gauges. I can't find the answer or a night time picture of it anywhere.
Green, like the stock gauges. It is, however, noticeably brighter than the stock gauges. I don't mean the color, I mean the actual hue it gives off. It's fairly bright at night.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Green, like the stock gauges. It is, however, noticeably brighter than the stock gauges. I don't mean the color, I mean the actual hue it gives off. It's fairly bright at night.

Thats good to know. I wonder why they didn't make it the same as the original radio?
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Quick repair OK for a driver....
So this is like the fourth OLD thread you've revived just to stick in your link to this radio plate...
 
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I had a similar issue with the PO installing an aftermarket radio. I bought a stock-styled AM-FM stereo and built a cover plate. The first photo shows the extra holes and a cobbled up cutout for the face.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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In the nine years since his post, I expect TX found a solution. A nice piece to put in the classifieds though.
 
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