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Good morning all,
Im just curious has anyone done or seen a really good rattle can paint job. Every website I have visited says "dont do it",,,,"it wont come out right" blah blah blah.
I have my 67 coupe in the garage right now.It runs well,The interior is really nice. I want to enjoy my car. Still saving up the money for a really good paint job.I have spent all of my money on everything else.
If anyone has accomplished this goal of a really good paint job can you send me some tips. I have actually achieved halway decent results so far on the roof. I did that yesterday.
My process was I laid down primer first after etching primer on bare metal. I sanded with100 grit I believe. I bought the home depot 2x paint sanded last night with 400 grit to get it as smooth as possible. I wiped it with wax and grease remover I then laid down light coats after it dried I went back and found a few spots tht werent 100% then sanded that down smooth, Then Iwiped it again with remover and laid down a few more coats. I checked this morning and it wasnt bad,,,,
Any tips and please dont be that guy or gal that says, "yea save up your money and let the pro do it." The least expensive paint job i have found is $1500 all the way up to $30,000. I do have an air compressor but I figured this was the cheapest and most cost effective, and I dont have much experience with a paint gun
 

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You want 2 part paint - with hardener - try a cheap single stage and throw away HF gun - the problem with rust-o-leum type paints is they must be COMPLETELY removed before putting real paint on and they clog sandpaper when trying to sand it off......If you still insist on rust-o-leum get a gallon and cheap gun and get some japan drier to add to it so it will actually dry/harden - the gallon and gun will be way cheaper than the spay cans too.....
 

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I did a satin black paint job in my garage. Turned out ok. I was in the same boat as you. I needed to put a paint job on my car but didn't have the money for a professional job. I spent few days sanding out my old paint and then taped off the windows and sprayed away. If you use light a light touch and multiple coats you can get a decent finish. You can also sand between coats if you want. It is what it is for a $60 paint job. Plus you can drive and enjoy the car while you save.
740831
 

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You cannot lay down the spray from a can like you can a paint gun. When I bought my Springtime yellow 66 it was flat and faded. I found a satin finish lemon meringue color that matched the faded paint pretty good. But it was a 10 footer. Looked good from 10' away. I prepped the body and had Maaco spray it for $1800. I say spray it bc that's all they do- no matter what else they tell you they do or did!!! They had the car for 75 days and it never got it right. Stay away from Maaco in Chester, VA next to RT 288 and across from the WaWa..

I needed to edit my original bitchfest post. Someone else has said choose Maaco carefully. Some are good. The shop in Chester painted an old Accord for me and did decent job for $400. Not so good on the 66 Coupe and I spent 4 times as much. Maaco is a franchise and I did complain to the National sale director. But nothing was done. Live and learn- You get what you pay for. I have to keep the photo of the pin stripe they painted over in the post- how stupid can you be !!!
 

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First off, in my experience, Maaco quality varies by location. A lot. Do research, and if you find the right one, it can be a viable option. While certainly a budget option, if you do the prep well and the car lives in a garage, you should be good for a long while.

While I don't love the rattle can idea if it can possibly be avoided, any car that's being driven and enjoyed is a winner in my book. Better to spray away and enjoy than not drive it.
 

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Ive seen some pretty nice rattle can paint jobs.

After proper prep work and the proper environment to spray paint, the key is uniform paint thickness (mills) achieved by one person doing the painting, knowing basic painting techniques and following the manufacturers directions.

The handles that snap on the rattle can helps a bunch.

The best I have seen on a budget were rattle can base coat, HF equipment clear coat and 2000 grit wet sanding.
 

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The Maacos are franchises so it’s hit and miss. We’ve got a good one locally where the owner does custom work in the same shop under his own name. I think @PA_cob said it best, it is what it is for a paint job like that. Plus side is at least it doesn’t rust and you can drive it. It will fail at some point as that kind of paint isn’t for that job. My only other suggestion is that instead of regular Rustoleum is to hit a Tractor Supply or other farm/ranch supply and see about tractor or farm implement paint. They usually have some basic colors and it will be more durable that regular acrylic rattle can. It’s only a bit more than regular rattle can.

When you go to paint it for real you’ve created more work removing the rattle can but compared to the alternative you don’t have much choice. You could use a more durable touch up paint for autos but that’s several hundred bucks and I’m not sure it would look better but it’s likely to last better.
 

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For all the work that it takes i think you can get a better end result with a brush or foam roller than a rattle can. I did it on a sailboat. Each layer will go on thicker and give more to sand back to smooth. with spray cans you can start getting tiger stripes or splotches in shading that are hell to hide once started. I even got tiger stripes in some PlastiDip and could never make them go away.
My opinion now is Id rather drive a car with old failing crappy looking paint than fresh crappy looking soon to fail paint.:love:
 

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My opinion now is Id rather drive a car with old failing crappy looking paint than fresh crappy looking soon to fail paint.:love:
Last time the black car was painted was in '87 (may have been early '88). Cost me a whopping $350 dollars! That was at least it's third layer of paint. Once in awhile I've gone out and dabbed a little rustoleum on the chips. Maybe someday it will get painted right but dang it's expensive.

I think if it was stripped I might try it myself. I have a residential HVLP turbine I've used for cabinetry. Don't see why it wouldn't work for automotive paint.
 

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Search Google and see how people paint cars with Rustoleum Protective Enamel and rollers. It's very time-intensive maybe more than you think. It takes 5 to 7 coats and color sanding is part of each coat. The results can rival any single-stage paint and it's very durable. The cost is said to be under $300. Color selection is limited.
 

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Don't do it! For what all the rattle cans will cost, buy REAL automotive paint and use a HF HVLP spray gun. You'll get FAR BETTER results with a LOT LESS work, and nearly the same expense. It will look better and last longer too!
 

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I painted my 96 Land Cruiser with a Harbor Freight HVLP turbine, which is an "all in one" unit. If you thin enamel paint properly, it should flow out well and look brilliant. The HVLP turbine unit was $100 or so, and paint and thinner was $50. The finish comes out looking almost precisely like a race car finish from the '60s.

 

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Lots of folks much more knowledgeable than myself here but here is something to consider. If you just can't swing a compressor and insist on rattle cans, buy a dozen cans of 2K epoxy primer. The kind of cans that you have to break the internal seal and have limited amount of time to use. This stuff is close to regular automotive without the compressor. Sand down and surface prep everything, go with light coats. Color selection will be limited, probably black, grey, red oxide or white. A flat hot rod black job like PA_cob above always looks good. The epoxy will be fairly weather proof and durable until you can get around to doing a real spray job and can be scuffed and painted over later.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I did a satin black paint job in my garage. Turned out ok. I was in the same boat as you. I needed to put a paint job on my car but didn't have the money for a professional job. I spent few days sanding out my old paint and then taped off the windows and sprayed away. If you use light a light touch and multiple coats you can get a decent finish. You can also sand between coats if you want. It is what it is for a $60 paint job. Plus you can drive and enjoy the car while you save. View attachment 740831
this is the car you did in your Garage,,,,, I would say thats a more than decent paint job, thats awesome
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Don't do it! For what all the rattle cans will cost, buy REAL automotive paint and use a HF HVLP spray gun. You'll get FAR BETTER results with a LOT LESS work, and nearly the same expense. It will look better and last longer too!
I knew someone was going to say it lol
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hey guys thank you so much for the advice,,,,,,A lot of you guys said that I would have to sand off the paint I am using, If i do it right can Maaco or a painter paint over it. If i do it right
 

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Rattle can quality varies too, you can check your local automotive supplier to see if they offer a high quality one. Look for a nicer nozzle and don't do a metallic as it will be difficult to keep it even. Slower drying is going to be helpful and a satin finish might be more forgiving too. The 2k primer in black is a good idea as it will give much less drama to the painter later on, but will give you a nice satin finish now. If you can't get around the car quick enough, do a panel or section at a time.
 

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I used 12 cans of spray paint on my car when I was in college, dead broke. I was tired of driving around in gray primer. The store was going out of business and I got 12 cans of silver blue for $12. I'd say it was a 30-footer.

Since you already have a compressor, all you need is an inexpensive gravity feed gun, and you can achieve a pretty respectable finish. I used such a gun to repaint the hood and cowl on my Mountaineer, 2-part BC/CC, and it came out better than factory. And trust me, I'm not a painter. All I did was add the thinner and hardener as per directions, waiting 15 minutes between coats. Spray so the mist goes on with some orange peel to it. As it dries and hardens, it'll flow out to a smooth finish. I didn't even have to buff it out afterward.

 

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I think if I searched hard and long enough I'd find a photo of my '63 Fairlane and my buddy's '59 Jeep Wagon that were BOTH done with Rustoleum and a brush. No brush marks and shined like Telly Savalas' head.
 
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