Vintage Mustang Forums banner

21 - 40 of 167 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,692 Posts
Hey guys thank you so much for the advice,,,,,,A lot of you guys said that I would have to sand off the paint I am using, If i do it right can Maaco or a painter paint over it. If i do it right
No. Rattle can isn’t compatible with catalyzed automotive paint. Layers in auto painting are the key. When a layer isn’t compatible with an adjacent layer proper bonding does not take place. Rattle canning it will have to come off to at least the primer If you decide on a traditional automotive paint job. The exception might be if you used 2k rattle can epoxy primer. Even then you’ll have some issues with UV and element damage that will at least require you to scuff the car and apply another primer coat prior to top coat. Primer has a window in which to top coat and if you miss that or have other damage, UV, elements, whatever, at a minimum you’ll need another coat. Worst case you have to strip the primer off and prime again.

Your best long term bet is to use one of the low cost turbine guy kits and proper 2k paint. The paint doesn’t have to be mega high end. Your Eastwoods or TCP Globals work just fine. If you can do without factory color codes with a basic color in single stage (no separate clear coat) you’d be in a couple hundred for paint and chemicals, plus masking and prep plus whatever you spend on the turbine unit. You may be able to ebay or CL the gun after you’re done with the job to recover a bit of cash. I’d reckon about the least expensive DIY job using this method would be about $500 or so all in plus your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
IMO you will probably save more money buying a cheap spray gun on amazon and a gallon of some cheap automotive paint..... just think of how many spray paint cans you'll need!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
Get a HF paint gun and a gallon of spi epoxy primer. For a tick over 200$ you can have a semi gloss finish that will last for a couple years. The difference being you wont need to completely remove the epoxy primer to reshoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,943 Posts
I get your situation...you don't want to drop a lot of dough on the car, and you have no confidence in your ability with a spray gun.

I have confidence in your ability with a spray gun though.

So I'm trying to give the best advice to keep you closest to where you want to be. I would ditch the spray can, you will have mottling and striping like you wouldn't believe. At least spray it out of a cheap spray gun. It will take a lot of sanding to make it look good though, and rustoleum doesn't sand well...really plugs up paper. And it will chalk and fade with not a lot of time.

The next step up if you want to drop a little more cash but get a substantially better job is to shoot the entire car with 2 coats of black SPI epoxy. This would run $269 but it would be pretty shiny, very durable, and is one of the best automotive epoxies on the market. They are adding UV stabilizers in it now because so many people are using it for exterior purposes.

The next step up from this gets you putting single stage automotive paint on the car, and you can get an entire kit for $174. You'd still need to put this over an epoxy primer. I'd still recommend SPI in that case, it's only about $20 more than the Urekem material (after shipping is accounted for) but is a superior product.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,081 Posts
When spray paint was relatively cheap back in the early 70s I painted the hood of a 65 Mustang I used to have with a number of cans of Krylon red paint. I put an even but heavy coat of paint on the entire surface. When I was finished and the paint dried it didn't have the high gloss that I expected it to have. I began to buff it out by hand with rubbing compound. The more I rubbed, the deeper and higher the gloss got. When I was finished the paint looked really deep and had a very high gloss like a professional job. It was a lot of work and decided I wasn't going to paint the rest of the car that way. I got lucky, no drips, no runs.

Likewise around the same timeframe the neighbor across the street painted his 66 Tempest with a brush and yellow paint. He did tape off the areas he didn't want painted. My housemates and I were laughing watching this figuring the brush marks would stand out. He took an orbital buffer and some rubbing compound and the care was a 10 footer when he finished. It looked pretty good when he was done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
I'm not sure if your area offers it, but another cost effective option is to check with any tech schools in your area. By us we have a few tech school within 100 miles that welcomes classic vehicle projects for their body shop technician program. It's kind of a win / win for both parties. The students have a supervised project to work on, and all it cost the vehicle owner is materials. They can only accepted a few cars a year though.

Since I have too many projects in the works for me to do myself right now, we will be doing this with one of our 68 coupes in our local tech school starting in July 2020 (when new classes kick off) getting some minor body work done and then it will be painted by the students. We just signed up for this last week so I'm pretty excited since we were one the few vehicles to get in for this upcoming class.

The gotcha is time, if you're looking for something to be done quick, time is not your friend....In our case the body/paint program at the school is a 1.5 year program, so that is about how long it will take to get the car back since a group of students are assigned to the vehicle and that is one of their projects over those 1.5 years, but it's a relatively inexpensive route if you can be without your car that long. The other thing is you need to deliver the car to the school. In my case the car is already down to the shell so there isn't a lot of prep work for them.

Since the school partners with the local body shops who ultimately ends up hiring these students, the school gets their paint at discounted rates through the body shops so it's a good deal. The paint job will run me about $1,000 (base & clear), I will supply any sheet metal needed and there is no labor cost since its through the school.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
I get your situation...you don't want to drop a lot of dough on the car, and you have no confidence in your ability with a spray gun.

I have confidence in your ability with a spray gun though.

So I'm trying to give the best advice to keep you closest to where you want to be. I would ditch the spray can, you will have mottling and striping like you wouldn't believe. At least spray it out of a cheap spray gun. It will take a lot of sanding to make it look good though, and rustoleum doesn't sand well...really plugs up paper. And it will chalk and fade with not a lot of time.

The next step up if you want to drop a little more cash but get a substantially better job is to shoot the entire car with 2 coats of black SPI epoxy. This would run $269 but it would be pretty shiny, very durable, and is one of the best automotive epoxies on the market. They are adding UV stabilizers in it now because so many people are using it for exterior purposes.

The next step up from this gets you putting single stage automotive paint on the car, and you can get an entire kit for $174. You'd still need to put this over an epoxy primer. I'd still recommend SPI in that case, it's only about $20 more than the Urekem material (after shipping is accounted for) but is a superior product.

Thank you ,,, Thank you, Im going to try it whats the worst that could happen, Ive already got the compressor, Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
I'm not sure if your area offers it, but another cost effective option is to check with any tech schools in your area. By us we have a few tech school within 100 miles that welcomes classic vehicle projects for their body shop technician program. It's kind of a win / win for both parties. The students have a supervised project to work on, and all it cost the vehicle owner is materials. They can only accepted a few cars a year though.

Since I have too many projects in the works for me to do myself right now, we will be doing this with one of our 68 coupes in our local tech school starting in July 2020 (when new classes kick off) getting some minor body work done and then it will be painted by the students. We just signed up for this last week so I'm pretty excited since we were one the few vehicles to get in for this upcoming class.

The gotcha is time, if you're looking for something to be done quick, time is not your friend....In our case the body/paint program at the school is a 1.5 year program, so that is about how long it will take to get the car back since a group of students are assigned to the vehicle and that is one of their projects over those 1.5 years, but it's a relatively inexpensive route if you can be without your car that long. The other thing is you need to deliver the car to the school. In my case the car is already down to the shell so there isn't a lot of prep work for them.

Since the school partners with the local body shops who ultimately ends up hiring these students, the school gets their paint at discounted rates through the body shops so it's a good deal. The paint job will run me about $1,000 (base & clear), I will supply any sheet metal needed and there is no labor cost since its through the school.
That is a great idea, we have a trade tech not far from here, will check with them and see what they got.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Ok all, after Lizers inspiring words, I am going to try to spray it myself. So here is the question, I have done a moderate amount of prep work and plan to do more. Can I spray epoxy primer over the paint job i already did or do I need to go pack down to bare metal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,692 Posts
Ok all, after Lizers inspiring words, I am going to try to spray it myself. So here is the question, I have done a moderate amount of prep work and plan to do more. Can I spray epoxy primer over the paint job i already did or do I need to go pack down to bare metal.
What paint did you already put down? Unless it’s proper auto paint or primer it’s going to have to come up. Whatever material you buy should have a tech sheet that will tell you how to prep what you are painting. My only concern is that a gallon (of anything) will properly cover a classic Mustang. Best case you’ll use every bit of that gallon, worst case you’ll need another quart or two.

How big is your compressor? If it’s smaller than 10 cfm you’ll have to do the car in panels as the HF gun takes a bit of flow to paint large areas. Still far better than using a rattle can. I used the HF guns quite a bit before I bought a set of pro guns. Can’t beat the price. It will be at least as good as home rattle can and probably much better even with no experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,943 Posts
Thank you ,,, Thank you, Im going to try it whats the worst that could happen, Ive already got the compressor, Thanks
The worst that could happen is you have some tiger striping (which could have happened with rattle can too), and you have a lot of orange peel and runs and will just have to do a lot of sanding. But with an actual urethane automotive paint your paint job will look a thousand times better than any rattle can job, and it will last much longer too. You can sand your arms off to make it perfect and it will look great.

Let's not move too quickly or rashly. Don't buy anything yet either. It's important to plan this out so you don't end up buying the wrong stuff or do the wrong thing.

So to start with, what is currently on your car? How did you apply it and what brand, etc.

Second--which paint system were you thinking about going with?

Third--do you just want color, and don't care if there's ripples or little dings in the body work? The minimal option is to simply put down epoxy and then your color over that. If you want to start perfecting the body then you're getting mission creep. It's not that much more difficult, but will cost more money and require more time. I'm trying to keep my suggestions as inexpensive for you while still getting the maximum bang for your buck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,581 Posts
You'll shoot your eye out kid!

I'd like to see how it looks now that its so bad you'll spend 100 hours hours and many hundreds of dollars for something temporary.
You want an impressively shiny as hell look that wont add extra cost later to un-do when you get serious? Vinyl wrap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,943 Posts
You'll shoot your eye out kid!

I'd like to see how it looks now that its so bad you'll spend 100 hours hours and many hundreds of dollars for something temporary.
You want an impressively shiny as hell look that wont add extra cost later to un-do when you get serious? Vinyl wrap.
If he uses automotive paint now, it won't be temporary and he won't need to do it again. It will just be done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I was looking to do the exact same thing with my LTD...Harbor Freight is a mile from my house!
My car came in primer, and is pretty straight. However, I think I am going the wrap route...i got quoted $2700 for everything, and the quality seems amazing I could never get results close to a wrap...and if i was to get it sprayed, it would probably run over $5k for similar results!


Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,989 Posts
@67 Doctor , I sprayed this car with SPI epoxy primer (not the door of course) with a cheap harbor freight gun. This car doesn't have to be perfect as it's being built to track. I've never painted a car before but it turned out pretty good. Don't be afraid to try (not that I would on my GT, I'm having it painted).

Lots of paint knowledge on this forum to learn from, some are already giving good advice to you. Good Luck!!

740911


Allen
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
19,646 Posts
I don't know about "car" paint being "a 100o times better". There's lots of options. There's a gigantic thread on a Mopar forum where people experimented with rolling on various enamels and there were lots of success stories. Cars used to come from the factory with alkyd enamel . (What Rustoleum is.)
I've actually used Rustoleum. Despite what people might say, it is quite sandable. Two things though, you want to use the "hardener" additive if you spray it and two, you'll want to wet-sand.
Removing it later isn't so bad. My grandkids and I respray their ATV at the end of each season. All the plastic body work comes off and is soaked with Easy Off oven cleaner and then hit with a pressure washer. Back to bare naked plastic. So far it's been red, yellow, camo, and white. All with various stripes and designs. The boys have outgrown that one now and I caught them reminiscing on whether they had more fun riding it or doing the paint jobs.
I didn't really ever take pictures of it but I found one without mud all over it.


Another sample I dressed up with a coat of clear poly but everything under it except the lettering and decals is Rustoleum Professional from the shelves of Home Depot.


A third one is in progress. Has yet to see the black and all the details. Changed my mind of some of it since this picture. Fuel tank was a waste of paint and effort as it had too much rust damage. Replacement tank is still in bare metal. Decided some of the two-tone was overly busy and sanded off some of the red. Like the front fender is no longer two tone.


No pictures, but I used an old hood for testing spray patterns of Rustoleum and left it out on the sunny side of the garage for about three years. Before it went for scrap I looked at it and the paint looked better than the Omni acrylic enamel "car paint" that I used for body repair on one of my drivers. That was equally ignored. The Omni of about some age was showing signs of chalking where none of the four colors of Rustoleum were. In that one actual test I did anyway.

For some reason people tend to judge Rustoleum by how it does on farm equipment and patio furniture. If you put it on a car with zero preparation and never wash, wax, or polish it ever then it's going to look shabby no matter what it is. Other people love to pile on on how bad it will be even though they have never even personally used it at all. It's weird.

One problem with Rustoleum being an option in LA would be that it may not be possible to get the enamel "hardener" there. At all. It has some fairly nasty isocynates and such in it. I get mine from Tractor Supply Company, of all places. They also sell enamel implement paint which people have successfully painted cars with. One upside of using some of these enamels is that you end up with a sort "soft" paint finish which looks really vintage correct on '60's cars which came with enamel paint originally. Some later cars used enamel too. A friend's 1981 Isuzu says "alkyd enamel" right on the body buck tag.It has original paint and still looks pretty good. A lot better than my 1995 F150 with the clear baked off half of it. (OEM base coat/clear coat)

As for spray can paint, that's what my '67 has been wearing for years. Technically. It's a garage queen in what is basically full mockup. The spray is silver lacquer chosen because it adds a little moisture protection over bare primer and it's very easy to sand away. At some point I will stop fitting bits, tear it all back down, and sand it all back down in final preparation for the real finish coat. Which won't be Rustoleum because I want metallic paint in colors they don't offer. Now that I mention it, I wonder if my wife would actually notice if her Oxford White '86 got repainted in Gloss White (Rustoleum) instead?


:unsure:
 
21 - 40 of 167 Posts
Top