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I am in the process of rebuilding the front suspension in my 69 Mach 1 and am having an issue with the upper control arm bushings. I had decided to rebuild the UCA's rather than replace them and bought a rebuild kit in order to accomplish that. I have the left side pulled apart, so I'm working on that first. After using a lot of penetrating lube, heat and an impact wrench, I got the bushings and shaft off of the first UCA. Now, when I try to install the new bushings, they won't thread in to the arm. The threads seem like they are stripped, or non-existent so the caps slide all the way in to the holes in the UCA, but they do thread on to the shaft. I can pivot the shaft within the bushings with a little effort. I'm also doing the Arning drop, welding in the Boss 302 reinforcements,installing new springs and roller perches while I have the access. My dilemma is should I weld the caps in place, or am I fighting a losing battle and just go out and purchase new UCA's?

Thanks -

Mike
 

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That happens often- removing the old bushings strips the threads out of the control arm. Can you trade the rebuild kits in on new UCAs?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't know. I bought it through that auction site as part of a larger kit that had upper ball joints, lower control arms, tie rod ends, spring perches & spring isolators. It was from a major vendor though, so I might be able to.
 

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I just went through this on my 66 and same thing, threads were gone once I removed the old bushings. Those bushings were tough to remove! I wanted to save the arms just for the sake of feeling good about re-using as much as I can, but ended up buying new.
 

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I've done a bunch of them. The threads are fine and shallow. Rust makes them worse. Clean the threads well with a wire wheel. You will need to be careful and adamant, but get them started ( there's only been one time I could not ). Then once both are installed and centered , put three good tack welds on each side.
 

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Why would you rebuild the old UCA's that are most likely not centered very well when you can buy brand new Moog UCA's for $57/ea with free shipping and for probably the same cost or less than your rebuild kits? http://www.streetsideauto.com/p/moog-rk621369/?utm_source=googlepepla&utm_medium=adword&gclid=CO7d-ZG7wc0CFYsAaQodaMIMgg
Because they are rarely centered properly, either, and need to be set before installation.
I've done a bunch of them. The threads are fine and shallow. Rust makes them worse. Clean the threads well with a wire wheel. You will need to be careful and adamant, but get them started ( there's only been one time I could not ). Then once both are installed and centered , put three good tack welds on each side.
What he said. I use three welds, too. Easy, and secure. I've seen untouched originals come loose. Rebuild with tack weld. Heck, I tack weld new ones (after recentering).
 

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Because they are rarely centered properly, either, and need to be set before installation.

What he said. I use three welds, too. Easy, and secure. I've seen untouched originals come loose. Rebuild with tack weld. Heck, I tack weld new ones (after recentering).
I bought new Moog UCA's, before installing them I double checked to make sure they were centered and they were spot on. The originals that I had on the car were so far off center that one of the zerk fittings was hitting the inside of the shock tower. I've heard that a couple tack welds does make it more safe though and less likely to separate
 

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I bought new Moog UCA's, before installing them I double checked to make sure they were centered and they were spot on. The originals that I had on the car were so far off center that one of the zerk fittings was hitting the inside of the shock tower. I've heard that a couple tack welds does make it more safe though and less likely to separate
I tack welded my new UCA's too. 3 welds on each nut cap.
 

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I only use rebuilt original uppers. As others have said in your case, a few welds to hold the caps and you're good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, I decided to weld them on, no issues. The rod was dead centered on the first one. So I start to drill the first shock tower for the Arning drop with a starter bit and a step drill to 1/2 inch, again no problem. I purchased a 17/32 bit for the final enlargement. There lies the problem. The bit grabbed the hole and spun the drill out of my hand. I now have two broken bones in my hand and need to see an orthopedic surgeon. No work on the car for me for a while.

What's the correct number of drill bit sizes to jump when drilling out holes?

Mike
 

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Ouch! Sorry to hear that. I forget my smaller sizes, did not use a step bit. Last two were a 1/2 and then the 17/32. I'm sure during the process of drilling 4 holes the bit grabbed and twisted the drill a bit in my hands a couple of times. Hope your hand heals up nicely and you can resume normal activities.
 

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That's happened to me hundreds (if not thousands) of times. The bit snags in the hole and the drill spins twisting my wrists. I've been drilling with a drill press when the bit snags and the piece I'm drilling into spins like a whirling dervish trying to take my left hand off my arm. Fortunately I've never sprained or broken anything.
 
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That's happened to me hundreds (if not thousands) of times. The bit snags in the hole and the drill spins twisting my wrists. I've been drilling with a drill press when the bit snags and the piece I'm drilling into spins like a whirling dervish trying to take my left hand off my arm. Fortunately I've never sprained or broken anything.
Three possibilities, you either never took a Tech Ed class, or you had a lousy Tech Ed teacher, or you choose not to follow what you have learned, because . . . . you never drill into metal on a drill press without the work piece being clamped, secured, safely. It is very dangerous.
 

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What's the correct number of drill bit sizes to jump when drilling out holes?

Mike
Sorry to hear about the accident. Hope you heal up quick and without complications.

There is no magic step size on drills that will eliminate this problem.

First if you have a drill that has the side handle that can be attached ( my Milwaukee 1/2 does) Use it. It gives you a much better grip.

Second, as the bit gets close to breaking through back way off on the pressure and brace yourself.

You can hear the sound of the cutting action change as you get close.

Drilling large holes free hand is serious business.
 

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Got the big drill with the side handle. I learned that when I burned out my Dad's 3/8 drill the first time I did this 30+ years ago. It actually happened at the start of punching through with the last bit. The stepped drill must have left a ragged edge that the last bit grabbed. Perhaps if I had a reamer and was able to clean up the hole so there wasn't an edge to catch.

I knew it was going too smoothly. The stepped bit was "goin through like butta".
 
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Start a pilot hole with an 1/8" bit. Then go to 1/4". Then you don't want to go larger than 3/8" at the next step, then finally drill to your desired finish size . . if 1/2" or under.
 
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