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Discussion Starter #1
After reading this .pdf from a 2014 post on this board I'm fairly sure that a standard 289 v8 coupe came with the rubber isolated drive shaft.

Starting to lean towards putting re-balancing money (100-150$) towards a new driveshaft while pursuing other avenues of the vibrations. I've found that throwing money towards any 50 year old part with rubber in them is ultimately wasted money. However there are SO many options for drive shafts out there I'm wondering what the best places to get one are from those with experience.

Current engine is mild and can't be much more than stock 4bbl configuration. Will one day be replaced with the rebuilt 289. Probably will never be more than 300 hp and 300-ish ft/lbs torque.

From what I've seen a steel shaft is about $350 avg and an aluminum about $450 avg. I have read that the aluminum are strong enough and handle vibration much better than stock steel shafts.
 

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Thanks for sharing this nice driveshaft reference chart. However, I don't see where the "289V Coupe came with a rubber isolated drive shaft".
I do see a reference to those cars with a 352 and 427Vs had a rubber isolator. My 65 has the steel tube drive shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for sharing this nice driveshaft reference chart. However, I don't see where the "289V Coupe came with a rubber isolated drive shaft".
I do see a reference to those cars with a 352 and 427Vs had a rubber isolator. My 65 has the steel tube drive shaft.
I agree that page 6 says "driveshaft with sound proofing liner". does not support my conclusion but page 7 states: "All Models with 2.80:1....." next that cell it says Drive Shaft Type Rubber Damped One Piece" then farther over it says "Single Steel Tube sound proofing liner"

It's pretty confusing. My car is C code coupe and I verified has an 8" rear end type so it's almost certainly 2.80:1.

Perhaps one of more expert people here will have knowledge of this. That document could always be wrong, my shaft swapped.....etc.

Someone in another thread upon seeing a video of me testing the end play of the yoke shaft said that I have allot of shiny shaft sticking out. I'm wondering how that could change. It is sitting on new aftermarket motor mounts and has a 74 302 instead of the orig 289. Fan/clutch ratio fit perfectly so I don't think I'm too far forward for the engine.

In any event.....labor out here is pricey and I have that feeling that throwing money at this shaft is a waste of time and money and might not produce desired results anyhow.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Street or track has some great aluminum driveshafts at good price
Not too terrible at $350 for a custom cut aluminum shaft length. But a stock setup should be a known fixed length a new yoke would add another 85$ + and then it all still has to be balanced together, correct? Or do they balance shaft separately from the yoke?
 

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I think I'm the one that mentioned that you have a lot of exposed yoke in another thread. If you decide to buy an aluminum driveshaft be sure to measure and get one that is the correct length for your setup. And a T5 uses a shorter yoke than a C4, Toploader or T10. I read somewhere that using the longer yoke in a T5 will block oil flow to certain internal parts.
Before I took my driveshaft to be balanced I called the shop and asked which parts they needed. He told me to bring it in exactly how it would be installed with yoke and front and rear u-joints.
I've cut several Mustang driveshafts open and I don't recall ever seeing anything inside one of them. I've heard that some driveshafts use an internal cardboard tube as a silencer. And I've seen the 2 piece shafts with a rubber damper between them. But Mustangs were built to meet a price set by Iacocca (less than $2500) so Ford didn't spend a nickel on anything that wasn't absolutely necessary.
 

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Aluminum drive shaft from a 2 wheel drive 4 door Explorer
This is what I did. Paid about $25 for the driveshaft at a Pull-A-Part, and put the correct yoke and u-joints on it for all around $100. The hard part is finding an aluminum driveshaft that hasn't been beat up by the forklift at the junkyard when putting the vehicle in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think I'm the one that mentioned that you have a lot of exposed yoke in another thread. If you decide to buy an aluminum driveshaft be sure to measure and get one that is the correct length for your setup. And a T5 uses a shorter yoke than a C4, Toploader or T10. I read somewhere that using the longer yoke in a T5 will block oil flow to certain internal parts.
Before I took my driveshaft to be balanced I called the shop and asked which parts they needed. He told me to bring it in exactly how it would be installed with yoke and front and rear u-joints.
I've cut several Mustang driveshafts open and I don't recall ever seeing anything inside one of them. I've heard that some driveshafts use an internal cardboard tube as a silencer. And I've seen the 2 piece shafts with a rubber damper between them. But Mustangs were built to meet a price set by Iacocca (less than $2500) so Ford didn't spend a nickel on anything that wasn't absolutely necessary.
I’ve got an original rebuilt C4 in my car. If I had a shaft that was too short would it even propel the car? Can you slide the shaft in more and still tighten the rear union to the differential? I’ll measure it when I pull it out this weekend.
 

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I’ve got an original rebuilt C4 in my car. If I had a shaft that was too short would it even propel the car? Can you slide the shaft in more and still tighten the rear union to the differential? I’ll measure it when I pull it out this weekend.
As long as the splines inside the yoke and those on the tailshaft of the transmission have 1/4" of engagement the car will move. But I imagine it would vibrate like a paint shaker.
The only way to get more of the yoke inside the transmission is to lengthen the driveshaft.
 

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I did the same as 2nd66 & LeeFred did & used an aluminum driveshaft from a 2wd 4 door Explorer.
737033
100_1572.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #15
As long as the splines inside the yoke and those on the tailshaft of the transmission have 1/4" of engagement the car will move. But I imagine it would vibrate like a paint shaker.
The only way to get more of the yoke inside the transmission is to lengthen the driveshaft.
I know for a fact there are in on the shaft more than that 🤣
Don’t see how anything got changed by having a 74 302 with after market motor mounts put in. If it all inched forward my fan and clutch would hit the rad up front. But I’ll def keep in mind to measure the yoke & shaft to see if something short was swapped in.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I know for a fact there it’s in on the shaft more than that 🤣
Don’t see how anything got changed by having a 74 302 with after market motor mounts put in. If it all inched forward my fan and clutch would hit the rad up front. But I’ll def keep in mind to measure the yoke & shaft to see if something short was swapped in.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
As long as the splines inside the yoke and those on the tailshaft of the transmission have 1/4" of engagement the car will move. But I imagine it would vibrate like a paint shaker.
The only way to get more of the yoke inside the transmission is to lengthen the driveshaft.
So @awhtx I did some extensive thread research on google on this same issue. Not surprisingly a few people been down this road before.
Looks like many people had different yoke lengths cut for one reason or another. Some guys had to loosen motor mounts and slide things back 3/4 an inch or so. But what’s important is how much spline the yoke is engaging more than how much sticks out like you said. I’ll double down on that measure.
However my rear spring replacement could also have shifted the rear end back a bit.... or I’m thinking since the car ran sagging springs for so long more yoke was inside making it look shiny. I think the golden rule consensus is to bottom it and pull back 1” max and see where I’m at. Mark it and see how much farther it goes out to mate at the pumpkin. Then total up the over all length and engagement seating.
This is gonna be a hoot on jackstands. Just might drive it to my base shop lift bays for this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
A $150 for a driveshaft balance? I was just charged $60 for a balance and clean up plus $40 to install my u-joints after my HF press wouldn’t fully seat them.
I found a Virginia shop a little way out that does it same day for 100$ :) You don't know about the prices in the Washington D.C. metro area. Many shops have a 150+ hourly labor rate.
 
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