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Has anybody refinished their cobra valve covers and/or air cleaner? I have the black crinkle type. The black is peeled and needs redone. Ideas?
 

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If it were me I would bead blast all the black paint off it. Then repaint it with the black crinkle paint. When paint has dried use a small buffing wheel and remove the paint off the lettering.
 

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I did my valve covers many years ago. As mod9 said blast them and paint with crinkle paint. Wait for a warm day to paint them or the paint won't crinkle. Then I block the high lights with 80 grit.

Larry
 

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I agree that fresh wrinkle paint OR bead blasting looks great. When the wrinkle paint on mine got bad enough, I got disgusted and stripped off the paint with Jasco remover. Just the plain cast aluminum now. Nope, it doesn't look as hi-tech, but does have a sorta clean honest look to it...and matches the other aluminum accessories.
 

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BluEuc said:
I agree that fresh wrinkle paint OR bead blasting looks great. When the wrinkle paint on mine got bad enough, I got disgusted and stripped off the paint with Jasco remover. Just the plain cast aluminum now. Nope, it doesn't look as hi-tech, but does have a sorta clean honest look to it...and matches the other aluminum accessories.
Let's see a picture of those in the compartment, please.
 

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Ditto on cleaning and repainting them with some heat to make it crinkle.

Once they were cured, I used a pad sander and sanded off the paint on the high spots (ribs, letters, etc). Amazing how much aluminum had to come off to get everything straight and pit free.

Looked far better than a pair out of the box.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I use pretty much the same methods. Bead blast then black wrinkle. I like my highlights polished though. So right after bead blasting I sand the fins and lettering down even and smooth, up to about 400 grit sandpaper. Then I do the wrinkle paint. Once the paint is about half set but still gooey I take a plastic scraper and gently remove a large part of the paint from where I want the polished areas to show. This makes it easier to polish them down. After the paint is completely dry then I use 400 grit sandpaper again. I find wet sanding with a lot of water makes it easier to keep the new wrinkle paint clean. You can sand in one direction to get the brushed aluminum finish but I usually go with 600 grit wet paper and then buff to a mirror shine.
 

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After the wrinkle paint dried (took about 4 days) I used a wood chisel to take off most of the paint on the ribs then finished with 150 grit sandpaper on a wood block.

Was really tough to sand in the nooks and crannies.
 

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I like them just plain bead blasted without the black. The early cars through 67 were not black. There is nothing better looking IMHO under the hood of a 65/66 then raw, plain aluminum Cobra VC's. Bead blast them and then sand the ribs and letters clean and clear coat them with high heat clear. Nice, clean, simple and a calssic look. Not to mention easier to do!

But either way you will be surprised at how good they will look.
 

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I recently painted my cobra rotors and while the paint was still wet took a rag and wiped down the lettering so it would remain natural. Using this technique on the covers would avoid sanding. Just a thought. :)
 

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Yes, but the sanding gives the fins and letters a frfesh look. The originals were also sanded.
 
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