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The output shaft in my 65 C4 automatic seems to have excessive play since it wiggles back and forth about 1/4 inch either way. Due to a sever driveline vibration at 60 mph, I took my driveshaft in for a complete rebuild and a brand new slip yoke. I am thinking that the tailshaft bushing in my C4 is bad because my old slip yoke was worn where it rides in the bushing. I made a post a few days ago about this and was told that I could take the car to a transmission shop and they could replace the bushing without removing the tail housing. However, I am afraid to drive the car with my new yoke for fear of tearing it up too. Plus, the guy at the driveshaft shop told me that the C4 tailshaft bushing has to be pressed in thus requiring the removal of the tail housing. Does anybody disagree with this? I have had so many different opinions that I don't know which one is right. I am considering removing the tail housing myself and am wondering if it is a simple unbolt? Is there anything inside the tail housing other than the output shaft and speedo gear that may come falling out? I also thought about buying the bushing removal tool but this may not bee too cost effective.
 

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Have done this repair myself. Remove tailshaft as per previous posts and have the bushing replaced at a tranny or machine shop.

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68 1/2 CJ Coupe

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Plus, the guy at the driveshaft shop told me that the C4 tailshaft bushing has to be pressed in thus requiring the removal of the tail housing. Does anybody disagree with this?

Yes! I do... Transmission shops have a special driver to re-install the bushing. No nuclear physics degree required for tailshaft removal, unbolt the mount, jack the tranny up, remove the crossmember, lower the trans a bit. No major parts to jump out, remove the bolts from around the tailhousing and slip it off. Go easy on the old gasket, if you rip it, throw it away and use a small amount of silicone.

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In the manual for my 66, they show bushing replacement using special tools that pull out and push in the bushing using only a socket wrench. No mention of extension removal. As far as removing the extension goes, no biggie. Nothing should fall out.
Have you checked with a local Ford dealer? C4s were around a long time and used in all models. I bet some dealers still have the tools needed to do the job in-place. Maybe they would loan them to you.

Vintage Burgundy 1966 Mustang GT Fastback (Midlife's younger brother)
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With the proper driver (kinda like a stepped tube with a flat end to bonk on) you can install the new bushing with the trans in place. There's a tool with fingers that fit next to the tailshaft and hook on to the bushing and the tool either has a slide hammer or rests against the extension housing and uses threads to get the old bushing out.

Since it's always been easier for me to pull the extension housing out than to make the requisite tools, that's what I've always done...
Either way is plausible, depending on your circumstances and access to the right tools...

As others have mentioned, R&R of extension housing is no biggie...

Pat
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all for the advice on this. This morning, I was successfully able to remove the tail housing and it was as easy as pie. Nothing to do now but take it in and have the bushing replaced. By the way, the bushing was all scored and in bad shape.
 

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To reinstall a bushing without expensive machine shop equipment is to place the new bushing in a pot of boiling water to expand it. You will need tongs or pliers to grip it so you dont burn your fingers. If you also removed the output shaft you can place it in the refrigerator or a bucket of ice water so it will contract allowing the new bushing to slide on easier. You may also need a piece of hollow copper tubing or a pvc tube to press the bushing on the shaft so you dont damage the bushing. If the old bushing is so worn out that it slides off the shaft without much force then there is a good chance it damaged the shaft and you would need to replace the shaft. If it is borderline loose you may be able to secure the new bushing with some loctite designed for that application environment. I have also used this technique for rear axle bushing replacement. If the bushing is really stuck on the shaft then you may need to heat it up with a propane torch evenly all around the bushing.
 

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What a very old thread!
The tailhousing bushing is NOT on a shaft. It's pressed into the tailhousing. Heating and cooling of the involved parts won't help like it might in other situations. Though we say "pressed" replacement simply involves a correctly sized driver and a hammer. Since the bushing is so thin it takes a specially sized driver which isn't practical for most people to purchase just to use one time. So paying a transmission shop to swap it out real quick for you is the most practical way to go. Pat above isn't all that practical and likes nothing better than an excuse to make a new tool on a lathe instead of buying/renting one so that works better for him.
 

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Your right Gypsy, I like the part just remove the out put shaft and place in refrigerator, sorta like screwing a nut off a bolt.

Dave
 
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