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Removing dried weatherstrip adhesive

810 Views 35 Replies 18 Participants Last post by  kenash
As my title implies, what are house guys finding that removes old dried weatherstrip adhesive? I'm hoping can remove it without too much underlying paint damage. Thanks for any suggestions
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, after 30 second search, another name for Toulene is Xylene. I have a 3M General Purpose remover that contains "Xylene". See how this works.
Will keep you posted.

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Replaced the trunk weatherstripping on my FB and also on a friend's coupe. Both cars, I used goo gone on the old adhesive. Soaked it quite well, let it sit for a few hours and rubbed away. Took some time but I was able to get all of the old adhesive removed and there was no damage to the paint/ YMMV

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
OK, I'm running a test ss I enter this..that is, I have two test patches, one with Goo-Gone, the other with the 3M adhesive remover (contains the Xylene). I'll check in a couple hours, or so, and report. We'll see if it's a "win, lose, or draw"!
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I have had good luck with professional strength Goof Off. I picked it up at Home Depot. I was having a tough time getting anything to dissolve the adhesive used to apply the weather striping around the windows, the PS Goof Off works, but slowly. You will need to apply it and remove the softened layers. Sort of like what paint stripper does, it removes the top layers, then reapply and keep working your way down to metal.
 

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Depends on how much adhesive you need to remove. I had a lot of adhesive to remove behind a door panel from the water shield and I found a little kerosene did the trick. I put the kerosene in a tuna can and used a small acid brush to apply it. Then cleaning the kerosene off was easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok, my unofficial results ....
I let them both soak for about 2 hours. I removed the "Goo-Gone" soak paper towel strip and using a tooth brush, began scrubbing. It did soften and "raise" the residue , however, will need more applications. Following the same routine with the 3M product, containing (Xylene/Toulene). it did edge out the "GOO-G", but, not by much. Both need additional applications in succession.
So, there you go. Either works, the 3M is slightly better in eating away at it. The key, seems to be, apply a soaked cloth, paper towel etc and keep it wet for a period of time depending on the layers. BTW, did not seem to affect the old 50 year old Alkyd Enamel based paint applied in the early 70s.
 

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